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Re: Hammock Camping baby hammocks

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  • karens62@aol.com
    In a message dated 9/24/2003 6:56:29 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ciyd@attbi.com ... Or, you might not. The Consumer Safety Product Comission recommends that
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 24, 2003
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      In a message dated 9/24/2003 6:56:29 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ciyd@... writes:

      You hard core hammocking parents might consider something like that
      for your new bundles of joy :-)

      Or, you might not. The Consumer Safety Product Comission recommends that infants not sleep on soft surfaces.

      "
      PROBLEM: Without spreader bars to hold the mini-hammock bed open, the mini-hammocks can suddenly twist around children's' necks and strangle them. Also, infants sleeping on soft bedding can become wedged in positions in which they cannot breathe.................... CPSC also recommends that babies never be placed on soft bedding. To prevent suffocation, babies should sleep in a crib on a firm, flat mattress on their backs with no pillows or other soft bedding. "

      Just something to think about.

      Karen



      http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml01/01500.html


    • ciyd01
      There s no way to accurately describe what I saw, but the design was such that the hammock could not be twisted around itself, even empty. All four corners
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 24, 2003
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        There's no way to accurately describe what I saw, but the design was
        such that the hammock could not be twisted around itself, even
        empty. All four corners were tied off at the 4 corners of the
        hammock support making it spread out. The sides were prevented from
        closing up around the baby. The support was similar to a sawhorse,
        but the upper cross beam was actually two beams at least 12 inches
        apart. So the 4 corners of the hammock were at least 12 inches
        apart, side to side, and 24 inches apart, lengthwise. The advantages
        I saw to this over the western crib were: 1) cooler in a tropical
        climate, 2) prevented the baby from rolling over onto its stomach and
        reducing the risk of SIDS, 3) comfort - no pressure points, and 4)
        the baby could be gently rocked although the amount is severely
        limited.

        For the types of hammocks we use, I would also be concerned about
        them twisting. With these, it would have been physically impossible
        for CPSC scenario.

        Wish I had a picture of it. You would then be able to see what I
        mean.



        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, karens62@a... wrote:
        > In a message dated 9/24/2003 6:56:29 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
        ciyd@a...
        > writes:
        >
        > > You hard core hammocking parents might consider something like
        that
        > > for your new bundles of joy :-)
        >
        > Or, you might not. The Consumer Safety Product Comission recommends
        that
        > infants not sleep on soft surfaces.
        >
        > "PROBLEM: Without spreader bars to hold the mini-hammock bed open,
        the
        > mini-hammocks can suddenly twist around children's' necks and
        strangle them. Also,
        > infants sleeping on soft bedding can become wedged in positions in
        which they
        > cannot breathe.................... CPSC also recommends that babies
        never be
        > placed on soft bedding. To prevent suffocation, babies should sleep
        in a crib on
        > a firm, flat mattress on their backs with no pillows or other soft
        bedding. "
        >
        > Just something to think about.
        >
        > Karen
        >
        >
        > http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml01/01500.html
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