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Re: Hammock Camping What happens if ridgeline snaps?

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  • Dennis Shubitowski
    Well, I guess bouncing wasn t quite the right word! I pull the fabric over to use as a chair and usually have to bunny hop to get enough height to get into
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 22 1:35 PM
      Well, I guess "bouncing" wasn't quite the right word! I pull the fabric over to use as a chair and usually have to "bunny hop" to get enough height to get into the chair. Just sitting in the hammock and swinging back and forth will stretch the hammock out. I usually do this once or twice - I don't really *bounce* on the hammock, so poor choice of words on my part!

      So, onto your question... I suppose if I ever snapped the ridgeline in the field, I would just retie it together with a bend. If the line were so shortened by this that the sag was uncomfortable, I guess I would untie one of the ends to let out some line, so to speak. After the trip, the hammock would go back to HH for repair. All that said, these are just guesses from starting at the ridgeline while lying in the hammock. It does seem pretty thin though, but I am no where near the recommended upper weight limit of my hammock so I think I'm safe.

      Dennis

      >>> nazdarovye@... 09/22/03 04:20PM >>>
      In looking over past posts regarding loads on the hammock, and noting
      some of the suggestions about "bouncing" on the hammock to help
      stretch it out before re-tightening it, I have a question:

      So, what does happen if you snap the ridgeline on a Hennessy Hammock
      (or other make, for that matter)? I assume the hammock still hangs -
      the weight is carried mainly by the body and thick main lines - but
      what are the effects? How easy is this to do?

      More importantly: if it happens, is it "user-repairable," does it have
      to go back to the manufacturer, or does the hammock have to be taken
      out back and shot?

      I'll be curious to hear - thanks!
    • uluheman
      I ve always used my HHs (standard and ultralight) strung as tightly as possible and low to the ground, so that I m basically in a sitting in a chair
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 22 3:04 PM
        I've always used my HHs (standard and ultralight) strung as tightly
        as possible and low to the ground, so that I'm basically in
        a "sitting in a chair" position--often a low chair--when I'm sitting
        in the hammock with my feet on the ground (as happens when I enter or
        exit). And, yes, I need to tighten the hammock after getting in it
        once. I don't want my tail hitting the ground, but see no advantage
        to stringing the hammock with any more than a low chair's height of
        clearance.

        BTW, I strung up a couple of hammocks I made (Mayan style, one of
        purple "bag cloth" I got from a sailmaker and one of peacock high-
        thread-count nylon from OWF) at a celebration this weekend in a beach
        park with a view of our Windward pali (cliffs, about 2500-3000 ft
        high) and Mokoli`i island (a small cone a half mile offshore). The
        hammocks were a hit with my mostly non-backpacking friends.

        Brandon in Honolulu


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Shubitowski"
        <shubitow@c...> wrote:
        > Well, I guess "bouncing" wasn't quite the right word! I pull the
        fabric over to use as a chair and usually have to "bunny hop" to get
        enough height to get into the chair. Just sitting in the hammock and
        swinging back and forth will stretch the hammock out. I usually do
        this once or twice - I don't really *bounce* on the hammock, so poor
        choice of words on my part!
        >
        > So, onto your question... I suppose if I ever snapped the ridgeline
        in the field, I would just retie it together with a bend. If the line
        were so shortened by this that the sag was uncomfortable, I guess I
        would untie one of the ends to let out some line, so to speak. After
        the trip, the hammock would go back to HH for repair. All that said,
        these are just guesses from starting at the ridgeline while lying in
        the hammock. It does seem pretty thin though, but I am no where near
        the recommended upper weight limit of my hammock so I think I'm safe.
      • Coy
        Hi Brandon Like everything it is a trade off. I too usually hang my HH pretty low to make it easier to get in but like it as high as possible so I dont have
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 22 8:24 PM
          Hi Brandon

          Like everything it is a trade off. I too usually hang my HH pretty
          low to make it easier to get in but like it as high as possible so I
          dont have to stoop too much when Im puttering around under the fly,
          especially if it's raining. With the hammock low I dont worry so
          much about my pack getting wet either. Thats one reason I plan to
          build my own with as big a fly as possible/practable. That way I
          can have the fly with plenty of head room before I put my hammock
          under it and I can dig around in my pack for say supper and not
          worry about rain getting in. Then I can set up the hammock low for
          a chair and cook from it but when I need to stand up I wont have to
          walk around hunched over. The 8 x 10 standard fly on the speer is
          closest to what I want but I think a 10 x 12 would be worth a few
          more ounces for wet camps. Anything bigger and the wind would play
          havock with it. Bills Moss Heptawing will take a lot of wind but
          needs several tieouts if I remember correctly but might be what I
          want. I think Bill reported it at 23 oz so I would want a sil-nylon
          version. Probably cost a pretty penny to have one made but if the
          cantaliver cut was not that difficult to make it might be a good
          project. Dang, getting to many undone projects. Lets see, I want a
          double bottom Speer with netting, an under quilt and a big light
          tarp. And keep it all under 3 lbs, and closer to 2. Not asking for
          too much I dont think.

          Coy Boy

          -- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "uluheman" <UluheMan@h...>
          wrote:
          > I've always used my HHs (standard and ultralight) strung as
          tightly
          > as possible and low to the ground, so that I'm basically in
          > a "sitting in a chair" position--often a low chair--when I'm
          sitting
          > in the hammock with my feet on the ground (as happens when I enter
          or
          > exit). And, yes, I need to tighten the hammock after getting in it
          > once. I don't want my tail hitting the ground, but see no
          advantage
          > to stringing the hammock with any more than a low chair's height
          of
          > clearance.
          >
          > BTW, I strung up a couple of hammocks I made (Mayan style, one of
          > purple "bag cloth" I got from a sailmaker and one of peacock high-
          > thread-count nylon from OWF) at a celebration this weekend in a
          beach
          > park with a view of our Windward pali (cliffs, about 2500-3000 ft
          > high) and Mokoli`i island (a small cone a half mile offshore). The
          > hammocks were a hit with my mostly non-backpacking friends.
          >
          > Brandon in Honolulu
          >
          >
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Shubitowski"
          > <shubitow@c...> wrote:
          > > Well, I guess "bouncing" wasn't quite the right word! I pull the
          > fabric over to use as a chair and usually have to "bunny hop" to
          get
          > enough height to get into the chair. Just sitting in the hammock
          and
          > swinging back and forth will stretch the hammock out. I usually do
          > this once or twice - I don't really *bounce* on the hammock, so
          poor
          > choice of words on my part!
          > >
          > > So, onto your question... I suppose if I ever snapped the
          ridgeline
          > in the field, I would just retie it together with a bend. If the
          line
          > were so shortened by this that the sag was uncomfortable, I guess
          I
          > would untie one of the ends to let out some line, so to speak.
          After
          > the trip, the hammock would go back to HH for repair. All that
          said,
          > these are just guesses from starting at the ridgeline while lying
          in
          > the hammock. It does seem pretty thin though, but I am no where
          near
          > the recommended upper weight limit of my hammock so I think I'm
          safe.
        • Bill Fornshell
          Hi Coy, The Moss Heptawing does weight 23oz, but I don t remember if that counts the 8 stakes. Yes 8 lines. 1 on each end and 3 on each side. I went as far as
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 22 9:30 PM
            Hi Coy, The Moss Heptawing does weight 23oz, but I
            don't remember if that counts the 8 stakes. Yes 8
            lines. 1 on each end and 3 on each side. I went as far
            as making a plan of the tarp to see how many yards it
            would take. It I did it right it would take 8 yards
            more or less. I don't know anything about sil-nylon,
            but if the 1.3oz would work for something of this
            shape it should easily weight less than 16oz. Because
            of the strange size it might be more sewing than I
            want to try. I may try it first with some cheap
            fabric and see how that works out before I mess up 40
            or 50 dollars worth of sil-nylon. The sil-nylon tarp
            at less than 16oz and my silk hammock/bug net at 16oz
            would give you another 16oz more or less for the
            double bottom and under quilt. This might require
            some creative design work and a different material to
            keep it all under 3 pounds. Do you also need some type
            sleeping pad as a part of this setup? I have a few
            ideas and have some samples of some very light
            material "in the mail" to try some experiments with.
            As soon as I get the stuff I can do some Math and see
            how much each material would weight per yard. With the
            weight per yard I will quickly know if it is even
            possible. I think my plan would be to make a setup
            that will keep me warm down to ?? temp and then look
            at each part of it and see how to make that part as
            light as possible. For really cold weather you might
            just have to bite a 4 pound bullet. Time will tell or
            a design/material break through. Bill




            --- Coy <starnescr@...> wrote:
            > Hi Brandon
            >
            > Like everything it is a trade off. I too usually
            > hang my HH pretty
            > low to make it easier to get in but like it as high
            > as possible so I
            > dont have to stoop too much when Im puttering around
            > under the fly,
            > especially if it's raining. With the hammock low I
            > dont worry so
            > much about my pack getting wet either. Thats one
            > reason I plan to
            > build my own with as big a fly as
            > possible/practable. That way I
            > can have the fly with plenty of head room before I
            > put my hammock
            > under it and I can dig around in my pack for say
            > supper and not
            > worry about rain getting in. Then I can set up the
            > hammock low for
            > a chair and cook from it but when I need to stand up
            > I wont have to
            > walk around hunched over. The 8 x 10 standard fly
            > on the speer is
            > closest to what I want but I think a 10 x 12 would
            > be worth a few
            > more ounces for wet camps. Anything bigger and the
            > wind would play
            > havock with it. Bills Moss Heptawing will take a
            > lot of wind but
            > needs several tieouts if I remember correctly but
            > might be what I
            > want. I think Bill reported it at 23 oz so I would
            > want a sil-nylon
            > version. Probably cost a pretty penny to have one
            > made but if the
            > cantaliver cut was not that difficult to make it
            > might be a good
            > project. Dang, getting to many undone projects.
            > Lets see, I want a
            > double bottom Speer with netting, an under quilt and
            > a big light
            > tarp. And keep it all under 3 lbs, and closer to 2.
            > Not asking for
            > too much I dont think.
            >
            > Coy Boy
            >
            > -- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "uluheman"
            > <UluheMan@h...>
            > wrote:
            > > I've always used my HHs (standard and ultralight)
            > strung as
            > tightly
            > > as possible and low to the ground, so that I'm
            > basically in
            > > a "sitting in a chair" position--often a low
            > chair--when I'm
            > sitting
            > > in the hammock with my feet on the ground (as
            > happens when I enter
            > or
            > > exit). And, yes, I need to tighten the hammock
            > after getting in it
            > > once. I don't want my tail hitting the ground, but
            > see no
            > advantage
            > > to stringing the hammock with any more than a low
            > chair's height
            > of
            > > clearance.
            > >
            > > BTW, I strung up a couple of hammocks I made
            > (Mayan style, one of
            > > purple "bag cloth" I got from a sailmaker and one
            > of peacock high-
            > > thread-count nylon from OWF) at a celebration this
            > weekend in a
            > beach
            > > park with a view of our Windward pali (cliffs,
            > about 2500-3000 ft
            > > high) and Mokoli`i island (a small cone a half
            > mile offshore). The
            > > hammocks were a hit with my mostly non-backpacking
            > friends.
            > >
            > > Brandon in Honolulu
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis
            > Shubitowski"
            > > <shubitow@c...> wrote:
            > > > Well, I guess "bouncing" wasn't quite the right
            > word! I pull the
            > > fabric over to use as a chair and usually have to
            > "bunny hop" to
            > get
            > > enough height to get into the chair. Just sitting
            > in the hammock
            > and
            > > swinging back and forth will stretch the hammock
            > out. I usually do
            > > this once or twice - I don't really *bounce* on
            > the hammock, so
            > poor
            > > choice of words on my part!
            > > >
            > > > So, onto your question... I suppose if I ever
            > snapped the
            > ridgeline
            > > in the field, I would just retie it together with
            > a bend. If the
            > line
            > > were so shortened by this that the sag was
            > uncomfortable, I guess
            > I
            > > would untie one of the ends to let out some line,
            > so to speak.
            > After
            > > the trip, the hammock would go back to HH for
            > repair. All that
            > said,
            > > these are just guesses from starting at the
            > ridgeline while lying
            > in
            > > the hammock. It does seem pretty thin though, but
            > I am no where
            > near
            > > the recommended upper weight limit of my hammock
            > so I think I'm
            > safe.
            >
            >


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          • uluheman
            Coy-- Here s a fly idea for you: It seems to me that for your purposes a catenary cut fly would be counterproductive, since it will be a little higher at the
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 23 1:05 AM
              Coy--

              Here's a fly idea for you:

              It seems to me that for your purposes a catenary cut fly would be counterproductive,
              since it will be a little higher at the ends than in the middle, when you really want it to
              be low at the ends and high in the middle in order to reduce any contact between fly
              and netting and to provide good headroom.

              Since this is a fly for a hammock, which will inevitably be tied between two trees, why
              not pull UP the ridgeline of the fly with cords attached somewhat higher on the trees
              than the main cords which support the hammock and the ends of the fly? In other
              words, create a peak in the middle of the ridgeline, plus maybe one more on each
              side of the center. That would make the fly more windworthy, get it away from the
              netting, and give you more headroom for moving around under the fly when you're
              not in the hammock. Depending on the amount of peak you want, you may or may
              not need to adjust the way it's cut and sewn.

              I haven't actually done this, by the way, so the advice is worth what you paid for it.

              Brandon in Honolulu

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
              > Hi Brandon
              >
              > Like everything it is a trade off. I too usually hang my HH pretty
              > low to make it easier to get in but like it as high as possible so I
              > dont have to stoop too much when Im puttering around under the fly,
              > especially if it's raining. With the hammock low I dont worry so
              > much about my pack getting wet either. Thats one reason I plan to
              > build my own with as big a fly as possible/practable. That way I
              > can have the fly with plenty of head room before I put my hammock
              > under it and I can dig around in my pack for say supper and not
              > worry about rain getting in. Then I can set up the hammock low for
              > a chair and cook from it but when I need to stand up I wont have to
              > walk around hunched over. The 8 x 10 standard fly on the speer is
              > closest to what I want but I think a 10 x 12 would be worth a few
              > more ounces for wet camps. Anything bigger and the wind would play
              > havock with it. Bills Moss Heptawing will take a lot of wind but
              > needs several tieouts if I remember correctly but might be what I
              > want. I think Bill reported it at 23 oz so I would want a sil-nylon
              > version. Probably cost a pretty penny to have one made but if the
              > cantaliver cut was not that difficult to make it might be a good
              > project. Dang, getting to many undone projects. Lets see, I want a
              > double bottom Speer with netting, an under quilt and a big light
              > tarp. And keep it all under 3 lbs, and closer to 2. Not asking for
              > too much I dont think.
              >
              > Coy Boy
              >
            • Mirage
              Brandon, Not sure if you got my personal message, but I (and I assume others) would be very interested in any plans you may have or used to build this Mayan
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 23 10:19 AM
                Brandon,

                Not sure if you got my personal message, but I (and I assume others)
                would be very interested in any plans you may have or used to build
                this Mayan hammock. I'd love to replace my Brazillian net hammock
                that I use at home for napping and car camping w/ the family. I've
                been thinking of doing this with a parachute nylon, maybe even silk
                (thanks to those who brought that up, great idea).

                Shane "Mirage"...

                > BTW, I strung up a couple of hammocks I made (Mayan style, one of
                > purple "bag cloth" I got from a sailmaker and one of peacock high-
                > thread-count nylon from OWF) at a celebration this weekend in a
                beach
                > park with a view of our Windward pali (cliffs, about 2500-3000 ft
                > high) and Mokoli`i island (a small cone a half mile offshore). The
                > hammocks were a hit with my mostly non-backpacking friends.
                >
                > Brandon in Honolulu
              • uluheman
                Hmmmm...I replied to the list, but I don t see it appearing. Lost in the aether? Briefly, then, I ll repeat: I just hem the edges of the fabric and sew casings
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 23 7:02 PM
                  Hmmmm...I replied to the list, but I don't see it appearing. Lost in
                  the aether?

                  Briefly, then, I'll repeat:

                  I just hem the edges of the fabric and sew casings into the ends. I
                  use two or three lines of stitching to secure the casings, which are
                  about an inch wide, with the cut ends folded under. Then I run a cord
                  through the casings, knot a loop to gather up the casings on each end
                  of the hammock. That's all!

                  If you want a hammock wider than the width of the fabric, I'd suggest
                  adding a panel on either side of a central panel. The seams don't
                  stretch as much as the body of the fabric, and if there must be
                  seams, it's better if they're not in the center of the hammock.

                  Brandon in Honolulu



                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <web_dawg@y...> wrote:
                  > Brandon,
                  >
                  > Not sure if you got my personal message, but I (and I assume
                  others)
                  > would be very interested in any plans you may have or used to build
                  > this Mayan hammock. I'd love to replace my Brazillian net hammock
                  > that I use at home for napping and car camping w/ the family. I've
                  > been thinking of doing this with a parachute nylon, maybe even silk
                  > (thanks to those who brought that up, great idea).
                  >
                  > Shane "Mirage"...
                  >
                  > > BTW, I strung up a couple of hammocks I made (Mayan style, one of
                  > > purple "bag cloth" I got from a sailmaker and one of peacock high-
                  > > thread-count nylon from OWF) at a celebration this weekend in a
                  > beach
                  > > park with a view of our Windward pali (cliffs, about 2500-3000 ft
                  > > high) and Mokoli`i island (a small cone a half mile offshore).
                  The
                  > > hammocks were a hit with my mostly non-backpacking friends.
                  > >
                  > > Brandon in Honolulu
                • Coy
                  Brandon I thought about that but since the hammock also follows the same curve it might work out good. But I like your Idea of tying the center up high (and
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 24 7:01 AM
                    Brandon

                    I thought about that but since the hammock also follows the same
                    curve it might work out good. But I like your Idea of tying the
                    center up high (and keeping the peramiter edges as low as possible)
                    for the head room in the midle. But a plain retangle tarp is
                    probably the easiest and wind blown rain from the ends can be
                    handled in several ways. On possibility is to have a loop sewn on
                    at the end of the tarp (in the center) on the outside face. This
                    would be used to tie that end to the tree. The other end would be
                    identical. Then beaks would come down and have another loop to tie
                    this to a lower point on the same tree. The only problem is beaks
                    limit the angle of the tarp pitch from side to side. To expand the
                    sewn on beaks the tarp will be pulled out to a certian angle on each
                    side and if pulled lower the beak will not be tight and raised
                    higher is impossible due to the beaks. Not sure if my description
                    makes sence but hopefully it did.

                    Coy

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "uluheman" <UluheMan@h...>
                    wrote:
                    > Coy--
                    >
                    > Here's a fly idea for you:
                    >
                    > It seems to me that for your purposes a catenary cut fly would be
                    counterproductive,
                    > since it will be a little higher at the ends than in the middle,
                    when you really want it to
                    > be low at the ends and high in the middle in order to reduce any
                    contact between fly
                    > and netting and to provide good headroom.
                    >
                    > Since this is a fly for a hammock, which will inevitably be tied
                    between two trees, why
                    > not pull UP the ridgeline of the fly with cords attached somewhat
                    higher on the trees
                    > than the main cords which support the hammock and the ends of the
                    fly? In other
                    > words, create a peak in the middle of the ridgeline, plus maybe
                    one more on each
                    > side of the center. That would make the fly more windworthy, get
                    it away from the
                    > netting, and give you more headroom for moving around under the
                    fly when you're
                    > not in the hammock. Depending on the amount of peak you want, you
                    may or may
                    > not need to adjust the way it's cut and sewn.
                    >
                    > I haven't actually done this, by the way, so the advice is worth
                    what you paid for it.
                    >
                    > Brandon in Honolulu
                    >
                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...>
                    wrote:
                    > > Hi Brandon
                    > >
                    > > Like everything it is a trade off. I too usually hang my HH
                    pretty
                    > > low to make it easier to get in but like it as high as possible
                    so I
                    > > dont have to stoop too much when Im puttering around under the
                    fly,
                    > > especially if it's raining. With the hammock low I dont worry
                    so
                    > > much about my pack getting wet either. Thats one reason I plan
                    to
                    > > build my own with as big a fly as possible/practable. That way
                    I
                    > > can have the fly with plenty of head room before I put my
                    hammock
                    > > under it and I can dig around in my pack for say supper and not
                    > > worry about rain getting in. Then I can set up the hammock low
                    for
                    > > a chair and cook from it but when I need to stand up I wont have
                    to
                    > > walk around hunched over. The 8 x 10 standard fly on the speer
                    is
                    > > closest to what I want but I think a 10 x 12 would be worth a
                    few
                    > > more ounces for wet camps. Anything bigger and the wind would
                    play
                    > > havock with it. Bills Moss Heptawing will take a lot of wind
                    but
                    > > needs several tieouts if I remember correctly but might be what
                    I
                    > > want. I think Bill reported it at 23 oz so I would want a sil-
                    nylon
                    > > version. Probably cost a pretty penny to have one made but if
                    the
                    > > cantaliver cut was not that difficult to make it might be a good
                    > > project. Dang, getting to many undone projects. Lets see, I
                    want a
                    > > double bottom Speer with netting, an under quilt and a big light
                    > > tarp. And keep it all under 3 lbs, and closer to 2. Not asking
                    for
                    > > too much I dont think.
                    > >
                    > > Coy Boy
                    > >
                  • Coy
                    Hi Bill Will be interesting if yoy decide to build a light Heptawing. Keep us posted I ll tote 4 lbs if it means a warm nights rest. Ideally the system
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 24 7:14 AM
                      Hi Bill

                      Will be interesting if yoy decide to build a "light" Heptawing.
                      Keep us posted

                      I'll tote 4 lbs if it means a warm nights rest. Ideally the system
                      would be multi temp adjustable. The double bottom would work for
                      warm weather without a pad or a very light one at most. The under
                      quilt would be for cold night. Then for real COKD weather the under
                      quilt would be supplinented by either a pad between the double
                      bottom over the quilt or another quilt layer. Then ideally the top
                      cover would be a quilt also. Perhaps it to could be a multi layer
                      design too, a light one for cold weather and a medium for colder
                      weather and both for COLD weather. I probably wont be hiking long
                      distances in COLD weather so I can probably manage to tote all
                      this. Down would nake everything lighter but expensive. Unless I
                      find an old bag or coat like Ray did and salvage some down. But a
                      light under quilt and light top quilt should see me through 95% of
                      my normal hiking.

                      Coy Boy

                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Bill Fornshell
                      <bfornshell@y...> wrote:
                      > Hi Coy, The Moss Heptawing does weight 23oz, but I
                      > don't remember if that counts the 8 stakes. Yes 8
                      > lines. 1 on each end and 3 on each side. I went as far
                      > as making a plan of the tarp to see how many yards it
                      > would take. It I did it right it would take 8 yards
                      > more or less. I don't know anything about sil-nylon,
                      > but if the 1.3oz would work for something of this
                      > shape it should easily weight less than 16oz. Because
                      > of the strange size it might be more sewing than I
                      > want to try. I may try it first with some cheap
                      > fabric and see how that works out before I mess up 40
                      > or 50 dollars worth of sil-nylon. The sil-nylon tarp
                      > at less than 16oz and my silk hammock/bug net at 16oz
                      > would give you another 16oz more or less for the
                      > double bottom and under quilt. This might require
                      > some creative design work and a different material to
                      > keep it all under 3 pounds. Do you also need some type
                      > sleeping pad as a part of this setup? I have a few
                      > ideas and have some samples of some very light
                      > material "in the mail" to try some experiments with.
                      > As soon as I get the stuff I can do some Math and see
                      > how much each material would weight per yard. With the
                      > weight per yard I will quickly know if it is even
                      > possible. I think my plan would be to make a setup
                      > that will keep me warm down to ?? temp and then look
                      > at each part of it and see how to make that part as
                      > light as possible. For really cold weather you might
                      > just have to bite a 4 pound bullet. Time will tell or
                      > a design/material break through. Bill
                    • Bill Fornshell
                      Hi Coy and others, REI sells what looks like the old Tarp line from Moss. They list the Heptawing as the smaller of 3 tarps and say it is 65sq feet. This
                      Message 10 of 10 , Sep 24 9:47 AM
                        Hi Coy and others, REI sells what looks like the old
                        Tarp line from Moss. They list the Heptawing as the
                        smaller of 3 tarps and say it is 65sq feet. This would
                        be 7.2 sq yards compared to the almost 8 sq yards I
                        came up with. Using their number a tarp made of 1.1oz
                        (1.3oz) stuff might end up around 10oz. I don't know
                        much about sil-nylon and don't know if some lighter
                        material would work for a tarp. I took my tarp down
                        yesterday and I am going to make a paper pattern from
                        it sometime today. If I try to make one I think I
                        will make it a little longer, REI says it is 9' 6" end
                        to end and if I am not in the Hammock the ends are
                        almost the same length. In the rain the ends could
                        get wet until you get into it. Once in the Hammock
                        the weight makes it shorter and the ends are well
                        under the tarp. If I make a tarp I think I would add
                        a foot or more to the end to end length and this
                        problem would go away.

                        I liked the article about the "Down Underquilt for
                        Hennessy Hammocks" but it looks a little more
                        complicate than something I might be able to sew. I
                        also have an old Army Down sleeping bag that I have
                        saved over the years thinking the Down might be
                        recycled into something else some day.

                        There has to be some "low temperature/ weight of
                        winter hammock set-up" ratio that once you get to it
                        you sleep some other way or go home??

                        How much weight are you willing to carry to sleep in a
                        Hammock in Cold weather?? (Your clothing can add to
                        your warmth but that also might add to your carrying
                        weight). I think a Hammock warm down to around 20
                        degrees is about as low as I would want to be in one.
                        After that I might drop the Hammock to the ground and
                        use it like a tarp/tent something. It seldom gets
                        that cold here in South Texas and to test any cold
                        weather set-up I would have to travel to a colder
                        area.

                        I have wanted to do some winter hiking on the AT so if
                        I can make something that might work it would give me
                        a good reason to travel up to GA this winter. Bill



                        --- Coy <starnescr@...> wrote:
                        > Hi Bill
                        >
                        > Will be interesting if yoy decide to build a "light"
                        > Heptawing.
                        > Keep us posted
                        >
                        > I'll tote 4 lbs if it means a warm nights rest.
                        > Ideally the system
                        > would be multi temp adjustable. The double bottom
                        > would work for
                        > warm weather without a pad or a very light one at
                        > most. The under
                        > quilt would be for cold night. Then for real COKD
                        > weather the under
                        > quilt would be supplinented by either a pad between
                        > the double
                        > bottom over the quilt or another quilt layer. Then
                        > ideally the top
                        > cover would be a quilt also. Perhaps it to could be
                        > a multi layer
                        > design too, a light one for cold weather and a
                        > medium for colder
                        > weather and both for COLD weather. I probably wont
                        > be hiking long
                        > distances in COLD weather so I can probably manage
                        > to tote all
                        > this. Down would nake everything lighter but
                        > expensive. Unless I
                        > find an old bag or coat like Ray did and salvage
                        > some down. But a
                        > light under quilt and light top quilt should see me
                        > through 95% of
                        > my normal hiking.
                        >
                        > Coy Boy
                        >
                        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Bill
                        > Fornshell
                        > <bfornshell@y...> wrote:
                        > > Hi Coy, The Moss Heptawing does weight 23oz, but I
                        > > don't remember if that counts the 8 stakes. Yes 8
                        > > lines. 1 on each end and 3 on each side. I went as
                        > far
                        > > as making a plan of the tarp to see how many yards
                        > it
                        > > would take. It I did it right it would take 8
                        > yards
                        > > more or less. I don't know anything about
                        > sil-nylon,
                        > > but if the 1.3oz would work for something of this
                        > > shape it should easily weight less than 16oz.
                        > Because
                        > > of the strange size it might be more sewing than I
                        > > want to try. I may try it first with some cheap
                        > > fabric and see how that works out before I mess up
                        > 40
                        > > or 50 dollars worth of sil-nylon. The sil-nylon
                        > tarp
                        > > at less than 16oz and my silk hammock/bug net at
                        > 16oz
                        > > would give you another 16oz more or less for the
                        > > double bottom and under quilt. This might require
                        > > some creative design work and a different material
                        > to
                        > > keep it all under 3 pounds. Do you also need some
                        > type
                        > > sleeping pad as a part of this setup? I have a few
                        > > ideas and have some samples of some very light
                        > > material "in the mail" to try some experiments
                        > with.
                        > > As soon as I get the stuff I can do some Math and
                        > see
                        > > how much each material would weight per yard. With
                        > the
                        > > weight per yard I will quickly know if it is even
                        > > possible. I think my plan would be to make a setup
                        > > that will keep me warm down to ?? temp and then
                        > look
                        > > at each part of it and see how to make that part
                        > as
                        > > light as possible. For really cold weather you
                        > might
                        > > just have to bite a 4 pound bullet. Time will
                        > tell or
                        > > a design/material break through. Bill
                        >
                        >


                        =====
                        Bill Fornshell
                        Founder and President
                        Cold Mountain Chanoyu
                        (Tea School for the New Millennium)
                        School of One
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ColdMtnChado

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