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Insulator for the Hennessey Hammock

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  • rgarling <rgarling@yahoo.com>
    Here is a device I ve been working on for insulating the bottom of the Hennessey Hammock in cool or cold conditions.
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 24, 2003
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      Here is a device I've been working on for insulating the bottom of the
      Hennessey Hammock in cool or cold conditions.

      http://www.mindspring.com/~rgarling/Insulator.htm

      For the 'final' product, I'd recommend 30 d sil-nylon. With the
      drawstrings, that would weigh about 9 oz. The plastic bag would weigh
      in about 4 oz. or less depending on thickness. you would also have to
      bring some tape to patch holes. I'd estimate about 14oz for the whole
      thing.

      Performance:

      Last night was some very cold weather here in NC and yielded the
      coldest temps I've tried the HH in so far. The ambient temp was 13* F
      and breezy. I dressed in fleece, inside a FF rock wren bag. Inside the
      hammock after temps stabilized, the temp was 33*F on the surface of
      the sleeping bag, so there was about a 20*F warmup above ambient. My
      back was not cold, but there was a slight coolness that I didn't care
      for. Subjectively, this was more comfortable than 40*F with
      no insulation in the hammock. Also, its probably better than 28* and a
      truck windscreen pad plus my a 1/4" closed cell foam pad (but I'd have
      to spend the night to be sure).

      possible improvements:
      Maybe a survival blanket thrown on top of the air bags would help.
      Also, I carry a 30x40x1/4" foam pad in case I sleep in a shelter. I'd
      use that inside the hammock, which would certainly take care of the
      problem.


      http://www.mindspring.com/~rgarling/Insulator.gif
    • starnescr <starnescr@yahoo.com>
      Thanks ( rgarling) I like how you made a pulley system to pull the under quilt after entry. Do the garbage bags filled with a little air help that much, or
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 24, 2003
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        Thanks ( rgarling)

        I like how you made a pulley system to pull the under quilt after
        entry. Do the garbage bags filled with a little air help that much,
        or would a fleece blanket or light quilt (like the pea pod) work
        much better. I would place the reflector under whatever I placed on
        top of the silynylon. Or even replace the silnylon with a reflector.
        Problem is the cheap emergency blankets are too flimsy and the heavy
        duty space blankets are too heavy. Someone should make a compromise
        in between space blanket.

        If this dont work you can always start a fire (nice looking woodpile
        you have there)

        Coy Boy

        -- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "rgarling <rgarling@y...>"
        <rgarling@y...> wrote:
        > Here is a device I've been working on for insulating the bottom of
        the
        > Hennessey Hammock in cool or cold conditions.
        >
        > http://www.mindspring.com/~rgarling/Insulator.htm
        >
        > For the 'final' product, I'd recommend 30 d sil-nylon. With the
        > drawstrings, that would weigh about 9 oz. The plastic bag would
        weigh
        > in about 4 oz. or less depending on thickness. you would also have
        to
        > bring some tape to patch holes. I'd estimate about 14oz for the
        whole
        > thing.
        >
        > Performance:
        >
        > Last night was some very cold weather here in NC and yielded the
        > coldest temps I've tried the HH in so far. The ambient temp was
        13* F
        > and breezy. I dressed in fleece, inside a FF rock wren bag. Inside
        the
        > hammock after temps stabilized, the temp was 33*F on the surface
        of
        > the sleeping bag, so there was about a 20*F warmup above ambient.
        My
        > back was not cold, but there was a slight coolness that I didn't
        care
        > for. Subjectively, this was more comfortable than 40*F with
        > no insulation in the hammock. Also, its probably better than 28*
        and a
        > truck windscreen pad plus my a 1/4" closed cell foam pad (but I'd
        have
        > to spend the night to be sure).
        >
        > possible improvements:
        > Maybe a survival blanket thrown on top of the air bags would help.
        > Also, I carry a 30x40x1/4" foam pad in case I sleep in a shelter.
        I'd
        > use that inside the hammock, which would certainly take care of
        the
        > problem.
        >
        >
        > http://www.mindspring.com/~rgarling/Insulator.gif
      • David Chinell
        Looks good to me. Even more important, it s simple enough to be useful. But what are the actual dimensions and shape of the material? I gather it s 9 feet
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 24, 2003
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          Looks good to me. Even more important, it's simple enough to
          be useful. But what are the actual dimensions and shape of
          the material? I gather it's 9 feet long, but is it a
          rectangle? If so, how wide?

          Bear
        • rgarling <rgarling@yahoo.com>
          ... Yes, the air bags work surprisingly well are very light and pack small. I tried no insulation (just the shell), synthetic insulation (a sleeping bag),
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 24, 2003
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            > Do the garbage bags filled with a little air help that much,
            > or would a fleece blanket or light quilt (like the pea pod) work
            > much better.
            Yes, the air bags work surprisingly well are very light and pack
            small. I tried no insulation (just the shell), synthetic insulation
            (a sleeping bag), down (a sleeping bag) and the air bags. The
            sleeping bags worked well, but are too bulky and heavy to carry.
            So, other things are warmer, but the airbags work well by themselves.
          • rgarling <rgarling@yahoo.com>
            ... wide? Yes, it is just a rectangle. I used the material just as it came off the bolt of fabric. (usually 58 or 60 inches wide)
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 24, 2003
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              >>> I gather it's 9 feet long, but is it a rectangle? If so, how
              wide?


              Yes, it is just a rectangle. I used the material just as it came off
              the bolt of fabric. (usually 58 or 60 inches wide)
            • Bud Cragar
              (((I d recommend 30 d sil-nylon))) Any thoughts on using tyvex. I usually carry a tyvex groundsheet and could easily rig it for your system. ... From: rgarling
              Message 6 of 8 , Jan 24, 2003
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                (((I'd recommend 30 d sil-nylon)))
                 
                Any thoughts on using tyvex. I usually carry a tyvex groundsheet and could easily rig it for your system.
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Friday, January 24, 2003 8:14 AM
                Subject: Hammock Camping Insulator for the Hennessey Hammock

                Here is a device I've been working on for insulating the bottom of the
                Hennessey Hammock in cool or cold conditions.

                http://www.mindspring.com/~rgarling/Insulator.htm

                For the 'final' product, I'd recommend 30 d sil-nylon. With the
                drawstrings, that would weigh about 9 oz. The plastic bag would weigh
                in about 4 oz. or less depending on thickness. you would also have to
                bring some tape to patch holes. I'd estimate about 14oz for the whole
                thing.

                Performance:

                Last night was some very cold weather here in NC and yielded the
                coldest temps I've tried the HH in so far.  The ambient temp was 13* F
                and breezy. I dressed in fleece, inside a FF rock wren bag. Inside the
                hammock after temps stabilized, the temp was 33*F on the surface of
                the sleeping bag, so there was about a 20*F warmup above ambient.  My
                back was not cold, but there was a slight coolness that I didn't care
                for. Subjectively, this was more comfortable than 40*F with
                no insulation in the hammock. Also, its probably better than 28* and a
                truck windscreen pad plus my a 1/4" closed cell foam pad (but I'd have
                to spend the night to be sure).

                possible improvements:
                Maybe a survival blanket thrown on top of the air bags would help.
                Also, I carry a 30x40x1/4" foam pad in case I sleep in a shelter. I'd
                use that inside the hammock, which would certainly take care of the
                problem.

                                       
                http://www.mindspring.com/~rgarling/Insulator.gif



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              • rgarling <rgarling@yahoo.com>
                ... I think the characteristics you want for the shell are light weight, windproof and waterproof. Tyvek meets those requirements. In fact, since it comes in
                Message 7 of 8 , Jan 24, 2003
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                  > Any thoughts on using tyvex.

                  I think the characteristics you want for the shell are light weight,
                  windproof and waterproof. Tyvek meets those requirements. In fact,
                  since it comes in wider sizes, you could fashion it so that it covers
                  as much of the hammock's netting as you wanted. I was constrained by
                  the 60" width of the fabric and my inability to sew.
                • Ed Speer
                  A neat idea! I ve added your link to our LINKS section under How To Stay Warm; hope you don t mind. To see our selected links go to our home page and click
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jan 27, 2003
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                    Message
                    A neat idea!  I've added your link to our LINKS section under How To Stay Warm; hope you don't mind.  To see our selected links go to our home page and click LINKS on the left side of the page. The Links are just getting started.
                     
                    I've used dry leaves in sealed trash bags to under-pin my sister's mobil home for winter time use. They worked extremely well for several years!  Also used leaves inside my PeaPod insulated sleeping bag around my hammock.  Would your setup also accept leaves, or would they get pushed out?
                     
                    Of course, leaves are not always available.  Your use of partially-air-filled trash bags is very creative--way to go! 
                     
                    As you suggest, a mylar survival blanket would add some warmth inside the hammock (about 5-10 degrees).  However, the mylar will not help the bottom heat loss due to conduction that you noticed (only more insulation will do that).  Please keep us informed of your progress....Ed
                    Here is a device I've been working on for insulating the bottom of the
                    Hennessey Hammock in cool or cold conditions.

                    http://www.mindspring.com/~rgarling/Insulator.htm

                    For the 'final' product, I'd recommend 30 d sil-nylon. With the
                    drawstrings, that would weigh about 9 oz. The plastic bag would weigh
                    in about 4 oz. or less depending on thickness. you would also have to
                    bring some tape to patch holes. I'd estimate about 14oz for the whole
                    thing.

                    Performance:

                    Last night was some very cold weather here in NC and yielded the
                    coldest temps I've tried the HH in so far.  The ambient temp was 13* F
                    and breezy. I dressed in fleece, inside a FF rock wren bag. Inside the
                    hammock after temps stabilized, the temp was 33*F on the surface of
                    the sleeping bag, so there was about a 20*F warmup above ambient.  My
                    back was not cold, but there was a slight coolness that I didn't care
                    for. Subjectively, this was more comfortable than 40*F with
                    no insulation in the hammock. Also, its probably better than 28* and a
                    truck windscreen pad plus my a 1/4" closed cell foam pad (but I'd have
                    to spend the night to be sure).

                    possible improvements:
                    Maybe a survival blanket thrown on top of the air bags would help.
                    Also, I carry a 30x40x1/4" foam pad in case I sleep in a shelter. I'd
                    use that inside the hammock, which would certainly take care of the
                    problem.

                                           
                    http://www.mindspring.com/~rgarling/Insulator.gif



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