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insulation

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  • SG
    Does anyone know if Home Depot in the Atlanta area carries ReflecTech material? Those of you who have used this material-- 1. Was there a condensation issue?
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 15, 2003
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      Does anyone know if Home Depot in the Atlanta area carries ReflecTech
      material?

      Those of you who have used this material--
      1. Was there a condensation issue?
      2. If yes, did you come up with a solution?

      Thanks
      Steve
    • Dave Womble
      Steve, I didn t find Reflectix at the Home Depots near me in NE Atlanta, but I did find it at Lowe s. The 2 foot wide stuff comes in a 25 foot roll. I am not
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 15, 2003
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        Steve,

        I didn't find Reflectix at the Home Depots near me in NE Atlanta, but
        I did find it at Lowe's. The 2 foot wide stuff comes in a 25 foot
        roll. I am not sure that it is any better than solid closed cell
        foam for hammock insulation and I think condensation will be an issue
        with any waterproof insulation unless you have some 'wicking fabric'
        between you and the waterproof insulation. You also might want to
        check out Ed Speer's site at www.speerhammocks.com as he does sell it
        by the piece.

        Youngblood

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "SG" <stgga@y...> wrote:
        > Does anyone know if Home Depot in the Atlanta area carries
        ReflecTech
        > material?
        >
        > Those of you who have used this material--
        > 1. Was there a condensation issue?
        > 2. If yes, did you come up with a solution?
        >
        > Thanks
        > Steve
      • amy
        ... In the winter I use a Reflectix setup. I duct-taped together three pieces and then trimmed it down so it s in a coffin-like shape. It extends out at my
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 16, 2003
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          On Monday, September 15, 2003, at 03:35 PM, Dave Womble wrote:

          >
          >
          > I didn't find Reflectix at the Home Depots near me in NE Atlanta, but
          > I did find it at Lowe's. The 2 foot wide stuff comes in a 25 foot
          > roll. I am not sure that it is any better than solid closed cell
          > foam for hammock insulation and I think condensation will be an issue
          > with any waterproof insulation unless you have some 'wicking fabric'
          > between you and the waterproof insulation. You also might want to
          > check out Ed Speer's site at www.speerhammocks.com as he does sell it
          > by the piece.
          >

          In the winter I use a Reflectix setup. I duct-taped together three
          pieces
          and then trimmed it down so it's in a coffin-like shape. It extends out
          at my shoulders down to my knees, and then comes in to my feet.
          I stitched some fleece to it with dental floss. The sides fold in for
          when I roll it up.

          It's useful to me because it's wide and the fleece feels warm on my
          skin,
          but my closed cell foam insulation is warmer. The reflectix does
          cut the wind. In weather of about 35 degrees and below, I use the
          reflectix with closed cell foam. In five degree weather last year I
          used reflectix and *two* closed cell foam sheets. It may have been
          overkill. I was utterly warm and toasty except for my nose.

          Over about 35 to the lower 50's I use closed cell foam in the hammock,
          and a space blanket on the outside with a few airbags stuffed between
          the hammock and the space blanket. 50's and above I just use
          the foam. I think I've only spent one night in the hammock where it
          was so warm I didn't use a foam pad.

          My reflectix has not aged well. Every time I use it I find little
          aluminum
          flakes all over the inside of the hammock. I can't tell if that is
          affecting
          how warm it is or not.

          -amy
        • jkneilson
          Hi all, I have an 8.0 A Speers hammock, a 15-degree rated bag, and a full-length RidgeRest. At what temperature would I need additional insulation? Cheers, K
          Message 4 of 8 , May 15, 2006
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            Hi all, I have an 8.0 A Speers hammock, a 15-degree rated bag, and a
            full-length RidgeRest. At what temperature would I need additional
            insulation?

            Cheers, K
          • Coy
            first congradulations on the new hammock (saw earlier post) just in general i d say around 25 F but I d have to see you and your setup to make a more educated
            Message 5 of 8 , May 15, 2006
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              first congradulations on the new hammock (saw earlier post)

              just in general i'd say around 25 F but I'd have to see you and your
              setup to make a more educated guess. Jeff has some info on differant
              pads and Dave published a list of R values somewhere. I'd look at
              those first. So Dave and jeff, spill the beans.

              BTW a lot depends on the bag, how new it is, especially synthetics
              which lose more lofting power than down bags. Even ccp degrade and
              compress over time. Then you have to look at yourself. are you big
              or little, old or young, tend to sleep warm or cold. etc.

              the best method is to go out in a safe place where you can bail and
              find the limits of your gear. this could be the backyard or somewhere
              you can safely hike back to the car in the dark if needed.

              Coy Boy

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jkneilson" <jkneilson@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Hi all, I have an 8.0 A Speers hammock, a 15-degree rated bag, and a
              > full-length RidgeRest. At what temperature would I need additional
              > insulation?
              >
              > Cheers, K
              >
            • jwj32542
              ... http://www.tothewoods.net/HammockCampingWarm.html http://www.hammockcamping.com/Tips/Tips.htm#Staying Dave s R-value chart is on Ed s SPE page:
              Message 6 of 8 , May 15, 2006
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                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@...> wrote:
                > So Dave and jeff, spill the beans.

                http://www.tothewoods.net/HammockCampingWarm.html

                http://www.hammockcamping.com/Tips/Tips.htm#Staying

                Dave's R-value chart is on Ed's SPE page:
                http://speerhammocks.com/Products/SPE.htm

                If you're set on using a pad, a SPE is definitely a worthy
                investment. Unlike sleeping on the ground, the hammock will
                compress the insulation at your shoulders and hips, causing cold
                spots. The SPE is one way to fix this.

                Otherwise, just be sure to test. If you're hiking into conditions
                that you're not sure about, bring extra insulation...an extra bag
                that you can add while you're testing the current setup, an extra
                CCF pad to put under your TR, a way to go to ground (you'll already
                have a tarp), etc. But it's definitely best to test somewhere with
                an easy bailout plan if things get too uncomfortable.

                You came to the right place with questions - everyone here is very
                nice and willing to help, so ask away.

                Jeff
              • Dave Womble
                ... I wrote an article about staying warm in hammocks that Ed Speer included in his Jan 2006 newletter, it is chapter 2 at this link: http://tinyurl.com/epsap
                Message 7 of 8 , May 15, 2006
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                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jwj32542" <jwj32542@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@> wrote:
                  > > So Dave and jeff, spill the beans.
                  >
                  > http://www.tothewoods.net/HammockCampingWarm.html
                  >
                  > http://www.hammockcamping.com/Tips/Tips.htm#Staying
                  >
                  > Dave's R-value chart is on Ed's SPE page:
                  > http://speerhammocks.com/Products/SPE.htm
                  >
                  > If you're set on using a pad, a SPE is definitely a worthy
                  > investment. Unlike sleeping on the ground, the hammock will
                  > compress the insulation at your shoulders and hips, causing cold
                  > spots. The SPE is one way to fix this.
                  >
                  > Otherwise, just be sure to test. If you're hiking into conditions
                  > that you're not sure about, bring extra insulation...an extra bag
                  > that you can add while you're testing the current setup, an extra
                  > CCF pad to put under your TR, a way to go to ground (you'll already
                  > have a tarp), etc. But it's definitely best to test somewhere with
                  > an easy bailout plan if things get too uncomfortable.
                  >
                  > You came to the right place with questions - everyone here is very
                  > nice and willing to help, so ask away.
                  >
                  > Jeff
                  >

                  I wrote an article about staying warm in hammocks that Ed Speer
                  included in his Jan 2006 newletter, it is chapter 2 at this link:
                  http://tinyurl.com/epsap . Good luck with it.

                  Dave
                • chcoa
                  Hi K, It depends on how cold/warm you sleep, your clothing and what s going on outside of your set up. I have a simular set up to yours (15 F bag and a closed
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 15, 2006
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                    Hi K,

                    It depends on how cold/warm you sleep, your clothing and what's going
                    on outside of your set up. I have a simular set up to yours (15 F bag
                    and a closed cell foam pad) that I have been comfortable using down to
                    just above freezing, but I'm somewhat of a cold sleeper.

                    You really need to experiment near home or while car camping so you
                    can bring extra stuff in case you are way off.

                    best of luck, let us know how it goes.
                    jamie in az

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jkneilson" <jkneilson@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi all, I have an 8.0 A Speers hammock, a 15-degree rated bag, and a
                    > full-length RidgeRest. At what temperature would I need additional
                    > insulation?
                    >
                    > Cheers, K
                    >
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