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Hammock Camping Re: Oh Boy, Cold Wars II, winding up!

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  • o123david
    Rick, ... Your description of closed-cell foam is great. The question I still have is about how effectively the foam blocks the wind. For instance, Tyvek
    Message 1 of 57 , Sep 7, 2003
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      Rick,
      >the physics of the materials does not allow the air molecules in that
      >wind to penetrate the foam.

      Your description of closed-cell foam is great. The question I still
      have is about how effectively the foam blocks the wind. For instance,
      Tyvek blocks the wind but the commercial version of Tyvek blocks it
      seven times better than the home version.

      I'm going on memories from last year which may not be totally
      correct, but what I am certain about is that the cold came through
      the pad. To some extent this would be caused by the fact that the
      wind prevented the air that is right up against one side of the pad
      from retaining a significant amount of heat and therefore reduced the
      insulating value of the combination of pad and surrounding air. My
      guess, based on the extent to which the pad lost its ability to
      insulate, is that it is also because the cold wind managed to
      penetrate at least part way into the pad.

      >My experience with thin pads is that whenever wind is blowing the
      >skin on my back cools and it may even feel like the wind is coming
      >through the pad... But it is not. I have proved that by creating
      >an air tight chamber out of closed cell foam. Even under pressure,
      >air does not get through the closed cell.

      How do you explain what sounds like a significant loss in insulating
      value of your chamber of closed cell foam when it gets windy?
      Do you really think the loss can be fully explained by the removal of
      the dead air that surrounded the chamber before the wind increased?

      >Your idea of a tent like chamber beneath the hammock has a lot of
      >merit in that it can keep cold air from blowing across the hammock.
      >However, it has the problem that it can be a large volume.

      The tent that I described has approximately the same design and
      volume as Stephenson's Warmlite tent (but without the poles). In my
      experience and based on the measurements of others I am sure that in
      cold weather it is considerably warmer inside than out.
      But I am not going to build one, for the same reasons that out west I
      use a tarp instead of a Henry Shires tarptent. The alternative has
      definite advantages, but I prefer a simpler lighter shelter that does
      less to separate me from the surroundings.

      What do you think of the idea of building a hammock from three
      parallel lengthwise strips of material, with the middle strip
      uncoated? Do you think it would work to both block the wind and
      prevent significant condensation?

      Thank you for your response. --David
    • Thomas Peltier
      Looks very nice. _____ From: Chet Clocksin [mailto:cclocksin@buckeye-express.com] Sent: Friday, September 12, 2003 5:55 AM To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com I
      Message 57 of 57 , Sep 12, 2003
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        Looks very nice.

         

         


        From: Chet Clocksin [mailto:cclocksin@...]
        Sent: Friday, September 12, 2003 5:55 AM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

         

        I just posted another photo in "chet's home made" folder (I also deleted a few) Take a look at the last photo in the folder. A dog could be very cozy in there, and provide some additional heat. This set-up should also be a true storm proof set-up simply by closing the "doors" at the bottom.

         

        Chet

        -----Original Message-----
        From: chcoa [mailto:jdeben@...]
        Sent: Friday, September 12, 2003 2:25 AM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Hammock Camping Oh Boy, Cold Wars II, Doggie heater

        The ground in more what I was thinking for several reasons, material
        strength, warmth, etc.. but you are right they could hang a little
        too.  My only concern with this idea is that in the night if for some
        weird reason the hammock malfunctioned and I fell on her.  I wouldn't
        want to do that of course!  ACK!

        jamie in az

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Garlington"
        <rgarling@y...> wrote:

        > This is a really good idea.  An open-bottom cone could be staked to
        > the ground with a side entry hole for the dog.  He would have a
        nice
        > house separate from your sleeping quarters & he could contribute
        some
        > heat.  Much better than tenting with a wet dog!
        >
        > If the dog was 'hammock trained', you could have a closed-bottom
        cone
        > with a side entry for the dog.  He would then be suspended above
        the
        > ground.



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