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Hammock Camping Re: Oh Boy, Cold Wars II, winding up!

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  • Dave Womble
    ... Heat ... across ... by ... more ... While I am talking about this let me add this. When the wind blows and removes the layer of insulating dead air on
    Message 1 of 57 , Sep 7, 2003
      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
      wrote:
      > David,
      >
      > Rick is right about the wind not penetrating closed cell foam.
      Heat
      > transfer on a detailed basics can be difficult to understand. You
      > are absolutely right about it being cooler when the wind blows
      across
      > your insulation. Without the wind the convection heat transfer is
      by
      > a process caused natural convection, which occurs because the warm
      > air rises and is displaced by cooler air. When the wind blows, the
      > process is called forced convection and is a much more efficient
      > means of heat transfer than natural convection because it moves
      more
      > air and moves it quicker, effectively removing your layer of
      > insulating 'dead air'.
      >
      > Youngblood
      >
      >
      While I am talking about this let me add this. When the wind blows
      and removes the layer of insulating 'dead air' on the outer surface
      of your insulation, a quick cooling effect is sometimes noticed even
      though you're insulated by a wind-proof insulation. This is because
      the conductive heat transfer rate changes-- conductive heat transfer
      is proportional to the temperature differential between the two
      surfaces of the insulation and since the outer surface temperature
      changes due to the wind and its associated force convection heat
      transfer, the inner surface temperature will also change because of
      conductive heat transfer. How fast & how much are determined by the
      temperatue differential and how much insulation you have (i.e. R-
      value, thickness, material type, etc.). In cases where you are using
      marginal insulation, you will very much notice the effects of the
      wind. In cases where you have more insulation, you will notice the
      effects less and with enough insulation you won't notice it at all.
      But even in the cases where you are using enough insulation to not
      notice it all, the effect of the wind on convection heat transfer and
      conductive heat transfer is still there... the wind is just not
      blowing hard enough or it is not cold enough for it to bother you...
      at least not yet!

      I think this is pretty much what Rick described, just another
      description of the same processes. For those that had forgotten,
      convective heat transfer is with fluids (liquids & gases-- in this
      case air) and conductive heat transfer is with solids (your
      insulating pads). Like I have said before, the detail of heat
      transfer can be very difficult to understand. One of the many
      reasons for that is that it can change back and forth between the
      three primary types that we deal with when we try to stay warm in our
      hammocks-- radiant heat transfer, conductive heat transfer and
      convective heat transfer. And then there is the complication that
      our heat source, our bodies, doen't always perform uniformly.

      Youngblood
    • Thomas Peltier
      Looks very nice. _____ From: Chet Clocksin [mailto:cclocksin@buckeye-express.com] Sent: Friday, September 12, 2003 5:55 AM To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com I
      Message 57 of 57 , Sep 12, 2003

        Looks very nice.

         

         


        From: Chet Clocksin [mailto:cclocksin@...]
        Sent: Friday, September 12, 2003 5:55 AM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

         

        I just posted another photo in "chet's home made" folder (I also deleted a few) Take a look at the last photo in the folder. A dog could be very cozy in there, and provide some additional heat. This set-up should also be a true storm proof set-up simply by closing the "doors" at the bottom.

         

        Chet

        -----Original Message-----
        From: chcoa [mailto:jdeben@...]
        Sent: Friday, September 12, 2003 2:25 AM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Hammock Camping Oh Boy, Cold Wars II, Doggie heater

        The ground in more what I was thinking for several reasons, material
        strength, warmth, etc.. but you are right they could hang a little
        too.  My only concern with this idea is that in the night if for some
        weird reason the hammock malfunctioned and I fell on her.  I wouldn't
        want to do that of course!  ACK!

        jamie in az

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Garlington"
        <rgarling@y...> wrote:

        > This is a really good idea.  An open-bottom cone could be staked to
        > the ground with a side entry hole for the dog.  He would have a
        nice
        > house separate from your sleeping quarters & he could contribute
        some
        > heat.  Much better than tenting with a wet dog!
        >
        > If the dog was 'hammock trained', you could have a closed-bottom
        cone
        > with a side entry for the dog.  He would then be suspended above
        the
        > ground.



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