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Re: heat loss explanation

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  • Coy
    From what I ve read on various sites, Stevenson Warmlite etc vapor bariers are real tricky. I tend to view them as a good tool to have as a standby but not
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 2, 2003
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      From what I've read on various sites, Stevenson Warmlite etc vapor
      bariers are real tricky. I tend to view them as a good tool to have
      as a standby but not for general everyday camping. In an artic
      enviorment I could see a real benifit as it would keep your
      insulation dry from your own moisture. To me the best solutoin is
      to sleep with just enough insulation to be comfortable but avoid
      overheating at all cost. Tough to do in mid summer but easier in a
      hammock. In the winter keeping warm on the bottom side is the
      biggest challenge and a vapor barier wont help much in that
      reguard. I would be courious as to any experimenting though.

      Coy Boy



      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "simva4040" <simva4040@y...>
      wrote:
      > That was an excellent explanation of heat loss versus cold
      > gain....now how about a discussion on vapor barriers and their
      > application in hammocking....I use a pack liner that is also a
      whole
      > body vapor barrier, I carry it because you never know when you may
      > need to treat someone for shock or have an extra sleeping bag
      (with
      > the addition of garbage bags filled with leaves/etc.)and as the
      > obvious pack liner. Surely most here are studied in the merits of
      > vapor barriers in extreme cold--but what about their use in the
      > HH,Spear, and other hammock?
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