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Oh Boy, Cold Wars II, winding up!

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  • Risk
    It s the time of year, I guess. School just started. Someplace in the back of our brains, the notion of COLD is beginning to sink in. It s still hot as
    Message 1 of 57 , Aug 30, 2003
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      It's the time of year, I guess. School just started. Someplace in
      the back of our brains, the notion of COLD is beginning to sink in.
      It's still hot as blazes, but there are some hints of the coming
      season. Some of the leaves are falling from the trees. And questions
      about keeping warm are becoming more frequent.

      I think we are going to have a fun season working to defeat the
      adversary of a cold back at 3 AM!

      First, a short report on the VERY wide pad I built yesterday: It
      works. It keeps me warm. No cold shoulders, no cold knees. Last
      night we had a series of rain showers with winds about 15-25 mph come
      though. It gently rocked me to sleep. The pad felt great and I have
      never had such a nice night's sleep in a hammock... and that is
      compared with a lot of nights. If I can figure out a way to easily
      pack the thing, it is worth the extra 2 oz. More details to follow...
      just a teaser for now.

      For the questions:

      Jamie asks:

      >What results have you all had using a pad for
      insulation and using an under quilt?

      I have used several versions of the Garlington Insulator and the
      derivitive Taco Shell. I have not yet used a quilt, though I plan on
      building a derivitive of Ed's Pea Pod this fall. In my plan, it will
      be the inverse of a Big Agnes. It will have no insulation above, all
      will be below. I intend a simple tube that is put on the hammock
      before the line is tied to the tree. The bottom of the tube will be
      insulated with polar guard. The top will be a layer of 1.1oz nylon.

      I have lots of experience with several different pads. They all work
      well. The stiffer they are, the more irritating are the folds that
      bend into them along their margin as they bend into the hammock shape.

      >I'd like to know the temps as well.

      I have needed a pad for all temps below 80. With two pads and a
      Garlington Insulator, I slept through a 5 F (-15 C) night with blustry
      winds last winter.

      >I'm trying to decide weather to pursue the pad option or just
      make an under quilt. ANy info. is appreciated

      Ah..., simple answer is to try both. Pad options are a lot cheaper,
      lighter, and easier. There are conditions when both are necessary.

      >And also: Has anyone used the 5/8 pad in comparison to the 3/8 and
      what were your results? Is it overkill? Aslo, down to what temps
      have we had success with either pad size? Finally, is there an
      advantage to using the flat pads as opposed to the ones that are
      bumpy or ridged? I'd also like to know if you are using your pad in
      the hammock or under.

      Last winter's experiments were made with pads inside the hammock.
      Since then, I have been using a double bottomed hammock built to hold
      a pad between two layers... My version is called the Quarterweight
      hammock and has been described in detail here... I find materials
      very important in staying warm. 5/8 is not overkill. WalMart has a
      nice waffle weave pad that is quite thick. For real winter, it is a
      godsend, either alone, or inside another wider pad. I like the Target
      pad material because it stretches a lot and compresses a lot before it
      folds. And the folds are not as hard as with many materials. It also
      does not seem to be a closed cell foam, as it will slowly get wet (in
      the bottom of a wet pack) and takes a while to dry.


      Carol Asks:
      >Which is better, the REI or Target pad? I have both in my house now
      and can't tell just by looking. I like the feel of the REI pad better,
      but it's an ounce heavier.

      Much like the above, Carol, just try them one at a time in several
      temperature ranges. The Target pad, alone, is only good to about
      freezing. After that, I need more insulation... either a second pad,
      or a thicker pad, or some fleece clothing, or something.

      I'd also like to mention Medicine Man's complete post just above. I
      enjoyed reading it. I look forward to his work this winter. The new
      down underquilt sounds very interesting.

      Rick
    • Thomas Peltier
      Looks very nice. _____ From: Chet Clocksin [mailto:cclocksin@buckeye-express.com] Sent: Friday, September 12, 2003 5:55 AM To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com I
      Message 57 of 57 , Sep 12, 2003
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        Looks very nice.

         

         


        From: Chet Clocksin [mailto:cclocksin@...]
        Sent: Friday, September 12, 2003 5:55 AM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

         

        I just posted another photo in "chet's home made" folder (I also deleted a few) Take a look at the last photo in the folder. A dog could be very cozy in there, and provide some additional heat. This set-up should also be a true storm proof set-up simply by closing the "doors" at the bottom.

         

        Chet

        -----Original Message-----
        From: chcoa [mailto:jdeben@...]
        Sent: Friday, September 12, 2003 2:25 AM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Hammock Camping Oh Boy, Cold Wars II, Doggie heater

        The ground in more what I was thinking for several reasons, material
        strength, warmth, etc.. but you are right they could hang a little
        too.  My only concern with this idea is that in the night if for some
        weird reason the hammock malfunctioned and I fell on her.  I wouldn't
        want to do that of course!  ACK!

        jamie in az

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Garlington"
        <rgarling@y...> wrote:

        > This is a really good idea.  An open-bottom cone could be staked to
        > the ground with a side entry hole for the dog.  He would have a
        nice
        > house separate from your sleeping quarters & he could contribute
        some
        > heat.  Much better than tenting with a wet dog!
        >
        > If the dog was 'hammock trained', you could have a closed-bottom
        cone
        > with a side entry for the dog.  He would then be suspended above
        the
        > ground.



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