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Cold Weather Hammock

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  • wsmurdoch@aol.com
    Here is where I am with a cold weather hammock. 1. I bought Ed s book and read it. Do that, it is worth the price. 2. I bought 3.5 yds of ripstop and 10 yds
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 22, 2003
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      Here is where I am with a cold weather hammock.

      1. I bought Ed's book and read it.  Do that, it is worth the price.

      2. I bought 3.5 yds of ripstop and 10 yds of  1" poly webbing.  I hemmed the selvages of the nylon and one end, then tied it together into a hammock Ed-fashion with half the webbing at each end and began playing.  I tied the knots experimenting with the hammock length till I found what suited me and fit under my tarp, cut hammock to that length, and hemmed the remaining end.  I ended up using doubled sheetbends rather than Ed's knots to secure the webbing, but that is just preference.  I do not know that it is better.  Do this, and you will get a great light weight summer hammock for about $25.

      3. I knew from playing with my Hennessy that a flat fiberfill filled nylon pad tied under the hammock fits poorly and leaves gaps (like wrapping a basketball with a piece of paper) .  The hammock has ridges on its bottom and these give additional paths for cold air to come between me and my pad.  So…  I bought 2.5 yds more ripstop and cut out a coffin lid 2 ft at the head and feet by 3 ft at the shoulder by 6.5 ft long with a 3 inch high side turned up around all the edges.  I put 1/4 inch darts every 6 inches at the top of the sides to make it curl.  I put in two layers (about 2.25 inches) of Primaloft tacking it in place with some 3M 77 spray adhesive.  I then sewed the coffin lid to the bottom of my Ed Hammock with a 0.5 inch seam allowance matching it to a chalk line that was 21 inches at the head and feet, 32 inches across the shoulders. and 70 inches long.  The pad is bigger than the hammock and hangs down just a little when I am in it.  To pull it up, I put 2 inch Ray Jardine knotted quilt loops through it on 12 inch pitch from top to bottom down the middle and with a row on each side on the same pitch but 4 inches in from the sides.  The pad is on the diagonal that I sleep on and looks like the pad on the working side of a boxing glove puckering along the edges where it is attached to the hammock.  Two hours spent in it this weekend leave me thinking that I am going in the right direction.  If I was to do it again, I would make the coffin lid 6 inches wider at the shoulder (and I wear a size 37 jacket), and that would be only to make it easier to hit with my sleeping bag.

      4. Along the way I slid one of those plastic class 15 sewing machine bobbins onto the webbing, rubbing some silicone glue into the bit of webbing where the bobbin stopped and packing a little more glue in unfilled parts of the bobbin hole.  In my sink it stops water from either wicking or running down the webbing sort of like a rat stopper on a ships dock lines.

      5. I am still playing with the amount of cloth pulled out of the bunch at the knotted ends of the hammock.  I have tried different lengths measured along the selvages (1, 2, 3, 4 inches) and different tapers (from the selvages to 4 inches in, 8 inches in, 16 inches in), but I have not yet settled on a "best".

      Bill Murdoch
    • Ed Speer
      Way to go Bill! That 2.25 of insulation below the hammock should do you well--even eliminating the need for interior sleep pads, which I don t like in the
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 22, 2003
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        Way to go Bill!  That 2.25" of insulation below the hammock should do you well--even eliminating the need for interior sleep pads, which I don't like in the first place.  The hand-quilting stitches to draw the insulation up to the hammock are another necessary trick since they eliminate an otherwise cold air space.  Let us know how this works in cold temps; I'm anious to hear your results.  You're on the right path--keep it up!  What is the current weight?
         
        Glad you liked the book!.....Ed
        Here is where I am with a cold weather hammock.

        1. I bought Ed's book and read it.  Do that, it is worth the price.

        2. I bought 3.5 yds of ripstop and 10 yds of  1" poly webbing.  I hemmed the selvages of the nylon and one end, then tied it together into a hammock Ed-fashion with half the webbing at each end and began playing.  I tied the knots experimenting with the hammock length till I found what suited me and fit under my tarp, cut hammock to that length, and hemmed the remaining end.  I ended up using doubled sheetbends rather than Ed's knots to secure the webbing, but that is just preference.  I do not know that it is better.  Do this, and you will get a great light weight summer hammock for about $25.

        3. I knew from playing with my Hennessy that a flat fiberfill filled nylon pad tied under the hammock fits poorly and leaves gaps (like wrapping a basketball with a piece of paper) .  The hammock has ridges on its bottom and these give additional paths for cold air to come between me and my pad.  So…  I bought 2.5 yds more ripstop and cut out a coffin lid 2 ft at the head and feet by 3 ft at the shoulder by 6.5 ft long with a 3 inch high side turned up around all the edges.  I put 1/4 inch darts every 6 inches at the top of the sides to make it curl.  I put in two layers (about 2.25 inches) of Primaloft tacking it in place with some 3M 77 spray adhesive.  I then sewed the coffin lid to the bottom of my Ed Hammock with a 0.5 inch seam allowance matching it to a chalk line that was 21 inches at the head and feet, 32 inches across the shoulders. and 70 inches long.  The pad is bigger than the hammock and hangs down just a little when I am in it.  To pull it up, I put 2 inch Ray Jardine knotted quilt loops through it on 12 inch pitch from top to bottom down the middle and with a row on each side on the same pitch but 4 inches in from the sides.  The pad is on the diagonal that I sleep on and looks like the pad on the working side of a boxing glove puckering along the edges where it is attached to the hammock.  Two hours spent in it this weekend leave me thinking that I am going in the right direction.  If I was to do it again, I would make the coffin lid 6 inches wider at the shoulder (and I wear a size 37 jacket), and that would be only to make it easier to hit with my sleeping bag.

        4. Along the way I slid one of those plastic class 15 sewing machine bobbins onto the webbing, rubbing some silicone glue into the bit of webbing where the bobbin stopped and packing a little more glue in unfilled parts of the bobbin hole.  In my sink it stops water from either wicking or running down the webbing sort of like a rat stopper on a ships dock lines.

        5. I am still playing with the amount of cloth pulled out of the bunch at the knotted ends of the hammock.  I have tried different lengths measured along the selvages (1, 2, 3, 4 inches) and different tapers (from the selvages to 4 inches in, 8 inches in, 16 inches in), but I have not yet settled on a "best".

        Bill Murdoch


      • wsmurdoch@aol.com
        ... The hammock with 2-15 ft straps and the attached fiberfill pad weighs 39.8 oz. Bill Murdoch
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 23, 2003
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          "Ed Speer" <info@...> writes:


          From:
          Subject: RE: Cold Weather Hammock

            What is the current weight?


          The hammock with 2-15 ft straps and the attached fiberfill pad weighs 39.8 oz. 

          Bill Murdoch
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