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Re: Hammock Camping Tied between trees during lightening...

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  • J Cornelius
    Sleep in the hammock anyway - I love storms and if I m gonna die, it might as well be swinging in the trees! Jodi Abnormality is THE normality at this locality
    Message 1 of 21 , Aug 27, 2003
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      Sleep in the hammock anyway - I love storms and if I'm gonna die, it might as well be swinging in the trees!
       
      Jodi
       
       
      Abnormality is THE normality at this locality
      -------Original Message-------
       
      Date: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 4:04:19 PM
      Subject: Hammock Camping Tied between trees during lightening...
       
      What would you do? Get out and squat on a foam pad?



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    • Dave Womble
      ... path of ... ground. The ... Shane, I have seen/heard that same comment before, but I see a few potential problems. The current caused by the lightning
      Message 2 of 21 , Aug 27, 2003
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Shane Steinkamp" <shane@t...>
        wrote:
        > > What would you do? Get out and squat on a foam pad?
        >
        > You're much safer in the hammock. Remember, lightning follows the
        path of
        > least resistance. You are really pretty safe suspended off the
        ground. The
        > lightning will run right down the trees and diffuse into the ground.
        >
        > Shane

        Shane,

        I have seen/heard that same comment before, but I see a few potential
        problems. The current caused by the lightning discharge will try to
        follow all of its available paths to ground, with the magnitude of
        the currents in each path being inversely proportional to the
        resistance in that path. If everything is wet, it might make it even
        worse for an attached hammock. It might be possible for the hammock
        webbing/rope to melt. Then there is the fact that sometimes the tree
        kinda explodes and limbs fall off or the trunk explodes or chunks fly
        off. All in all, lightning is not something you want to get close
        and personal with. It is a danger and being in a hammock is not
        going to keep you completely safe. Thankfully, I don't have any
        experience being in a hammock when lightning hit one of the
        attachment trees, but I have seen lightning damaged trees and don't
        think I would have wanted to be anywhere near them. I think the best
        thing we hammock hangers have going for us is that we are not usually
        attached to the biggest trees and the odds are that lightning will
        strike the highest ones around.

        Youngblood
      • Thomas Peltier
        Now this brings up the question of Widow Makers and hanging under a tree _____ From: Dave Womble [mailto:dpwomble@yahoo.com] Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2003
        Message 3 of 21 , Aug 27, 2003
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          Now this brings up the question of Widow Makers and hanging under a tree

           


          From: Dave Womble [mailto:dpwomble@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 3:19 PM
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

           

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Shane Steinkamp" <shane@t...>
          wrote:
          > > What would you do? Get out and squat on a foam pad?
          >
          > You're much safer in the hammock.  Remember, lightning follows the
          path of
          > least resistance.  You are really pretty safe suspended off the
          ground.  The
          > lightning will run right down the trees and diffuse into the ground.
          >
          > Shane

          Shane,

          I have seen/heard that same comment before, but I see a few potential
          problems.  The current caused by the lightning discharge will try to
          follow all of its available paths to ground, with the magnitude of
          the currents in each path being inversely proportional to the
          resistance in that path.  If everything is wet, it might make it even
          worse for an attached hammock.  It might be possible for the hammock
          webbing/rope to melt.  Then there is the fact that sometimes the tree
          kinda explodes and limbs fall off or the trunk explodes or chunks fly
          off.  All in all, lightning is not something you want to get close
          and personal with.  It is a danger and being in a hammock is not
          going to keep you completely safe.  Thankfully, I don't have any
          experience being in a hammock when lightning hit one of the
          attachment trees, but I have seen lightning damaged trees and don't
          think I would have wanted to be anywhere near them.  I think the best
          thing we hammock hangers have going for us is that we are not usually
          attached to the biggest trees and the odds are that lightning will
          strike the highest ones around.

          Youngblood



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        • ciyd01
          Lightning and all electrical current will take the easiest path to ground. Lightning has a strong preference for the tallest item it encounters. However, a
          Message 4 of 21 , Aug 27, 2003
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            Lightning and all electrical current will take the easiest path to
            ground. Lightning has a strong preference for the tallest item it
            encounters. However, a shorter tree located on the very edge of a
            cliff or hill is a likely lightning strike as it presents an easy
            target for a lot of built up energy. The problem with the hammock is
            that it is stretched between 2 trees and a close strike actually
            induces current flow in nearby conductive items. It is possible that
            the voltage potential between one end of the hammock and the other
            could be high enough to allow current to flow through it (and you).
            That's why they tell you to squat on the ground with your feet close
            together and your hands wrapped around you knees. Current flowing
            from hand to hand goes through the heart and causes fibrillation.
            Current flowing from hand to foot can go through heart or abdominal
            cavity causing fibrillation or vomiting (seen it). Current flowing
            from foot to foot does not flow through any major organ systems.
            Most people die from either fibrillation (muscle spasms of the heart
            that don't allow for blood to be pumped through the heart) or the
            massive burns (internal and external) or bleeding caused from limb
            loss (not tree limbs - arms and legs).

            Can you tell I work around high voltage for a living?

            Don't pick the tallest tree. Don't pick the tree next to the tallest
            tree. Don't pick a tree on the edge of a hill or cliff. Don't golf
            in an electrical storm (yes, people still die doing this).

            ciyd

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "J Cornelius" <bpskids@c...>
            wrote:
            > Sleep in the hammock anyway - I love storms and if I'm gonna die,
            it might
            > as well be swinging in the trees!
            >
            > Jodi
            >
            >
            >
            > Abnormality is THE normality at this locality
            > -------Original Message-------
            >
            > From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 4:04:19 PM
            > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Hammock Camping Tied between trees during lightening...
            >
            > What would you do? Get out and squat on a foam pad?
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
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            >
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            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
          • Thomas Peltier
            Hmm, take a lightning rod, stand in an open space and stick it up over your head. Yeah, that s a damn good idea in a lightning storm. Great info about the
            Message 5 of 21 , Aug 27, 2003
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              Hmm,  take a lightning rod, stand in an open space and stick it up over your head…

               

              Yeah, that’s a damn good idea in a lightning storm.  Great info about the flow and all. 

               

               


              From: ciyd01 [mailto:ciyd@...]
              Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 4:35 PM
              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

               

              Lightning and all electrical current will take the easiest path to
              ground.  Lightning has a strong preference for the tallest item it
              encounters.  However, a shorter tree located on the very edge of a
              cliff or hill is a likely lightning strike as it presents an easy
              target for a lot of built up energy.  The problem with the hammock is
              that it is stretched between 2 trees and a close strike actually
              induces current flow in nearby conductive items.  It is possible that
              the voltage potential between one end of the hammock and the other
              could be high enough to allow current to flow through it (and you). 
              That's why they tell you to squat on the ground with your feet close
              together and your hands wrapped around you knees.  Current flowing
              from hand to hand goes through the heart and causes fibrillation. 
              Current flowing from hand to foot can go through heart or abdominal
              cavity causing fibrillation or vomiting (seen it).  Current flowing
              from foot to foot does not flow through any major organ systems. 
              Most people die from either fibrillation (muscle spasms of the heart
              that don't allow for blood to be pumped through the heart) or the
              massive burns (internal and external) or bleeding caused from limb
              loss (not tree limbs - arms and legs).

              Can you tell I work around high voltage for a living?

              Don't pick the tallest tree.  Don't pick the tree next to the tallest
              tree.  Don't pick a tree on the edge of a hill or cliff.  Don't golf
              in an electrical storm (yes, people still die doing this).

              ciyd

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "J Cornelius" <bpskids@c...>
              wrote:
              > Sleep in the hammock anyway - I love storms and if I'm gonna die,
              it might
              > as well be swinging in the trees!
              >
              > Jodi
              >
              >
              >
              > Abnormality is THE normality at this locality
              > -------Original Message-------
              >
              > From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 4:04:19 PM
              > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Hammock Camping Tied between trees during lightening...
              >
              > What would you do? Get out and squat on a foam pad?
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              > ADVERTISEMENT
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



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            • Dave Womble
              ... Not quite right. Lightning and all electrical current will take EVERY path to ground that is available to it. The current will split and the path with
              Message 6 of 21 , Aug 27, 2003
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                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ciyd01" <ciyd@a...> wrote:
                > Lightning and all electrical current will take the easiest path to
                > ground.

                Not quite right. Lightning and all electrical current will take
                EVERY path to ground that is available to it. The current will split
                and the path with least resistance will get proportionately more
                current. For example, if you have a two bulb light fixture in your
                house and place a 100 watt bulb in fixture #1 and a 50 watt bulb in
                fixture #2, don't they BOTH light up? The 100 watt bulb is the
                easiest path to ground, but current still flows through the higher
                resistance of the 50 watt bulb. BTW, this is how a 50/100/150 watt 3-
                way light bulb works; a 50 watt & a 100 watt bulb with a 4 postion
                switch.

                Youngblood
              • Ronald
                I also understand this to be true. If the least resistance path is a billion times more than lethal current and the path through you is only a thousand times
                Message 7 of 21 , Aug 27, 2003
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                  I also understand this to be true.  If the least resistance path is a billion times more than lethal current and the path through you is only a thousand times more than a lethal current, then there is very little difference as far as you are concerned.
                   
                  From spending a lot of time on mountain peaks with experts like the ski patrol, I have learned a little from them to pass on to you.  They will first seek a lower place and shelter, but if in the process they feel all of their hairs standing on end and believe a near lightning strike is imminent, then they will crouch down low with their feet close together.  The reason is that a ground strike nearby will result in a huge amount of current dissipating through high resistance soil and rock with a tremendous voltage gradient.  The voltage between two points is greater for a greater distance.  With your feet spread apart, you span a greater voltage differential and would get more current than if your feet were together.
                   
                  Taking this into my thought and extrapolating to a hammock strung between two trees, I'm seeing that you can be reaching out across a huge potential were lightning strike nearby.  I'm wondering if a wire going from one end of your hammock to the other end might give you any protection, but I caution you that I have not tested this ;)
                   
                  Maybe someone who knows can tell us more.
                   
                  Ronald H Levine
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 6:09 PM
                  Subject: Re: Hammock Camping Tied between trees during lightening...

                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ciyd01" <ciyd@a...> wrote:
                  > Lightning and all electrical current will take the easiest path to
                  > ground. 

                  Not quite right.  Lightning and all electrical current will take
                  EVERY path to ground that is available to it.  The current will split
                  and the path with least resistance will get proportionately more
                  current.  For example, if you have a two bulb light fixture in your
                  house and place a 100 watt bulb in fixture #1 and a 50 watt bulb in
                  fixture #2, don't they BOTH light up?  The 100 watt bulb is the
                  easiest path to ground, but current still flows through the higher
                  resistance of the 50 watt bulb.  BTW, this is how a 50/100/150 watt 3-
                  way light bulb works; a 50 watt & a 100 watt bulb with a 4 postion
                  switch.

                  Youngblood



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                • Risk
                  And, If I m gonna swing in the trees, I d rather not die... ... might
                  Message 8 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                    And, If I'm gonna swing in the trees, I'd rather not die...

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "J Cornelius" <bpskids@c...> wrote:
                    > Sleep in the hammock anyway - I love storms and if I'm gonna die, it
                    might
                    > as well be swinging in the trees!
                    >
                    > Jodi
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Abnormality is THE normality at this locality
                    > -------Original Message-------
                    >
                    > From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 4:04:19 PM
                    > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Hammock Camping Tied between trees during lightening...
                    >
                    > What would you do? Get out and squat on a foam pad?
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                    > ADVERTISEMENT
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                  • Lenny Nichols
                    I just returned from a trip to Colorado. It was my first backpacking trip with a Hammock (HH). We seem to have caused evening thunderstorms by cooking
                    Message 9 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                      I just returned from a trip to Colorado. It was my first backpacking trip
                      with a Hammock (HH). We seem to have caused evening thunderstorms by
                      cooking dinner... One evening I had just finished cooking dinner when a
                      huge thunderstorm hit. Everyone else crawled into their tents. I sat on my
                      foam "sit-upon" pad under my hammock, ate dinner, and watched the storm. We
                      had three lightning strikes within about 300 yards and torrential rain. I
                      figured I was pretty safe on the foam pad, but I put in earplugs. If the
                      lightning got any closer, and it didn't actually hit me, it might deafen
                      me. I'm glad to report that I stayed safe and also stayed dry.

                      I did learn another lesson that I don't recall seeing explicitly in the HH
                      instruction. Instead of "opening up" the Snakeskins and sitting in the
                      hammock to tension it when setting up, I just leaned on it with everything
                      still inside the Snakeskins. I managed to break the ridge line in the
                      hammock. I was pleased to learn that the hammock still worked fine; I just
                      couldn't store anything overhead. So once I get the hammock back from HH;
                      no more leaning on the ridge line.

                      Lenny Nichols, PMP
                    • Thomas Peltier
                      Or perhaps to a ground rod? _____ From: Ronald [mailto:Ronald.H.Levine@mindspring.com] Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 5:39 PM To:
                      Message 10 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                        Or perhaps to a ground rod?

                         

                         


                        From: Ronald [mailto:Ronald.H.Levine@...]
                        Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 5:39 PM
                        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

                         

                        I also understand this to be true.  If the least resistance path is a billion times more than lethal current and the path through you is only a thousand times more than a lethal current, then there is very little difference as far as you are concerned.

                         

                        From spending a lot of time on mountain peaks with experts like the ski patrol, I have learned a little from them to pass on to you.  They will first seek a lower place and shelter, but if in the process they feel all of their hairs standing on end and believe a near lightning strike is imminent, then they will crouch down low with their feet close together.  The reason is that a ground strike nearby will result in a huge amount of current dissipating through high resistance soil and rock with a tremendous voltage gradient.  The voltage between two points is greater for a greater distance.  With your feet spread apart, you span a greater voltage differential and would get more current than if your feet were together.

                         

                        Taking this into my thought and extrapolating to a hammock strung between two trees, I'm seeing that you can be reaching out across a huge potential were lightning strike nearby.  I'm wondering if a wire going from one end of your hammock to the other end might give you any protection, but I caution you that I have not tested this ;)

                         

                        Maybe someone who knows can tell us more.

                         

                        Ronald H Levine

                         

                        ----- Original Message -----

                        Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 6:09 PM

                        Subject: Re: Hammock Camping Tied between trees during lightening...

                         

                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ciyd01" <ciyd@a...> wrote:
                        > Lightning and all electrical current will take the easiest path to
                        > ground. 

                        Not quite right.  Lightning and all electrical current will take
                        EVERY path to ground that is available to it.  The current will split
                        and the path with least resistance will get proportionately more
                        current.  For example, if you have a two bulb light fixture in your
                        house and place a 100 watt bulb in fixture #1 and a 50 watt bulb in
                        fixture #2, don't they BOTH light up?  The 100 watt bulb is the
                        easiest path to ground, but current still flows through the higher
                        resistance of the 50 watt bulb.  BTW, this is how a 50/100/150 watt 3-
                        way light bulb works; a 50 watt & a 100 watt bulb with a 4 postion
                        switch.

                        Youngblood



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                        hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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                      • Ronald
                        I know that the tendency is for lightning to travel on the outside surfaces of an object. Perhaps the wet skin of a tent or hammock would be conductive enough
                        Message 11 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                          I know that the tendency is for lightning to travel on the outside surfaces
                          of an object. Perhaps the wet skin of a tent or hammock would be conductive
                          enough combined with repulsion of the charge of electrons and the tendency
                          to travel on the outside surfaces might result in some protection. I'm
                          thinking that the wire on the outside surface and away from the body would
                          encourage a path that might detour it around your body not unlike being
                          inside an automobile or an airplane. Perhaps a large loop with you in the
                          middle will have some protection. It wouldn't be practical to lug around a
                          heavy conductor, so just a thin wire might initiate the path of current
                          which would be so great that the wire will instantly explode into an ionized
                          gas, but that should still be a path. Again, that is my speculation based
                          on just bits and pieces of related information and it is untested. It would
                          be good to know, so I post it in case someone can direct us to proven
                          information.

                          Ronald

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: Thomas Peltier
                          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2003 10:53 AM
                          Subject: RE: Hammock Camping Tied between trees during lightening...

                          Or perhaps to a ground rod?

                          From: Ronald [mailto:Ronald.H.Levine@...]
                          Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 5:39 PM
                          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

                          I also understand this to be true. If the least resistance path is a
                          billion times more than lethal current and the path through you is only a
                          thousand times more than a lethal current, then there is very little
                          difference as far as you are concerned.

                          >From spending a lot of time on mountain peaks with experts like the ski
                          patrol, I have learned a little from them to pass on to you. They will
                          first seek a lower place and shelter, but if in the process they feel all of
                          their hairs standing on end and believe a near lightning strike is imminent,
                          then they will crouch down low with their feet close together. The reason
                          is that a ground strike nearby will result in a huge amount of current
                          dissipating through high resistance soil and rock with a tremendous voltage
                          gradient. The voltage between two points is greater for a greater distance.
                          With your feet spread apart, you span a greater voltage differential and
                          would get more current than if your feet were together.

                          Taking this into my thought and extrapolating to a hammock strung between
                          two trees, I'm seeing that you can be reaching out across a huge potential
                          were lightning strike nearby. I'm wondering if a wire going from one end of
                          your hammock to the other end might give you any protection, but I caution
                          you that I have not tested this ;)

                          Maybe someone who knows can tell us more.

                          Ronald H Levine

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: Dave Womble
                          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2003 6:09 PM
                          Subject: Re: Hammock Camping Tied between trees during lightening...

                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ciyd01" <ciyd@a...> wrote:
                          > Lightning and all electrical current will take the easiest path to
                          > ground.

                          Not quite right. Lightning and all electrical current will take
                          EVERY path to ground that is available to it. The current will split
                          and the path with least resistance will get proportionately more
                          current. For example, if you have a two bulb light fixture in your
                          house and place a 100 watt bulb in fixture #1 and a 50 watt bulb in
                          fixture #2, don't they BOTH light up? The 100 watt bulb is the
                          easiest path to ground, but current still flows through the higher
                          resistance of the 50 watt bulb. BTW, this is how a 50/100/150 watt 3-
                          way light bulb works; a 50 watt & a 100 watt bulb with a 4 postion
                          switch.

                          Youngblood

                          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                          hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        • ciyd01
                          A thin wire at those energy levels is known as a fast blow fuse. No protection. 50% of all lightning stroke currents is above 30,000 Amps. A 0000 wire,
                          Message 12 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                            A thin wire at those energy levels is known as a fast blow fuse. No
                            protection. 50% of all lightning stroke currents is above 30,000
                            Amps. A 0000 wire, which has an outer diameter of .460" has a
                            current rating of 316 Amps. The typical 16AWG wire is rated at
                            11.5Amps. You'll need to bring about 1500 of them with you, and
                            drive them 6 feet into the ground, to dissipate that much energy. A
                            thin wire attached to your hammock is now a lightning rod and is only
                            going to provide a point for corona build up.

                            Yes, current will take multiple parallel paths to ground but we are
                            talking about some enormous ENORMOUS amounts of energy here and just
                            about everything nearby IS a path of low resistance. Energy in the
                            level of kilo joules. The lightning stroke reaches temperatures of
                            several tens of thousand degrees Kelvin (or Fahrenheit), clearly
                            sufficient to initiate combustion in many common materials. In many
                            common materials lightning current causes a rapid localized expansion
                            that causes the material to fracture or split apart. This effect can
                            be observed in trees that have been split by lightning or in masonry
                            buildings that have bricks "blown" off. When lightning strikes a
                            building, it can cause internal electric fields in excess of 100
                            thousand volts per meter and can cause internal arcing across rooms.

                            Now, taking 100kV per meter, the average man is approximately 2
                            meters long, that's 200kV. The resistance of the human body, (dry
                            unbroken skin) is 250k ohms. V = I*R. I = V/R. I = 200kV/250K
                            ohms so I = 1A. While I don't have the numbers for currents at
                            these frequencies, in 60Hz applications, .010 Amps is holding current
                            (can't let go) and .060Amps is considered to be probably fatal. 1A
                            is surely fatal.

                            If the current running through your body doesn't kill you, surely
                            the "localised expansion" of the tissues will. Most linemen don't
                            die from electrocution, they die from burns, blood loss, or the fall.

                            PLEASE PLEASE don't fuck around with wire grounding and crap like
                            that! This is energy on the order of a generating station being
                            discharged in a matter of milliseconds. This is a highly specialized
                            field of electrical engineering that I have only had occasion to
                            briefly interact with. If you're really interested in lightning,
                            find a copy of ANSI/IEEE 62.42 for a crash course in lightning
                            protection. There's a lot of good info on how they get their data
                            and what the average lightning event looks like. Another good site
                            for lightning information is:

                            http://www.boltlightningprotection.com/lightning_physics.htm


                            Better safe and crouched down than dead!
                            ciyd

                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ronald"
                            <Ronald.H.Levine@m...> wrote:
                            > I know that the tendency is for lightning to travel on the outside
                            surfaces
                            > of an object. Perhaps the wet skin of a tent or hammock would be
                            conductive
                            > enough combined with repulsion of the charge of electrons and the
                            tendency
                            > to travel on the outside surfaces might result in some protection.
                            I'm
                            > thinking that the wire on the outside surface and away from the
                            body would
                            > encourage a path that might detour it around your body not unlike
                            being
                            > inside an automobile or an airplane. Perhaps a large loop with you
                            in the
                            > middle will have some protection. It wouldn't be practical to lug
                            around a
                            > heavy conductor, so just a thin wire might initiate the path of
                            current
                            > which would be so great that the wire will instantly explode into
                            an ionized
                            > gas, but that should still be a path. Again, that is my
                            speculation based
                            > on just bits and pieces of related information and it is untested.
                            It would
                            > be good to know, so I post it in case someone can direct us to
                            proven
                            > information.
                            >
                            > Ronald
                          • Thomas Peltier
                            PLEASE PLEASE don t fuck around with wire grounding and crap like that! This is energy on the order of a generating station being discharged in a matter of
                            Message 13 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                              PLEASE PLEASE don't fuck around with wire grounding and crap like
                              that!  This is energy on the order of a generating station being
                              discharged in a matter of milliseconds.

                               

                               

                              Ah, your taking all the fun out of it.  And just when I was thinking about Storm hunting to test my new 24 guage hammock grounding device  I call it the HGD.

                               

                            • Bror8588@AOL.com
                              In a message dated 8/28/03 18:28:50 Eastern Daylight Time, ... Now, if instead of a grounding device one used a kite with a key on the tail and attached it to
                              Message 14 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                                In a message dated 8/28/03 18:28:50 Eastern Daylight Time, Thomas@... writes:



                                PLEASE PLEASE don't fuck around with wire grounding and crap like
                                that!  This is energy on the order of a generating station being
                                discharged in a matter of milliseconds.


                                Ah, your taking all the fun out of it.  And just when I was thinking about Storm hunting to test my new 24 gauge hammock grounding device  I call it the HGD




                                Now, if instead of a grounding device one used a kite with a key on the tail and attached it to a volt meter, ohm meter, ampere meter and the flush toilet what kind of readings could we expect.  Would there be enough power to flush the toilet?
                                Just curious.  BTW are there privies where there are flush toilets on any of the trails?

                                Skylander Jack  
                              • ciyd01
                                Is that being sold under the DarwinWasRight brand name? ;-) ... thinking about ... call it
                                Message 15 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                                  Is that being sold under the DarwinWasRight brand name? ;-)



                                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Peltier" <Thomas@G...>
                                  wrote:
                                  > Ah, your taking all the fun out of it. And just when I was
                                  thinking about
                                  > Storm hunting to test my new 24 guage hammock grounding device I
                                  call it
                                  > the HGD.
                                • Thomas Peltier
                                  The new DWR HGD available at the HSN real soon _____ From: ciyd01 [mailto:ciyd@attbi.com] Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2003 3:49 PM To:
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                                    The new DWR HGD available at the HSN real soon

                                     

                                     


                                    From: ciyd01 [mailto:ciyd@...]
                                    Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2003 3:49 PM
                                    To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

                                     

                                    Is that being sold under the DarwinWasRight brand name?  ;-)



                                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Peltier" <Thomas@G...>
                                    wrote:
                                    > Ah, your taking all the fun out of it.  And just when I was
                                    thinking about
                                    > Storm hunting to test my new 24 guage hammock grounding device  I
                                    call it
                                    > the HGD.



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                                  • Coy
                                    Set up on a flex pay I hope. Seriously, If I m set up in my hammock at night NOT in the tallest trees around and a bad electrical storm rolls in, I m gona
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                                      Set up on a flex pay I hope. Seriously, If I'm set up in my
                                      hammock at night NOT in the tallest trees around and a bad
                                      electrical storm rolls in, I'm gona just hunker down. Anything with
                                      metal will be thrown to the wind, whether it is a pack with aluminum
                                      stays or my radio. I've been through a few storms and it was nerve
                                      racking but I figgure my hammock is about as safe as the next
                                      option. Now if I know of a cave close by I would think of making a
                                      run for it. I have been run in a few caves by lightning storms when
                                      out day hiking.

                                      Coy Boy

                                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Peltier"
                                      <Thomas@G...> wrote:
                                      > The new DWR HGD available at the HSN real soon
                                    • ciyd01
                                      ... with ... aluminum ... I would, too. The point is to not be the easiest thing for lightning to reach. Tallest trees or the first set of trees on a cliff
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Aug 28, 2003
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                                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
                                        > Seriously, If I'm set up in my
                                        > hammock at night NOT in the tallest trees around and a bad
                                        > electrical storm rolls in, I'm gona just hunker down. Anything
                                        with
                                        > metal will be thrown to the wind, whether it is a pack with
                                        aluminum
                                        > stays or my radio.

                                        I would, too. The point is to not be the easiest thing for lightning
                                        to reach. Tallest trees or the first set of trees on a cliff or hill
                                        are bad. If I'm concerned that the storm is really bad, I might
                                        hunker down under the hammock until the worst of it passed. That's
                                        usually 30 minutes or less.

                                        I think falling branches would be the biggest danger.

                                        Fortunately, I moved out of the stormy part of the continent. We
                                        just don't get that much electrical storm activity here and it's
                                        usually pretty tame compared to Texas and Florida.

                                        ciyd
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