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Hammock Camping Re: Newbie question about rain

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  • Ray Garlington
    ... Yes. The model I have is the Explorer 2.5 I have used it in rain several times, the worst of which was a thunderstorm with ~30mph winds. The wind-driven
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 7, 2003
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "firefly" <firefly@e...> wrote:
      > Ray, I assume you're talking about HH?

      Yes. The model I have is the Explorer 2.5 I have used it in rain
      several times, the worst of which was a thunderstorm with ~30mph
      winds. The wind-driven rain hit the hammcock body in the vicinity of
      my shoulders seeping through a little. Sgt Rock has reported using
      the HH during the passage of a hurricane, through which he stayed dry.

      > and I was wondering if those cords that came with the tarp are
      strong
      > enough to sustain the kinds of winds you can get in places like the
      Sierras.
      > Or should I invest in some Triptease instead? MARSANNE

      I think the cords on the fly are strong enough, particularly if you
      are protected by trees. If you expect heavy weather, just pitch the
      tarp very tight and low.
    • dchinell
      Marsanne: I m sure you ve heard me say this before, but I ll repeat it just in case. When I expect bad weather, I replace the stock HH fly with a custom made 8
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 7, 2003
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        Marsanne:

        I'm sure you've heard me say this before, but I'll repeat it just in
        case. When I expect bad weather, I replace the stock HH fly with a
        custom made 8 x 8 foot silnylon tarp. I pitch this on the diagonal,
        so it's very much like the HH tarp, but gives a little more coverage
        at the ends, and more overall square footage.

        As a side note, I understand that part of the reason for the
        skimpiness of the stock HH fly is that Tom dislikes seams, and won't
        make the fly bigger if it means adding a seam.

        Like the others who replied, I've only gotten wet under the stock
        fly when I'm exposed to the wind. I get wet at the shoulders or
        where my feet are poking the side as I lie diagonally. It never
        bothered me enough to make me get out and lower the tarp, I just
        found a snugger position that kept the hammock from sticking into
        the rain.

        Bear
      • Shane
        ... If the hammock is pitched properly, you can stay dry even in a blowing rain. It does help to try to pitch in a spot sheltered from the wind. You should
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 7, 2003
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          > If it were just a light rain with no wind, so the rain was
          > falling straight down, I can see how the fly would protect the
          > hammock, but what happens in rain being blown by gusts every
          > which way in a storm? I've read accounts from folks that say
          > the hammocks stay dry in a heavy rain, I need someone to explain
          > the mechanics exactly of *how* you can stay dry in a windy storm,
          > particularly the ends.

          If the hammock is pitched properly, you can stay dry even in a blowing rain.
          It does help to try to pitch in a spot sheltered from the wind. You should
          pull the tarp tight and close to the sides.

          I think I cover this in my review, here:

          http://tinyurl.com/au8q

          Shane
        • Shane
          ... A 10x10. It provides many pitching opportunities. Shane
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 7, 2003
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            > Those of you who have replaced your HH tarps, what did you use
            > for a replacement? Marsanne

            A 10x10. It provides many pitching opportunities.

            Shane
          • Mark Bayern
            ... Is it? So far the tarp on my HH protects the hammock quite well. What I would like is more space for living outside the hammock, under the tarp. Maybe its
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 7, 2003
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              firefly wrote:
              > I think the HH tarp is a design error. It looks cool, but is just too
              > skimpy in the rain.

              Is it? So far the tarp on my HH protects the hammock quite well.

              What I would like is more space for living outside the hammock, under
              the tarp.

              Maybe its a definition thing, but I don't see the HH tarp as a design
              error. Of course a hammock system that is billed as the "Ultra-Lite
              Backpacker" would have a minimal tarp. That helps to make it ultra-lite.

              Mark
            • colonelcorn76
              ... Ultralight. ... loved it. ... Mom was ... was what ... not a ... winds--no ... are strong ... the Sierras. ... I have the HH Ultralight Backpacker & my son
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 8, 2003
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                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "firefly" <firefly@e...>
                wrote:
                > Ray, I assume you're talking about HH? I have the Explorer A-Sym
                Ultralight.
                > I have been in a calm, early morning rain storm with it before and
                loved it.
                > Slept like a baby. (This was in the yard of my parents house and
                Mom was
                > looking nervously out the window worrying I was getting wet.) This
                was what
                > my folks like to call "a farmer's rain"--steady, not a storm, but
                not a
                > sprinkle, either. However, I was camping in DW in some very high
                winds--no
                > rain, and I was wondering if those cords that came with the tarp
                are strong
                > enough to sustain the kinds of winds you can get in places like
                the Sierras.
                > Or should I invest in some Triptease instead? MARSANNE

                I have the HH Ultralight Backpacker & my son has the Explorer. I
                replaced the lines on the fly with a combination of the Goller
                Grabber and Triptease. The Triptease really helps at night 'cause
                those lines go invisible in a hury.

                Jerry's Goller gave me a tip on using the elastic tubing from a
                Wrist Rocket slingshot to create a self-tensioning fly. I attached
                the surgical rubber tubing from a Wrist Rocket's replacement tubing
                to the two rings on the fly. Then I slid a 1/4" nylon spacer to
                which I've attached the Triptease into the end of the tubing. When I
                hang the hammock I stake it out with the rubber tubing nearly fully
                extended. Then as the nylon stretches, the rubber contracts and
                keeps the thing taut throughout the night & any rain. Not gotten wet
                since I made the mod.

                Jim
              • o123david
                ... I ve stayed dry in strong wind and rain. The underside of the hammock works the same way the old canvas tents used to work. All you have to do is keep the
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 17, 2003
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                  >I'm considering a Hennessey Explorer Deluxe A-Sym... but one thing I
                  >can't understand is how the... underside of the hammock wouldn't get
                  >soaked in the rain?
                  >what happens in rain being blown by gusts every which way in a
                  >storm? Sesa

                  I've stayed dry in strong wind and rain.
                  The underside of the hammock works the same way the old canvas tents
                  used to work. All you have to do is keep the material tight and avoid
                  pressing hard against any one point.
                  Your weight keeps the material tight. The pad you are sleeping on
                  lets you avoid putting too much pressure on any one point on the
                  bottom. And you have to avoid pressing hard on any one area along the
                  sides.
                  Even the tiny diamond-shaped tarp on the original hennessy was large
                  enough to block the rain from above. I woke the next morning with my
                  down bag totally dry. --David
                • dshuby
                  -- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, colonelcorn76 ... Jim - I think I got what you are saying. I remember when Jerry talked about this quite some time ago
                  Message 8 of 15 , Aug 19, 2003
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                    -- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "colonelcorn76"
                    > Jerry's Goller gave me a tip on using the elastic tubing from a
                    > Wrist Rocket slingshot to create a self-tensioning fly. I attached
                    > the surgical rubber tubing from a Wrist Rocket's replacement tubing
                    > to the two rings on the fly. Then I slid a 1/4" nylon spacer to
                    > which I've attached the Triptease into the end of the tubing. When I
                    > hang the hammock I stake it out with the rubber tubing nearly fully
                    > extended. Then as the nylon stretches, the rubber contracts and
                    > keeps the thing taut throughout the night & any rain. Not gotten wet
                    > since I made the mod.

                    Jim - I think I got what you are saying. I remember when Jerry talked
                    about this quite some time ago (BPL or BGT?!?), but I didn't have a
                    hammock then so I wasn't paying attention. ;) If I have it right, you
                    are taking rubber tubing and tying it off to each of the rings on the
                    sides of the HH fly. I am missing what you mean by the use of the
                    nylon spacer. I can then understand how the fly line (either the stock
                    2mm line or Triptease which is what I will replace the stock line with
                    when my test series is done) would just be tied off to the rubber
                    tubing and then staked as normal. This would allow the rubber tubing
                    to contract and keep the fly tensioned over time.

                    You could also do something similar by using one line for the hammock
                    body guy and the fly guy. I have been using the elastic line and tying
                    it off to the fly, then staking it out in the middle and allowing it
                    to self-tension. This could work as well if the two lines were
                    connected in some way by rubber tubing and the strain on the lines was
                    roughly equal. Jerry's method allows a bit more adjustment on the fly
                    than what I have been using even though I have used this setup with a
                    trekking pole to adjust the height.

                    Gracias -
                    Dennis
                  • colonelcorn76
                    ... talked ... you ... the ... stock ... with ... tubing ... I included some more detailed directions in a reply to Marsanne s question. The spacer replaces
                    Message 9 of 15 , Aug 20, 2003
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                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dshuby" <shubitow@c...>
                      wrote:
                      > Jim - I think I got what you are saying. I remember when Jerry
                      talked
                      > about this quite some time ago (BPL or BGT?!?), but I didn't have a
                      > hammock then so I wasn't paying attention. ;) If I have it right,
                      you
                      > are taking rubber tubing and tying it off to each of the rings on
                      the
                      > sides of the HH fly. I am missing what you mean by the use of the
                      > nylon spacer. I can then understand how the fly line (either the
                      stock
                      > 2mm line or Triptease which is what I will replace the stock line
                      with
                      > when my test series is done) would just be tied off to the rubber
                      > tubing and then staked as normal. This would allow the rubber
                      tubing
                      > to contract and keep the fly tensioned over time.

                      I included some more detailed directions in a reply to Marsanne's
                      question. The spacer replaces the need to "tie" the cord to the
                      rubber tubing. The knot might work loose or untie, whereas using a
                      spacer slipped into the tubing won't budge. I use cord on my
                      Ultralight Backpacker but TripTease on my son's Explorer.

                      >
                      > You could also do something similar by using one line for the
                      hammock
                      > body guy and the fly guy. I have been using the elastic line and
                      tying
                      > it off to the fly, then staking it out in the middle and allowing
                      it
                      > to self-tension.

                      Yeah, I did this originally but it limits somewhat the staking/tie-
                      out options you have. I also can't use my "pull the fly out in my
                      sleep" trick (I just posted that in another reply above).

                      >Jerry's method allows a bit more adjustment on the fly
                      > than what I have been using even though I have used this setup
                      with a
                      > trekking pole to adjust the height.

                      Precisely why I use it. Elegant solution that keeps maximum options
                      open at minimal extra weight.

                      Jim
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