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Alternative anchor set up

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  • Jim & Marlis Greenway
    I think the figure 8 to make a loop would be called a figure 8 on a bight or a figure 8 on a retrace depending on whether you tied a figure 8 in a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 24, 2003
      I think the "figure 8 to make a loop" would be called a "figure 8 on a
      bight" or a "figure 8 on a retrace" depending on whether you tied a figure 8
      in a folded-over piece of webbing or if you tied a figure 8 in the webbing
      and then made the loop by retracing the running end of the webbing back
      through the original figure 8. You can see an animated version of the fig-8
      at http://www.mistral.co.uk/42brghtn/knots/42ktfig8.html An illustration of
      the fig 8 on a bight is on page 3 of the pdf document
      http://www.western.edu/wscmrt/docs/pdf/rope_trng.pdf

      An anchor that's working well for me is a "tensionless tieoff" or
      "tensionless hitch." I tried to write an explanation of it but realized that
      a reference to the illustration and directions on page 4 at
      http://www.western.edu/wscmrt/docs/pdf/rope_trng.pdf would be easier on
      everyone. I use a small loop and a Black Diamond wire-gate "accessory
      carabiner" to finish the hitch. The lightweight aluminum accessory biner
      safely does the trick since the biner is not a load-bearing part of the
      system. It just keeps the end of the webbing from falling. It's very fast
      (<1minute) in both setup and knock-down and preserves the most webbing
      strength. This hitch is used a lot in rope rescue anchor systems. You could
      always dump the biner and use a bowline, etc. but then you're back to tieing
      knots again.

      Jim in NW Ga.
    • ciyd01
      ... on a ... Figure 8 on a bight and follow through figure 8 are structurally the exact same knot. The former is used if you are going to clip into the
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 24, 2003
        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jim & Marlis Greenway"
        <greenway@b...> wrote:
        > I think the "figure 8 to make a loop" would be called a "figure 8
        on a
        > bight" or a "figure 8 on a retrace"

        "Figure 8 on a bight" and "follow through figure 8" are structurally
        the exact same knot. The former is used if you are going to clip
        into the loop because it is faster to tie. The latter is used when
        you are going to tie into your harness (or something that can't clip
        in to the loop): after you've tied the first figure 8, you run the
        free end through the harness and finish off the follow through. No
        carabiner, which could accidentally open or break, is required.

        > An anchor that's working well for me is a "tensionless tieoff" or
        > "tensionless hitch." I tried to write an explanation of it but
        realized that
        > a reference to the illustration and directions on page 4 at
        > http://www.western.edu/wscmrt/docs/pdf/rope_trng.pdf would be
        easier on
        > everyone.

        This is really handy and should be pretty easy to do just by looking
        at the illustrations. If I find a tree small enough I will try this
        out with my 10' webbing. Thanks for the link. Do you use 4 loops
        around the tree or do you use more?

        ciyd
      • Ed Speer
        Jim, thanks for the info and links....Ed ... From: Jim & Marlis Greenway [mailto:greenway@bellsouth.net] Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2003 6:15 PM To:
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 25, 2003
          Message
          Jim, thanks for the info and links....Ed
           
          -----Original Message-----
          From: Jim & Marlis Greenway [mailto:greenway@...]
          Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2003 6:15 PM
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Hammock Camping Alternative anchor set up

          I think the "figure 8 to make a loop" would be called a "figure 8 on a
          bight" or a "figure 8 on a retrace" depending on whether you tied a figure 8
          in a folded-over piece of webbing or if you tied a figure 8 in the webbing
          and then made the loop by retracing the running end of the webbing back
          through the original figure 8. You can see an animated version of the fig-8
          at http://www.mistral.co.uk/42brghtn/knots/42ktfig8.html An illustration of
          the fig 8 on a bight is on page 3 of the pdf document
          http://www.western.edu/wscmrt/docs/pdf/rope_trng.pdf

          An anchor that's working well for me is a "tensionless tieoff" or
          "tensionless hitch." I tried to write an explanation of it but realized that
          a reference to the illustration and directions on page 4 at
          http://www.western.edu/wscmrt/docs/pdf/rope_trng.pdf would be easier on
          everyone. I use a small loop and a Black Diamond wire-gate "accessory
          carabiner" to finish the hitch. The lightweight aluminum accessory biner
          safely does the trick since the biner is not a load-bearing part of the
          system. It just keeps the end of the webbing from falling. It's very fast
          (<1minute) in both setup and knock-down and preserves the most webbing
          strength. This hitch is used a lot in rope rescue anchor systems. You could
          always dump the biner and use a bowline, etc. but then you're back to tieing
          knots again.

          Jim in NW Ga.





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