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Re: [Hammock Camping] Tyvek hammock?

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  • Cara Lin Bridgman
    ... Washing tyvek does improve flexibility and greatly reduces the noise. I quite like the texture of washed tyvek. It s very much like paper. Now, why do we
    Message 1 of 17 , Aug 20, 2010
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      Ralph Oborn wrote:
      > In general tyvek is a little noisy and since it is water proof
      > can form condensation puddles under you.
      >
      > It can be "washed" and made more flexible (and quiet).


      Washing tyvek does improve flexibility and greatly reduces the noise. I
      quite like the texture of washed tyvek. It's very much like paper.

      Now, why do we get condensation from a waterproof hammock (tyvek,
      silnylon) and not from a waterproof sleeping pad (thermarest's regular
      and NeoAir, ensolite pads, etc)?

      Actually, this last hiking trip (just back two days ago) was so humid
      day and night, that I've got heat rash all across my lower back.
      Sleeping on a breathable surface would have probably prevented the heat
      rash. I was sleeping on a NeoAir.

      One cold, humid, foggy night a few years ago, when car-camping at about
      2500 m in elevation, I experimented with wrapping a 'truck windshield'
      (i.e. about 2 mm of thin 'packing foam' lined with mylar--we can buy
      these sized for 2-person and 4-person tents) around my hammock as an
      outside, windproof layer. I did notice a puddle on the lowest point of
      this layer.

      A year or so later, I used tyvek to make a 'weathershield' kind of like
      Hennessey's--mainly to prevent my underquilt from being dampened by
      splashback. I didn't notice any condensation on the inside layer (more
      near 0*C nights with heavy fog), but I did notice the whole set-up was
      much warmer without the 'weathershield'.

      So, I am noticing some condensation. What about those people who are
      inserting a layer of mylar (emergency blankets) between them and their
      underquilts or Hennessey supershelters? What about condensation in a
      silnylon supershelter?

      CL
    • punky
      Tyvek is water resistant, not waterproof, and vapor permeable. This is why it is used to make painter s coveralls - unlike plastic it lets you wear it without
      Message 2 of 17 , Aug 20, 2010
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        Tyvek is water resistant, not waterproof, and vapor permeable. This is why it is used to make painter's coveralls - unlike plastic it lets you wear it without soaking in your own sweat.

        It gets less noisy with washing.

        It doesn't make a good hammock because it will not support the weight. People at hammock forum have tried. Tore right through. Once it starts, it just tears.

        I have a tarptent made of Tyvek (the Sublite) for a specific kind of outing - it has been a champ in terms of condensation, and unlike nylon it reflects rather than absorbs the heat of the sun, so it makes a very good desert tent. Camping in Big Sur all the nylon tents were drenched on the inside in the morning and I was dry as a bone. The only time the fabric got wet was in a freeze - the water didn't freeze but it gathered in the fabric so it was wet inside and out, and then it did not dry very easily.

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@...> wrote:
        >
        > In general tyvek is a little noisy and since it is water proof can form
        > condensation puddles under you.
        >
        > It can be "washed" and made more flexible (and quiet).
        >
        > On another note I just made a hammock from the black " landscape fabric"
        > that you use to block weeds etc.
        >
        > It does pass water readily, and seems to be durable.
        >
        >
        > Ralph
      • sawyer7271
        There was a thread on this subject on hammockforums.net where an individual did some testing. The person created a couple of gathered end hammocks. One the
        Message 3 of 17 , Aug 20, 2010
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          There was a thread on this subject on hammockforums.net where an individual did some testing. The person created a couple of gathered end hammocks. One the whippings slid off the end. Once that was fixed, the hammock failed as the tyvek ripped at the larkshead.

          Stick to Polyester or ripstop nylon, and use your tyvek for a cheap tarp... If you get lucky, some walmarts have fabric departments (but not for much longer). Look for Sharkskin silver ripstop. 7 yards doubled makes a fantastic hammock. My kids use a single layer of this material, and it works great.

          If you do wash your tyvek, don't use any soap. It does get quieter, but it's still quite noisy in the rain.

          John

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman <shokulan@...> wrote:
          >
          > Anyone make a hammock from tyvek? If so, how did it hold up?
          >
          > CL
          >
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