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Subject: Re: TahoeAreaLetHammocks?

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  • ptoddf@aol.com
    Marsanne, I don t know about Tahoe area yet, but welcome your return report on hammocks there. I d like to do the new Rim Trail. I hope you re using a low
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 8, 2003
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      Marsanne,

      I don't know about Tahoe area yet, but welcome your return report on hammocks there. I'd like to do the new Rim Trail.

      I hope you're using a low stretch woven strap around the trunks. It's the stretchy round rope like nylon that does the damage. Got some 8 foot black woven straps designed to strap luggage on roof racks at Orchard Supply Hardware in L.A. that work great for this, maybe $8 for 2. Cut off the metal buckle.

      My suggestion is to get ahead of the problem. If questioned, or even before, if a ranger is present for any reason, explain that since the strap is flat and spreads out the pressure and doesn't stretch and contract, which would rip off bark when you get in and out, you're doing much, much less damage than ground sleepers. Reasonable rangers, which means some of the typical campground ones, and all of the residential backcountry folks, will be responsive to this understanding -- it is valid.

      They see so much irresponsibility that if you are sincere and have a solid, explainable method, you should be fine. Anyway, we have to try, since eventually hammocks are going to be more common and so more controversial. Play up the LNT ethic too. For example, where there are no pit toilets, I pack out my toilet paper, not a problem at all. I'd mention this to a ranger just to impress him/her with my attitude. And I carefully don't break lower branches, even small dead ones, off the tree to be able to hang the hammock.

      Don't mention the pepper spray though. Technically banned in parks I know  because of, yes, fights between campers where it got used.

      Best, Todd in Tarzana.
    • firefly
      Hi All, I just returned from my trip to the Tahoe-area for a business conference, and then hiking. My flight from Reno landed last night. I went into
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 20, 2003
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        Hi All,
        I just returned from my trip to the Tahoe-area for a business conference, and then hiking. My flight from Reno landed last night.
         
        I went into Desolation Wilderness at Echo Lake, near Lake Tahoe, last Sunday. Every hiker in CA knows about Desolation. This section is very heavily used by day-hikers and family campers. If I had known that, I would have carried much less gear and gone further in. I just wanted to relax, though, so purposely carried a heavy pack with lots of junk in it which I would never usually use. (Binoculars, GPS, 2 beers, coffee, fresh fruit, extra clothes, even a bear cannister, etc.).  
           
        One of the coolest things about this area is the seasonal water taxi that takes you on a stunning 5 mile ride through upper and lower Echo Lakes. I caught the last one in Sunday evening (7pm) and about flipped when I saw the scenery. I will eventually upload pictures, but they don't do it justice, of course. I made it in to the first lake (Tamarack) which was only a mile or so in, just inside the wilderness boundary. I had already had dinner, so I hung my hammock beside the lake and then...THE MOSQUITOES HIT. I was so glad I had already had dinner. I taunted them from inside the hammock. I had trouble sleeping that night because of the cold. No idea what the temps were, but there were melting snow patches nearby. I was using the Z-rest. The next day I left my gear there, took the water taxi back to my rental car, and went into S.Lake Tahoe and Tahoe City to make some gear modifications. I also called my travel agent and had him delay my flight another day so I could spend one more day in paradise.  
         
        I made it to an auto parts store and got a small windshield screen with Mylar on one side. (The one I had torn up and thrown away 2 days before due to its bulk was big enough for my Jeep).  That night, I slept on top of it and the Z-rest, which I had cut into pieces like someone here had suggested. This configuration kept me warm, but the pieces kept sliding around. I fixed this the next day by sewing them together with my tiny SA knife and parachute cord. I took pictures and will upload somewhere later. This worked VERY well. I also rigged a line up to the ridge line in my Hennessy to prevent the setup from sliding down as I am getting in the hammock.
         
        After 2 nights at Tamarak Lake, I moved over to Aloha Lake. I had trouble finding a place to pitch my hammock because most of the trees are too big for the straps. I ended up pitching it right next to the trail. No one seemed to mind. People ignored me if I was in the hammock, and either just smiled and said a quick hello as they passed or said nice things about the hammock if I was outside it.  Several thru-hikers stopped to marvel at it and I think at least one eventually ordered one. The Forest Service ranger who stopped to check my permit made nice comments about the hammock's environmentally-friendly aspects and said she might get one for herself. I slept so well in my Hennessy that when I got back to civilization Thursday night I missed it. I stayed with some friends in Truckee and was packing up my camping gear to ship home because, of course, I went shopping in Reno and could not possibly get all this stuff on the plane.  I slept on a futon for 2 nights, missing my hammock.
         
        I continued to have trouble with mosquitoes due to the melting snow. My friend Bill says it will all be melted and gone in 2 weeks or so, if any of you are thinking about going into this area.
         
        I didn't really need the bear cannister, but it did come in handy under the circumstances because of the aggressive chipmonks and the fact that I did a couple of long day hikes. My cannister weighs 2.7 pounds. I used it as a stool when there was no convenient rock. I won't take it again unless necessary, but I have always had trouble hanging food and am thinking something lighter, like a widemouth plexiglass jar, to protect from chipmonks, would not be a bad idea.
         
        I also switched from one hiking pole to 2, after I met a fine, very young, in-shape thru-hiker who was using 2. I bought a pair in S. Lake Tahoe and used them with their rubber tips, like cross country skis. I truly believed they saved my knees, especially considering my heavy pack.
         
        For the first time ever, I DID NOT GET BLISTERS! I used Lowa Renegades, with some $40 insoles I bought at Just For Feet (don't know the brand name). I wore Bridgedale socks from Sierra Trading Post, no liner socks. I do need camp shoes, though, and am open for suggestions for ultra-light sandals. Thru hikers tell me they are useful for stream crossings. I don't like to hike in wet boots, and have no desire to tear up my feet by going barefoot.
         
        As a result of this experience, I am training to get myself in shape to do a long section hike of the PCT. I have no desire to hike the whole thing, but 5 days was NOT ENOUGH.
         
        Here are some gear modifications based on hammock camping:
        1. A down blanket which can also be used as a jacket. Hood would be footbox.
        2. Keep my insualtion set up, but substitute small elastic bungee for the parachute cord.
        3. LONGER HANGING STRAPS!!!
        4. Leave the GPS and binoculars at home (I already knew that going in, LOL!)
        5. Lighter jacket, like one of Brawny's silnylons, instead of my Goretex, which was way overkill.
        6. No swimsuit. People in CA don't care if you swim naked, unlike in the deep South. I didn't know...
        7. Get off coffee for a long hike. I love it, but it's heavy and my morning ritual with it lasts at least an hour.
        8. Alcohol stove instead of my MSR Pocket Rocket. This is a great little stove, but I saw, for the first time, a well made alcohol stove and cound not believe it!  All the thru-hikers are using alcohol stove. Now I hear even REI is selling de-natured alcohol. We were making fun of REI in the hot tub Friday night, how slick and disgusting they are....remembering when we thought they were so cool.....
        9. No cotton t-shirts. Get bigger synthetics.
        10. Long synthetic shirt with long sleeves to use as a bug shirt. I went through 2 bottles of Deet in 5 days.
        11. The green mosquito head net just irritated me. I could not see through it.
        12. No cell phone. It didn't work out there. I took it because both of my parents are seriously ill and I thought I could check for voice mail on tops of ridges. I couldn't. A phone card will do just as well. In a true emergency, you can borrow someone else's cell because lots of people are carrying them and hikers are generous. 
        13. Water purification: switch from the iodine tabs to the liquid chlorine stuff (which you cannot buy in The People's Republic of California) but was available at the REI in Reno and I wish I had bought it there when I was staring at it Friday. I ferried some civilization-hungry thru-hikers down there from Truckee in my rental car and the only thing I bought for myself was a book on knots for the outdoors.
         
        RENO SUSHI BULLETIN: For you sushi fanatacs, if you are in the Reno area, there are some all-you-can-eat sushi restaurants, called "Sushi Pier".  The lunch cost is $12. You should see hungry thru hikers put away sushi!! I thought I was a sushi fanatic, but this skinny thru hiker I was with must have eaten about half his weight in the stuff. He also drank a lot of beer, which is how they make their $ back.
         
        ABOUT CALIFORNIA: I loved it, except for their tendency to have the government stick its nose into everything. I noticed they even have to register canoes out there! YICK! I am not an arch-conservative, but even I was starting to get irritated with all the government regs. Still, it was nice not get disdainful looks when I went out in public without a bra. Heck, I was one of the minority of non-tatooed, non-pierced. And I think I will keep it that way!
         
        MARSANNE   
      • Coy
        Hi Marsanne Now I m jealous. Sounds like you had a great time. I loved the alpine lakes of Colarodo, Hope to return for some serious backpacking one day. I
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 20, 2003
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          Hi Marsanne

          Now I'm jealous. Sounds like you had a great time. I loved the
          alpine lakes of Colarodo, Hope to return for some serious
          backpacking one day. I might skip this area due to the crowds but
          you take what you can get. I hear the Trinity Alps are less
          crowded. To bad you skipped on the piercing and tatoos. But... I'd
          of done the same.

          You mentioned wanting a down blanket and using the hood for a foot
          bag, some down quilts have foot boxes built in. Then you could
          reverse it when draping it in camp using the foot box for the hood.
          But it would drag the ground unless you had a way to take it up some
          and the footbox would probably be way big for a hood. You would be
          blinded. Maybe some way to let out (open up)some of the footbox for
          jacket use. If you really want a jacket/sleeping bag look at the
          Feathered Friends bag made just for this. I forget the name of the
          bag but I like the concept.

          Coy Boy

          -- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "firefly" <firefly@e...> wrote:
          > Hi All,
          > I just returned from my trip to the Tahoe-area for a business
          conference,
          > and then hiking. My flight from Reno landed last night.
          >
          > I went into Desolation Wilderness at Echo Lake, near Lake Tahoe,
          last
          > Sunday. Every hiker in CA knows about Desolation. This section is
          very
          > heavily used by day-hikers and family campers. If I had known
          that, I would
          > have carried much less gear and gone further in. I just wanted to
          relax,
          > though, so purposely carried a heavy pack with lots of junk in it
          which I
          > would never usually use. (Binoculars, GPS, 2 beers, coffee, fresh
          fruit,
          > extra clothes, even a bear cannister, etc.).
          >
          > One of the coolest things about this area is the seasonal water
          taxi that
          > takes you on a stunning 5 mile ride through upper and lower Echo
          Lakes. I
          > caught the last one in Sunday evening (7pm) and about flipped when
          I saw the
          > scenery. I will eventually upload pictures, but they don't do it
          justice, of
          > course. I made it in to the first lake (Tamarack) which was only a
          mile or
          > so in, just inside the wilderness boundary. I had already had
          dinner, so I
          > hung my hammock beside the lake and then...THE MOSQUITOES HIT. I
          was so glad
          > I had already had dinner. I taunted them from inside the hammock.
          I had
          > trouble sleeping that night because of the cold. No idea what the
          temps
          > were, but there were melting snow patches nearby. I was using the
          Z-rest.
          > The next day I left my gear there, took the water taxi back to my
          rental
          > car, and went into S.Lake Tahoe and Tahoe City to make some gear
          > modifications. I also called my travel agent and had him delay my
          flight
          > another day so I could spend one more day in paradise.
          >
          > I made it to an auto parts store and got a small windshield
          screen with
          > Mylar on one side. (The one I had torn up and thrown away 2 days
          before due
          > to its bulk was big enough for my Jeep). That night, I slept on
          top of it
          > and the Z-rest, which I had cut into pieces like someone here had
          suggested.
          > This configuration kept me warm, but the pieces kept sliding
          around. I fixed
          > this the next day by sewing them together with my tiny SA knife and
          > parachute cord. I took pictures and will upload somewhere later.
          This worked
          > VERY well. I also rigged a line up to the ridge line in my
          Hennessy to
          > prevent the setup from sliding down as I am getting in the hammock.
          >
          > After 2 nights at Tamarak Lake, I moved over to Aloha Lake. I
          had trouble
          > finding a place to pitch my hammock because most of the trees are
          too big
          > for the straps. I ended up pitching it right next to the trail. No
          one
          > seemed to mind. People ignored me if I was in the hammock, and
          either just
          > smiled and said a quick hello as they passed or said nice things
          about the
          > hammock if I was outside it. Several thru-hikers stopped to
          marvel at it
          > and I think at least one eventually ordered one. The Forest
          Service ranger
          > who stopped to check my permit made nice comments about the
          hammock's
          > environmentally-friendly aspects and said she might get one for
          herself. I
          > slept so well in my Hennessy that when I got back to civilization
          Thursday
          > night I missed it. I stayed with some friends in Truckee and was
          packing up
          > my camping gear to ship home because, of course, I went shopping
          in Reno and
          > could not possibly get all this stuff on the plane. I slept on a
          futon for
          > 2 nights, missing my hammock.
          >
          > I continued to have trouble with mosquitoes due to the melting
          snow. My
          > friend Bill says it will all be melted and gone in 2 weeks or so,
          if any of
          > you are thinking about going into this area.
          >
          > I didn't really need the bear cannister, but it did come in
          handy under
          > the circumstances because of the aggressive chipmonks and the fact
          that I
          > did a couple of long day hikes. My cannister weighs 2.7 pounds. I
          used it as
          > a stool when there was no convenient rock. I won't take it again
          unless
          > necessary, but I have always had trouble hanging food and am
          thinking
          > something lighter, like a widemouth plexiglass jar, to protect from
          > chipmonks, would not be a bad idea.
          >
          > I also switched from one hiking pole to 2, after I met a fine,
          very young,
          > in-shape thru-hiker who was using 2. I bought a pair in S. Lake
          Tahoe and
          > used them with their rubber tips, like cross country skis. I truly
          believed
          > they saved my knees, especially considering my heavy pack.
          >
          > For the first time ever, I DID NOT GET BLISTERS! I used Lowa
          Renegades,
          > with some $40 insoles I bought at Just For Feet (don't know the
          brand name).
          > I wore Bridgedale socks from Sierra Trading Post, no liner socks.
          I do need
          > camp shoes, though, and am open for suggestions for ultra-light
          sandals.
          > Thru hikers tell me they are useful for stream crossings. I don't
          like to
          > hike in wet boots, and have no desire to tear up my feet by going
          barefoot.
          >
          > As a result of this experience, I am training to get myself in
          shape to do
          > a long section hike of the PCT. I have no desire to hike the whole
          thing,
          > but 5 days was NOT ENOUGH.
          >
          > Here are some gear modifications based on hammock camping:
          > 1. A down blanket which can also be used as a jacket. Hood would
          be
          > footbox.
          > 2. Keep my insualtion set up, but substitute small elastic
          bungee for the
          > parachute cord.
          > 3. LONGER HANGING STRAPS!!!
          > 4. Leave the GPS and binoculars at home (I already knew that
          going in,
          > LOL!)
          > 5. Lighter jacket, like one of Brawny's silnylons, instead of my
          Goretex,
          > which was way overkill.
          > 6. No swimsuit. People in CA don't care if you swim naked,
          unlike in the
          > deep South. I didn't know...
          > 7. Get off coffee for a long hike. I love it, but it's heavy and
          my
          > morning ritual with it lasts at least an hour.
          > 8. Alcohol stove instead of my MSR Pocket Rocket. This is a
          great little
          > stove, but I saw, for the first time, a well made alcohol stove
          and cound
          > not believe it! All the thru-hikers are using alcohol stove. Now
          I hear
          > even REI is selling de-natured alcohol. We were making fun of REI
          in the hot
          > tub Friday night, how slick and disgusting they are....remembering
          when we
          > thought they were so cool.....
          > 9. No cotton t-shirts. Get bigger synthetics.
          > 10. Long synthetic shirt with long sleeves to use as a bug
          shirt. I went
          > through 2 bottles of Deet in 5 days.
          > 11. The green mosquito head net just irritated me. I could not
          see through
          > it.
          > 12. No cell phone. It didn't work out there. I took it because
          both of my
          > parents are seriously ill and I thought I could check for voice
          mail on tops
          > of ridges. I couldn't. A phone card will do just as well. In a true
          > emergency, you can borrow someone else's cell because lots of
          people are
          > carrying them and hikers are generous.
          > 13. Water purification: switch from the iodine tabs to the
          liquid chlorine
          > stuff (which you cannot buy in The People's Republic of
          California) but was
          > available at the REI in Reno and I wish I had bought it there when
          I was
          > staring at it Friday. I ferried some civilization-hungry thru-
          hikers down
          > there from Truckee in my rental car and the only thing I bought
          for myself
          > was a book on knots for the outdoors.
          >
          > RENO SUSHI BULLETIN: For you sushi fanatacs, if you are in the
          Reno area,
          > there are some all-you-can-eat sushi restaurants, called "Sushi
          Pier". The
          > lunch cost is $12. You should see hungry thru hikers put away
          sushi!! I
          > thought I was a sushi fanatic, but this skinny thru hiker I was
          with must
          > have eaten about half his weight in the stuff. He also drank a lot
          of beer,
          > which is how they make their $ back.
          >
          > ABOUT CALIFORNIA: I loved it, except for their tendency to have
          the
          > government stick its nose into everything. I noticed they even
          have to
          > register canoes out there! YICK! I am not an arch-conservative,
          but even I
          > was starting to get irritated with all the government regs. Still,
          it was
          > nice not get disdainful looks when I went out in public without a
          bra. Heck,
          > I was one of the minority of non-tatooed, non-pierced. And I think
          I will
          > keep it that way!
          >
          > MARSANNE
        • o123david
          It sounds like had a great trip. I hope you get to spend more time on the PCT. Just some feedback/opinions. Essentially no thruhikers carry binoculars but good
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 20, 2003
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            It sounds like had a great trip. I hope you get to spend more time on
            the PCT. Just some feedback/opinions.

            Essentially no thruhikers carry binoculars but good lightweight ones
            are nice for viewing birds and wildlife.

            The maps in the guidebook, a watch for mileage, and a simple compass
            for bad weather are all you need for navigation. The databook is also
            good. A GPS in unnecessary.

            You should never be without breathable top and bottom, OR headnet,
            and DEET - except maybe the headnet while still south of LA. The
            bugs, especially in low meadows, can be a nightmare.

            Adam used a hammock for a PCT thruhike. I used one partway. Others
            are apparently using them this year. Unlike what I have heard from
            others, I found the western forests relatively open, windy, and cold.
            The solution that works for me is to use the normal pad below and bag
            or down blanket above but add something to block the wind. When
            needed, just add a ring of thin polyethylene hanging from duct tape
            that hangs from the two ends of your hammock where the cords or
            straps come out. If the ring of duct tape is the right length it sags
            as the hammock sags and blocks the wind where it should be blocked.
            You don't have a moisture problem because you still have cool dry air
            coming up from below and warm air exiting above carrying the moisture
            away. It's lightweight and doesn't block the entrance of either a
            Hennessy or Speer.

            NunatakUSA makes an excellent down blanket with foot pocket for into
            the 30's called the Ghost and for into the 20's called the Arc
            Alpinist.

            Instead of boots most PCT thruhikers use trail or running shoes, with
            Spenco or Superfeet insoles and one pair of marino wool socks. Things
            dry fast after stream crossings. You should be careful to start with
            a pair large enough in the toe area for a day of hard hiking in the
            heat with a pack and understand that for most hikers feet grow
            permanently both wider and longer during a long hike.
            RoadrunnerSports is great for quick resupply during the hike. The
            most popular shoe is the New Balance 806's. I've switched to Chaco
            sandals, find they have great built-in support, and love them for
            everything but when it is both cold and there is snow.

            Except for where the bears are a problem or near an AT shelter or
            campground where rodents are a problem I find that a silnylon
            stuffsack hanging a couple feet off the ground always works fine for
            protecting my food.

            REI sold the Trangia alcohol stove years before the homemade ones
            became popular and they still sell them. The same is true for the
            little Esbit solid fuel stoves as well as a lot of other lightweight
            items, including Hennessy hammocks. The problem is they can only
            carry things that the supplier can provide in large enough quantities
            and with limited store space it only makes sense that they display
            the items that sell the best.

            Hope you find this helpful. --David
          • Ed Speer
            Sounds like quite a trip Marsanne! Amazing what a few days in the back country can do for the soul....Ed ... From: firefly [mailto:firefly@eatel.net] Sent:
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 21, 2003
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              Message
              Sounds like quite a trip Marsanne!  Amazing what a few days in the back country can do for the soul....Ed
               
              -----Original Message-----
              From: firefly [mailto:firefly@...]
              Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 12:50 PM
              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Hammock Camping Desolation Wilderness Report

              Hi All,
              I just returned from my trip to the Tahoe-area for a business conference, and then hiking. My flight from Reno landed last night.
               
              I went into Desolation Wilderness at Echo Lake, near Lake Tahoe, last Sunday. Every hiker in CA knows about Desolation. This section is very heavily used by day-hikers and family campers. If I had known that, I would have carried much less gear and gone further in. I just wanted to relax, though, so purposely carried a heavy pack with lots of junk in it which I would never usually use. (Binoculars, GPS, 2 beers, coffee, fresh fruit, extra clothes, even a bear cannister, etc.).  
                 
              One of the coolest things about this area is the seasonal water taxi that takes you on a stunning 5 mile ride through upper and lower Echo Lakes. I caught the last one in Sunday evening (7pm) and about flipped when I saw the scenery. I will eventually upload pictures, but they don't do it justice, of course. I made it in to the first lake (Tamarack) which was only a mile or so in, just inside the wilderness boundary. I had already had dinner, so I hung my hammock beside the lake and then...THE MOSQUITOES HIT. I was so glad I had already had dinner. I taunted them from inside the hammock. I had trouble sleeping that night because of the cold. No idea what the temps were, but there were melting snow patches nearby. I was using the Z-rest. The next day I left my gear there, took the water taxi back to my rental car, and went into S.Lake Tahoe and Tahoe City to make some gear modifications. I also called my travel agent and had him delay my flight another day so I could spend one more day in paradise.  
               
              I made it to an auto parts store and got a small windshield screen with Mylar on one side. (The one I had torn up and thrown away 2 days before due to its bulk was big enough for my Jeep).  That night, I slept on top of it and the Z-rest, which I had cut into pieces like someone here had suggested. This configuration kept me warm, but the pieces kept sliding around. I fixed this the next day by sewing them together with my tiny SA knife and parachute cord. I took pictures and will upload somewhere later. This worked VERY well. I also rigged a line up to the ridge line in my Hennessy to prevent the setup from sliding down as I am getting in the hammock.
               
              After 2 nights at Tamarak Lake, I moved over to Aloha Lake. I had trouble finding a place to pitch my hammock because most of the trees are too big for the straps. I ended up pitching it right next to the trail. No one seemed to mind. People ignored me if I was in the hammock, and either just smiled and said a quick hello as they passed or said nice things about the hammock if I was outside it.  Several thru-hikers stopped to marvel at it and I think at least one eventually ordered one. The Forest Service ranger who stopped to check my permit made nice comments about the hammock's environmentally-friendly aspects and said she might get one for herself. I slept so well in my Hennessy that when I got back to civilization Thursday night I missed it. I stayed with some friends in Truckee and was packing up my camping gear to ship home because, of course, I went shopping in Reno and could not possibly get all this stuff on the plane.  I slept on a futon for 2 nights, missing my hammock.
               
              I continued to have trouble with mosquitoes due to the melting snow. My friend Bill says it will all be melted and gone in 2 weeks or so, if any of you are thinking about going into this area.
               
              I didn't really need the bear cannister, but it did come in handy under the circumstances because of the aggressive chipmonks and the fact that I did a couple of long day hikes. My cannister weighs 2.7 pounds. I used it as a stool when there was no convenient rock. I won't take it again unless necessary, but I have always had trouble hanging food and am thinking something lighter, like a widemouth plexiglass jar, to protect from chipmonks, would not be a bad idea.
               
              I also switched from one hiking pole to 2, after I met a fine, very young, in-shape thru-hiker who was using 2. I bought a pair in S. Lake Tahoe and used them with their rubber tips, like cross country skis. I truly believed they saved my knees, especially considering my heavy pack.
               
              For the first time ever, I DID NOT GET BLISTERS! I used Lowa Renegades, with some $40 insoles I bought at Just For Feet (don't know the brand name). I wore Bridgedale socks from Sierra Trading Post, no liner socks. I do need camp shoes, though, and am open for suggestions for ultra-light sandals. Thru hikers tell me they are useful for stream crossings. I don't like to hike in wet boots, and have no desire to tear up my feet by going barefoot.
               
              As a result of this experience, I am training to get myself in shape to do a long section hike of the PCT. I have no desire to hike the whole thing, but 5 days was NOT ENOUGH.
               
              Here are some gear modifications based on hammock camping:
              1. A down blanket which can also be used as a jacket. Hood would be footbox.
              2. Keep my insualtion set up, but substitute small elastic bungee for the parachute cord.
              3. LONGER HANGING STRAPS!!!
              4. Leave the GPS and binoculars at home (I already knew that going in, LOL!)
              5. Lighter jacket, like one of Brawny's silnylons, instead of my Goretex, which was way overkill.
              6. No swimsuit. People in CA don't care if you swim naked, unlike in the deep South. I didn't know...
              7. Get off coffee for a long hike. I love it, but it's heavy and my morning ritual with it lasts at least an hour.
              8. Alcohol stove instead of my MSR Pocket Rocket. This is a great little stove, but I saw, for the first time, a well made alcohol stove and cound not believe it!  All the thru-hikers are using alcohol stove. Now I hear even REI is selling de-natured alcohol. We were making fun of REI in the hot tub Friday night, how slick and disgusting they are....remembering when we thought they were so cool.....
              9. No cotton t-shirts. Get bigger synthetics.
              10. Long synthetic shirt with long sleeves to use as a bug shirt. I went through 2 bottles of Deet in 5 days.
              11. The green mosquito head net just irritated me. I could not see through it.
              12. No cell phone. It didn't work out there. I took it because both of my parents are seriously ill and I thought I could check for voice mail on tops of ridges. I couldn't. A phone card will do just as well. In a true emergency, you can borrow someone else's cell because lots of people are carrying them and hikers are generous. 
              13. Water purification: switch from the iodine tabs to the liquid chlorine stuff (which you cannot buy in The People's Republic of California) but was available at the REI in Reno and I wish I had bought it there when I was staring at it Friday. I ferried some civilization-hungry thru-hikers down there from Truckee in my rental car and the only thing I bought for myself was a book on knots for the outdoors.
               
              RENO SUSHI BULLETIN: For you sushi fanatacs, if you are in the Reno area, there are some all-you-can-eat sushi restaurants, called "Sushi Pier".  The lunch cost is $12. You should see hungry thru hikers put away sushi!! I thought I was a sushi fanatic, but this skinny thru hiker I was with must have eaten about half his weight in the stuff. He also drank a lot of beer, which is how they make their $ back.
               
              ABOUT CALIFORNIA: I loved it, except for their tendency to have the government stick its nose into everything. I noticed they even have to register canoes out there! YICK! I am not an arch-conservative, but even I was starting to get irritated with all the government regs. Still, it was nice not get disdainful looks when I went out in public without a bra. Heck, I was one of the minority of non-tatooed, non-pierced. And I think I will keep it that way!
               
              MARSANNE   


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            • Ed Speer
              ... bag ... sags as the hammock sags and blocks the wind where it should be blocked. You don t have a moisture problem because you still have cool dry air
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 31, 2003
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                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "o123david" <o123david@y...>
                wrote:

                > The solution that works for me is to use the normal pad below and
                bag
                > or down blanket above but add something to block the wind. When
                > needed, just add a ring of thin polyethylene hanging from duct tape
                > that hangs from the two ends of your hammock where the cords or
                > straps come out. If the ring of duct tape is the right length it
                sags as the hammock sags and blocks the wind where it should be
                blocked. You don't have a moisture problem because you still have
                cool dry air coming up from below and warm air exiting above carrying
                the moisture
                > away. It's lightweight and doesn't block the entrance of either a
                > Hennessy or Speer.
                >
                > Hope you find this helpful. --David

                David, can you offer a better description of your polyethylene rings
                w/ duct tape? This sounds interesting, but I can't envision it. Does
                the poly sheeting go completely under the hammock? Do you have any
                photos? Thanks....Ed
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