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Re: [Hammock Camping] Need help!

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  • chrislutz25@yahoo.com
    The underquilt works wonders. I made one out of a surplus sleeping bag liner for my Dad and myself. Its light, but provides good wind block and warmth. Sent
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 20 3:10 PM
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      The underquilt works wonders. I made one out of a surplus sleeping bag liner for my Dad and myself. Its light, but provides good wind block and warmth.
      Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

      -----Original Message-----
      From: EHamilton <imagainst_the_wind@...>
      Date: Tue, 20 Apr 2010 14:48:17
      To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Need help!

      Mbiraman -- Thank you for the encouragement and links. I realize it takes learning...�I need more�practice before I, um, hang it up. I'm about ready to do that today, last night was rough; but so many people love hammocks so much I have to assume the problem is that I'm not doing it right. Well, right for me....�what works is�different for everyone, I'm sure.

      Doug -- you�mentioned warm sleep clothing -- that was going to be my next step. I'm OK on top w/ 2 thin acrylic sweaters. Feet are good in wool or acrylic socks. But all I've had on my legs is my running tights, which were my warm layer on the AT but aren't making it alone in the hammock.

      TV -- Until last night I kept noticing that despite being cold I was very comfortable. A back issue was better after sleeping in the hammock. Until last night. Fighting with the Big Agnes pad, trying all night to scoot it around, avoiding getting strangled by the ridgeline, struggling to exit past pad + sleeping bag + bag liner + the backpack I'd stored at my feet ... today my back is sore. Another sign I'm making mistakes. I'm sleeping in bed tonight :-/

      Rich -- I'll definitely try my 8 X 10 tarp instead of the original fly and/or the custom one. It's a little on the heavy side, urethane-coated nylon, but worth a try. I'm a little confused how you rig your gear line.... under the hammock? Beside the hammock? The only way I can access an external line is through the bottom flap.

      Thanks for helping, everyone! I sure hope I get this figured out. Even though we flooded Dave's inbox....

      MacGyver




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    • Richard Perlman
      ... I rig the gear line above the hammock and hang my pack and shoes towards the ends. Rich [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 20 3:27 PM
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        EHamilton wrote:
        > Rich -- I'll definitely try my 8 X 10 tarp instead of the original fly and/or the custom one. It's a little on the heavy side, urethane-coated nylon, but worth a try. I'm a little confused how you rig your gear line.... under the hammock? Beside the hammock? The only way I can access an external line is through the bottom flap.
        >
        >
        >
        I rig the gear line above the hammock and hang my pack and shoes towards
        the ends.

        Rich


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      • EHamilton
        OK, above the hammock, but under the tarp. I m getting closer (warmer?) to picturing what you re describing. Longitudinal to the ridgeline, but looser, so it s
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 20 4:49 PM
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          OK, above the hammock, but under the tarp. I'm getting closer (warmer?) to picturing what you're describing. Longitudinal to the ridgeline, but looser, so it's below the hammock? or what?

          MacGyver (who maybe should change her Trail name)




          ________________________________
          From: Richard Perlman richard@...


          >
          >
          I rig the gear line above the hammock and hang my pack and shoes towards
          the ends.

          Rich

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        • Cara Lin Bridgman
          Like others, I almost immediately ditched pads for a JacksRBetter underquilt: nest. I found I need some sort of bottom insulation as soon as the temperature
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 20 11:10 PM
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            Like others, I almost immediately ditched pads for a JacksRBetter
            underquilt: nest. I found I need some sort of bottom insulation as soon
            as the temperature gets below 27*C (about 80*F). The thing is, I'm cold
            with the JRB nest when the temperatures get below 8*C (47*F)--and that's
            when there's no wind. Then, I have to put the pad back inside AND I
            have to use spare clothes, stuffsacs, etc, to keep shoulders and knees
            and heels warm. Messing with all the sacs and pads and clothes and
            things makes even more of a hassle my midnight runs to the bathroom.

            I use Hennessey's Backpacker Asym when in the field. I bought the
            mid-sized McCat tarp for improved coverage. Even when the temperatures
            are near 0*C, though, I don't want to use the tarp if it is clear. The
            best thing about the hammock is being able to see stars again.

            I've not had any trouble with the JacksRBetter No-sniveller keeping the
            top side of me warm enough down to 0*C. It's always been the bottom
            side that's difficult. I'm now 'saving' up the money for JRB's Mt.
            Washington quilt.

            CL
            who is gradually facing the fact that when hiking in subtropical
            Taiwan's sub-alpine zone, hammocks are just heavier than
            tents--temperatures here can approach 0*C any time of the year.
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