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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

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  • Tom Frazier
    Yup, looked them up...they were 12 foot lengths of nylon cord. Stretched like rubber-man on the rack . Tom ... From: Jerry Goller To:
    Message 1 of 25 , Oct 15, 2009
      Yup, looked them up...they were 12 foot lengths of nylon cord. Stretched like rubber-man on "the rack".

      Tom

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Jerry Goller
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 2:17 PM
      Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree


      They must have been nylon, then. Poly doesn't, for all practical purposes,
      stretch.

      Jerry

      http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
      reviews and tests on the planet.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of Tom Frazier
      Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 3:08 PM
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

      I use the 1" wide climbing straps (got mine at REI) along with a
      cinch-buckle for the straps and I sewed a loop at the end of the cord and
      attached a climbing-rated carabiner for a quick-connect/quick-release set
      up. I don't get any stretch either. I did when I used the old poly cords
      that came with my older claytor hammock...those stretched like undersized
      socks on a giant!

      Tom

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Jerry Goller
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:36 AM
      Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

      I have to admit, I'm mildly mystified by this thread. What straps and
      cord
      material are you all using? I'm not getting *that* much sag on my hammock
      when I get in it.

      Jerry

      http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
      reviews and tests on the planet.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of lpon2000
      Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:46 AM
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

      The further apart the trees are, the higher you have to get the suspension
      on the trees. I use the point of a trekking pole to lift and raise the
      straps on the trunk of the tree. An extensible trekking pole is useful as
      a
      porch strut for the tarp as well. The straps are generally loose enough on
      the trunk when there is no weight in the hammock. I have also used trees
      with a lot of small branches - put the tip of the pole in the biner or
      loop
      and shove it through high branches.

      Lori

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David" <delliott78@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have recently revisited Dave Womble's excellent files on the forces on
      hammock suspensions and ridgelines here:
      >
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping/files/Youngblood%27s/
      >
      > I like to hang my dog's hammock under mine, so I tighten the support
      ropes
      to raise my hammock and make room for his. This greatly increases the
      forces on the support ropes and structural ridgeline. (Both hammocks hang
      from the same points at the ends of the ridgeline.) Add in the extra 70
      lb.
      that the dog weighs for more force. Then consider the occasional need to
      use trees that are farther apart. My 7/64" amsteel support ropes are cut
      to
      handle tree-to-tree separations of up to 25 ft., but I've only been able
      to
      use that use that a couple of times, and the tension is scary. (I usually
      try to do this across a hollow, so I have the benefit of extra height,
      hence
      more sag. My question is this: has anyone devised a method of attaching
      tree huggers higher, possibly using hiking poles or forked sticks? I'd
      like
      to be able to easily place my tree huggers about two or three feet higher
      than I can reach (and retrieve them easily the next morning). I use a
      hammock because about 25 years ago I lost my ability to sleep soundly on
      roots and rocks. Somewhere along the way my enthusiasm for shinnying up
      trees with a strap in my mouth went away, too.
      >

      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links

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      http://www.eset.com

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      signature
      database 4510 (20091015) __________

      The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links

      __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature
      database 4511 (20091015) __________

      The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

      http://www.eset.com

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      database 4511 (20091015) __________

      The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

      http://www.eset.com






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rosaleen Sullivan
      Hi, Chris- I doubt there is a MAHHA website. Another hammock camper, inspired by Ed s SE hammocker gathering, threw out invitations and the loose association
      Message 2 of 25 , Oct 16, 2009
        Hi, Chris-



        I doubt there is a MAHHA website. Another hammock camper, inspired by Ed's SE hammocker gathering, threw out invitations and the loose association was born. They have met several times, maybe each spring and fall for two to four years. It is a bit of a trip for me, so I've not made many. The confusion as to where, is that Crampton Gap is within Maryland's Gathland State Park. So, if you are finding the meeting place from the AT, look for Crampton Gap. If you are driving, look up Gathland State Park. Either head for the shelter and water source from the Trail, or park at the big lot and head up the blue-blazed trail towards the AT to find the group. If you make plans ahead, someone might meet you in the lot to help you find your way, or at least let you know if anyone plans to put out extra flagging tape to help mark it.



        Don't know if all the plans will be the same, but in the past, the organizer has invited some gear manufacturers to come or donate items for a raffle, some DIY demos have been presented, and Saturday night thre was a group cookout. Everyone chipped in to help pay for the food and defray costs of the shelter rental, when someone reserved it. No promises as to whether or not anyone has done the legwork for this event. I've done it for other gatherings, and know it can be very time consuming. I have also seen a sort of a "yard sale" at which people sold off used gear. Again, I don't know if plans include this.



        Regards,



        Rosaleen





        MAHHA
        Posted by: "Chris Lutz" chrislutz25@... chrislutz25
        Date: Thu Oct 15, 2009 9:54 am ((PDT))

        I'd like to know more about this trip. Is there another website or something for MAHHA. I did a quick search and the forums said it was Crampton park not Gathland. Maybe last year though not current. Can someone help me out? Would love to attend. Thanks.

        Chris Lutz
        Sign up for online personal training
        www.spartafitnesstraining.com


        _________________________________________________________________
        Hotmail: Free, trusted and rich email service.
        http://clk.atdmt.com/GBL/go/171222984/direct/01/

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Arye P. R.
        Stretch is relative to multiple factors - the material, the weave, the length under load, and the strength (load capacity) of the rope/strap being used. All
        Message 3 of 25 , Oct 16, 2009
          Stretch is relative to multiple factors - the material, the weave, the length under load, and the strength (load capacity) of the rope/strap being used. All these factors determine the amount of stretch a user will get. Also how a material is treated by the manufacturer in manufacturing and how a material is treated by the end user in use.

          "poly" says nothing Used here it is a consumer abbreviation for a group of materials plastics rope fabric... Be specific, polyester or polypropylene. All have materials by end use manufacturer have different characteristics - abrasion, stretch, chemical, UV, resistance to name a few.

          SapereAude,

          Arye P. Rubenstein


          Imagination is more important than knowledge...
          It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education... Albert Einstein




          ________________________________
          From: Jerry Goller <jerrygoller@...>
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 4:17:02 PM
          Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree


          They must have been nylon, then. Poly doesn't, for all practical purposes,
          stretch.

          Jerry

          http://www.Backpack GearTest. org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
          reviews and tests on the planet.

          -----Original Message-----
          From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com]
          On Behalf Of Tom Frazier
          Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 3:08 PM
          To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

          I use the 1" wide climbing straps (got mine at REI) along with a
          cinch-buckle for the straps and I sewed a loop at the end of the cord and
          attached a climbing-rated carabiner for a quick-connect/ quick-release set
          up. I don't get any stretch either. I did when I used the old poly cords
          that came with my older claytor hammock...those stretched like undersized
          socks on a giant!

          Tom

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Jerry Goller
          To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:36 AM
          Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

          I have to admit, I'm mildly mystified by this thread. What straps and
          cord
          material are you all using? I'm not getting *that* much sag on my hammock
          when I get in it.

          Jerry

          http://www.Backpack GearTest. org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
          reviews and tests on the planet.

          -----Original Message-----
          From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
          [mailto:hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com]
          On Behalf Of lpon2000
          Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:46 AM
          To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

          The further apart the trees are, the higher you have to get the suspension
          on the trees. I use the point of a trekking pole to lift and raise the
          straps on the trunk of the tree. An extensible trekking pole is useful as
          a
          porch strut for the tarp as well. The straps are generally loose enough on
          the trunk when there is no weight in the hammock. I have also used trees
          with a lot of small branches - put the tip of the pole in the biner or
          loop
          and shove it through high branches.

          Lori

          --- In hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com, "David" <delliott78@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > I have recently revisited Dave Womble's excellent files on the forces on
          hammock suspensions and ridgelines here:
          >
          > http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/hammockcam ping/files/ Youngblood% 27s/
          >
          > I like to hang my dog's hammock under mine, so I tighten the support
          ropes
          to raise my hammock and make room for his. This greatly increases the
          forces on the support ropes and structural ridgeline. (Both hammocks hang
          from the same points at the ends of the ridgeline.) Add in the extra 70
          lb.
          that the dog weighs for more force. Then consider the occasional need to
          use trees that are farther apart. My 7/64" amsteel support ropes are cut
          to
          handle tree-to-tree separations of up to 25 ft., but I've only been able
          to
          use that use that a couple of times, and the tension is scary. (I usually
          try to do this across a hollow, so I have the benefit of extra height,
          hence
          more sag. My question is this: has anyone devised a method of attaching
          tree huggers higher, possibly using hiking poles or forked sticks? I'd
          like
          to be able to easily place my tree huggers about two or three feet higher
          than I can reach (and retrieve them easily the next morning). I use a
          hammock because about 25 years ago I lost my ability to sleep soundly on
          roots and rocks. Somewhere along the way my enthusiasm for shinnying up
          trees with a strap in my mouth went away, too.
          >

          ------------ --------- --------- ------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus
          signature
          database 4510 (20091015) __________

          The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

          http://www.eset. com

          __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus
          signature
          database 4510 (20091015) __________

          The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

          http://www.eset. com

          __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus
          signature
          database 4510 (20091015) __________

          The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

          http://www.eset. com

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          ------------ --------- --------- ------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature
          database 4511 (20091015) __________

          The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

          http://www.eset. com

          __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature
          database 4511 (20091015) __________

          The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

          http://www.eset. com





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jerry Goller
          True. Polypropylene is what I use most. Jerry http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the most comprehensive interactive gear reviews and tests on the planet. ...
          Message 4 of 25 , Oct 16, 2009
            True. Polypropylene is what I use most.

            Jerry


            http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
            reviews and tests on the planet.

            -----Original Message-----
            From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
            On Behalf Of Arye P. R.
            Sent: Friday, October 16, 2009 6:48 AM
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

            Stretch is relative to multiple factors - the material, the weave, the
            length under load, and the strength (load capacity) of the rope/strap being
            used. All these factors determine the amount of stretch a user will get.
            Also how a material is treated by the manufacturer in manufacturing and how
            a material is treated by the end user in use.

            "poly" says nothing Used here it is a consumer abbreviation for a group of
            materials plastics rope fabric... Be specific, polyester or polypropylene.
            All have materials by end use manufacturer have different characteristics -
            abrasion, stretch, chemical, UV, resistance to name a few.

            SapereAude,

            Arye P. Rubenstein


            Imagination is more important than knowledge...
            It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education... Albert Einstein




            ________________________________
            From: Jerry Goller <jerrygoller@...>
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 4:17:02 PM
            Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree


            They must have been nylon, then. Poly doesn't, for all practical purposes,
            stretch.

            Jerry

            http://www.Backpack GearTest. org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
            reviews and tests on the planet.

            -----Original Message-----
            From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:hammockcamping@ yahoogroups.
            com] On Behalf Of Tom Frazier
            Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 3:08 PM
            To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
            Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

            I use the 1" wide climbing straps (got mine at REI) along with a
            cinch-buckle for the straps and I sewed a loop at the end of the cord and
            attached a climbing-rated carabiner for a quick-connect/ quick-release set
            up. I don't get any stretch either. I did when I used the old poly cords
            that came with my older claytor hammock...those stretched like undersized
            socks on a giant!

            Tom

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Jerry Goller
            To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
            Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:36 AM
            Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

            I have to admit, I'm mildly mystified by this thread. What straps and cord
            material are you all using? I'm not getting *that* much sag on my hammock
            when I get in it.

            Jerry

            http://www.Backpack GearTest. org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
            reviews and tests on the planet.

            -----Original Message-----
            From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
            [mailto:hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of lpon2000
            Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:46 AM
            To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
            Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

            The further apart the trees are, the higher you have to get the suspension
            on the trees. I use the point of a trekking pole to lift and raise the
            straps on the trunk of the tree. An extensible trekking pole is useful as a
            porch strut for the tarp as well. The straps are generally loose enough on
            the trunk when there is no weight in the hammock. I have also used trees
            with a lot of small branches - put the tip of the pole in the biner or loop
            and shove it through high branches.

            Lori

            --- In hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com, "David" <delliott78@ ...> wrote:
            >
            > I have recently revisited Dave Womble's excellent files on the forces
            > on
            hammock suspensions and ridgelines here:
            >
            > http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/hammockcam ping/files/ Youngblood%
            > 27s/
            >
            > I like to hang my dog's hammock under mine, so I tighten the support
            ropes
            to raise my hammock and make room for his. This greatly increases the forces
            on the support ropes and structural ridgeline. (Both hammocks hang from the
            same points at the ends of the ridgeline.) Add in the extra 70 lb.
            that the dog weighs for more force. Then consider the occasional need to use
            trees that are farther apart. My 7/64" amsteel support ropes are cut to
            handle tree-to-tree separations of up to 25 ft., but I've only been able to
            use that use that a couple of times, and the tension is scary. (I usually
            try to do this across a hollow, so I have the benefit of extra height, hence
            more sag. My question is this: has anyone devised a method of attaching tree
            huggers higher, possibly using hiking poles or forked sticks? I'd like to be
            able to easily place my tree huggers about two or three feet higher than I
            can reach (and retrieve them easily the next morning). I use a hammock
            because about 25 years ago I lost my ability to sleep soundly on roots and
            rocks. Somewhere along the way my enthusiasm for shinnying up trees with a
            strap in my mouth went away, too.
            >

            ------------ --------- --------- ------

            Yahoo! Groups Links

            __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature
            database 4510 (20091015) __________

            The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

            http://www.eset. com

            __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature
            database 4510 (20091015) __________

            The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

            http://www.eset. com

            __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature
            database 4510 (20091015) __________

            The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

            http://www.eset. com

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            ------------ --------- --------- ------

            Yahoo! Groups Links

            __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature
            database 4511 (20091015) __________

            The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

            http://www.eset. com

            __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature
            database 4511 (20091015) __________

            The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

            http://www.eset. com





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links




            __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature
            database 4515 (20091016) __________

            The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

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          • paulkaercher
            There are 2 threads on Hammock Forums: http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=9523 & http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=11146 All
            Message 5 of 25 , Oct 16, 2009
            • Arye P. R.
              and Polypropylene is the almost the worst to use in the yard and exposed to SUN and weather. It will fail much faster than nylon or polyester given the same
              Message 6 of 25 , Oct 16, 2009
                and Polypropylene is the almost the worst to use in the yard and exposed to SUN and weather. It will fail much faster than nylon or polyester given the same factors. Amsteel, Dacron, Dyneema, Mylar, KRYPTON-D etc. are all BRANDS and blends of polyester and/or UHMPE (UHMWPE) Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Ropes which are more expensive but give the best performance for hammocking over time. A polyester product is the way to go for us.

                for more types of rope/line than you will ever need see the following sites.
                They also have good charts spelling out strength and stretch factore of most ropes
                <http://www.cbknot.com/CommercialFishing.htm>
                <http://www.cbknot.com/recreationalmarine.htm>

                SapereAude,

                Arye P. Rubenstein


                Imagination is more important than knowledge...
                It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education... Albert Einstein




                ________________________________
                From: Jerry Goller <jerrygoller@...>
                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, October 16, 2009 10:56:11 AM
                Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree


                True. Polypropylene is what I use most.

                Jerry

                http://www.Backpack GearTest. org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
                reviews and tests on the planet.

                -----Original Message-----
                From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com]
                On Behalf Of Arye P. R.
                Sent: Friday, October 16, 2009 6:48 AM
                To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                Stretch is relative to multiple factors - the material, the weave, the
                length under load, and the strength (load capacity) of the rope/strap being
                used. All these factors determine the amount of stretch a user will get.
                Also how a material is treated by the manufacturer in manufacturing and how
                a material is treated by the end user in use.

                "poly" says nothing Used here it is a consumer abbreviation for a group of
                materials plastics rope fabric... Be specific, polyester or polypropylene.
                All have materials by end use manufacturer have different characteristics -
                abrasion, stretch, chemical, UV, resistance to name a few.

                SapereAude,

                Arye P. Rubenstein

                Imagination is more important than knowledge...
                It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education... Albert Einstein

                ____________ _________ _________ __
                From: Jerry Goller <jerrygoller@ backpackgeartest .org>
                To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 4:17:02 PM
                Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                They must have been nylon, then. Poly doesn't, for all practical purposes,
                stretch.

                Jerry

                http://www.Backpack GearTest. org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
                reviews and tests on the planet.

                -----Original Message-----
                From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:hammockcamping@ yahoogroups.
                com] On Behalf Of Tom Frazier
                Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 3:08 PM
                To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                I use the 1" wide climbing straps (got mine at REI) along with a
                cinch-buckle for the straps and I sewed a loop at the end of the cord and
                attached a climbing-rated carabiner for a quick-connect/ quick-release set
                up. I don't get any stretch either. I did when I used the old poly cords
                that came with my older claytor hammock...those stretched like undersized
                socks on a giant!

                Tom

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Jerry Goller
                To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:36 AM
                Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                I have to admit, I'm mildly mystified by this thread. What straps and cord
                material are you all using? I'm not getting *that* much sag on my hammock
                when I get in it.

                Jerry

                http://www.Backpack GearTest. org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
                reviews and tests on the planet.

                -----Original Message-----
                From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                [mailto:hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of lpon2000
                Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:46 AM
                To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                The further apart the trees are, the higher you have to get the suspension
                on the trees. I use the point of a trekking pole to lift and raise the
                straps on the trunk of the tree. An extensible trekking pole is useful as a
                porch strut for the tarp as well. The straps are generally loose enough on
                the trunk when there is no weight in the hammock. I have also used trees
                with a lot of small branches - put the tip of the pole in the biner or loop
                and shove it through high branches.

                Lori

                --- In hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com, "David" <delliott78@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > I have recently revisited Dave Womble's excellent files on the forces
                > on
                hammock suspensions and ridgelines here:
                >
                > http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/hammockcam ping/files/ Youngblood%
                > 27s/
                >
                > I like to hang my dog's hammock under mine, so I tighten the support
                ropes
                to raise my hammock and make room for his. This greatly increases the forces
                on the support ropes and structural ridgeline. (Both hammocks hang from the
                same points at the ends of the ridgeline.) Add in the extra 70 lb.
                that the dog weighs for more force. Then consider the occasional need to use
                trees that are farther apart. My 7/64" amsteel support ropes are cut to
                handle tree-to-tree separations of up to 25 ft., but I've only been able to
                use that use that a couple of times, and the tension is scary. (I usually
                try to do this across a hollow, so I have the benefit of extra height, hence
                more sag. My question is this: has anyone devised a method of attaching tree
                huggers higher, possibly using hiking poles or forked sticks? I'd like to be
                able to easily place my tree huggers about two or three feet higher than I
                can reach (and retrieve them easily the next morning). I use a hammock
                because about 25 years ago I lost my ability to sleep soundly on roots and
                rocks. Somewhere along the way my enthusiasm for shinnying up trees with a
                strap in my mouth went away, too.
                >

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              • Jerry Goller
                True, but none of those come in 2 webbing, as far as I know. Considering that I have some straps that are 3 or 4 years old, and it would cost me about $10 a
                Message 7 of 25 , Oct 16, 2009
                  True, but none of those come in 2" webbing, as far as I know. Considering
                  that I have some straps that are 3 or 4 years old, and it would cost me
                  about $10 a year, max, to replace them every year, I don't think I'll bother
                  looking for any of those in 2" webbing..... ;o) Polypro is inexpensive,
                  light, hydrophobic, and doesn't stretch.

                  I'm not really concerned about over time, just this season.

                  Worrying about long lasting ropes reminded me of one time when I was living
                  on South Padre Island, TX. Backpacking is pretty much unheard of in South
                  Texas. I was at the dumpster at my apartment. I was tossing about $2,000.00
                  worth of packs away. There was nothing wrong with them. They were in great
                  shape. But they had all outlived their usefulness to me. They were too heavy
                  and/or not as comfortable as more modern packs. There was no one to give
                  them to. All I could think of as I tossed those packs in the dumpster was
                  all that weight in over-engineering and money I had wasted on those packs.
                  They were replaced with better, lighter packs long before they wore out.

                  When Wayne Gregory was designing the Z-Pack he called me for advice on light
                  weight packs. I kiddingly told him that the perfect long distance pack for,
                  say the AT, would be one that as I raised my arms in victory on Katadyn
                  would fall apart. That way I'd know I hadn't carried one single ounce of
                  pack I didn't need for those 2100 miles.

                  I don't plan on leaving my gear for posterity. As long as it lasts one
                  season, and does exactly what I want it to do, I'm happy. I can't ever
                  remember actually wearing a piece of backpacking gear out in 55+ years of
                  backpacking.

                  Jerry




                  http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
                  reviews and tests on the planet.

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
                  On Behalf Of Arye P. R.
                  Sent: Friday, October 16, 2009 7:09 PM
                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                  and Polypropylene is the almost the worst to use in the yard and exposed to
                  SUN and weather. It will fail much faster than nylon or polyester given the
                  same factors. Amsteel, Dacron, Dyneema, Mylar, KRYPTON-D etc. are all BRANDS
                  and blends of polyester and/or UHMPE (UHMWPE) Ultra High Molecular Weight
                  Polyethylene Ropes which are more expensive but give the best performance
                  for hammocking over time. A polyester product is the way to go for us.

                  for more types of rope/line than you will ever need see the following sites.

                  They also have good charts spelling out strength and stretch factore of most
                  ropes <http://www.cbknot.com/CommercialFishing.htm>
                  <http://www.cbknot.com/recreationalmarine.htm>

                  SapereAude,

                  Arye P. Rubenstein


                  Imagination is more important than knowledge...
                  It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education... Albert Einstein




                  ________________________________
                  From: Jerry Goller <jerrygoller@...>
                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Friday, October 16, 2009 10:56:11 AM
                  Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree


                  True. Polypropylene is what I use most.

                  Jerry

                  http://www.Backpack GearTest. org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
                  reviews and tests on the planet.

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:hammockcamping@ yahoogroups.
                  com] On Behalf Of Arye P. R.
                  Sent: Friday, October 16, 2009 6:48 AM
                  To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                  Stretch is relative to multiple factors - the material, the weave, the
                  length under load, and the strength (load capacity) of the rope/strap being
                  used. All these factors determine the amount of stretch a user will get.
                  Also how a material is treated by the manufacturer in manufacturing and how
                  a material is treated by the end user in use.

                  "poly" says nothing Used here it is a consumer abbreviation for a group of
                  materials plastics rope fabric... Be specific, polyester or polypropylene.
                  All have materials by end use manufacturer have different characteristics -
                  abrasion, stretch, chemical, UV, resistance to name a few.

                  SapereAude,

                  Arye P. Rubenstein

                  Imagination is more important than knowledge...
                  It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education... Albert Einstein

                  ____________ _________ _________ __
                  From: Jerry Goller <jerrygoller@ backpackgeartest .org>
                  To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 4:17:02 PM
                  Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                  They must have been nylon, then. Poly doesn't, for all practical purposes,
                  stretch.

                  Jerry

                  http://www.Backpack GearTest. org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
                  reviews and tests on the planet.

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:hammockcamping@ yahoogroups.
                  com] On Behalf Of Tom Frazier
                  Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 3:08 PM
                  To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                  I use the 1" wide climbing straps (got mine at REI) along with a
                  cinch-buckle for the straps and I sewed a loop at the end of the cord and
                  attached a climbing-rated carabiner for a quick-connect/ quick-release set
                  up. I don't get any stretch either. I did when I used the old poly cords
                  that came with my older claytor hammock...those stretched like undersized
                  socks on a giant!

                  Tom

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Jerry Goller
                  To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:36 AM
                  Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                  I have to admit, I'm mildly mystified by this thread. What straps and cord
                  material are you all using? I'm not getting *that* much sag on my hammock
                  when I get in it.

                  Jerry

                  http://www.Backpack GearTest. org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
                  reviews and tests on the planet.

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                  [mailto:hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of lpon2000
                  Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:46 AM
                  To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: assist in hanging higher on the tree

                  The further apart the trees are, the higher you have to get the suspension
                  on the trees. I use the point of a trekking pole to lift and raise the
                  straps on the trunk of the tree. An extensible trekking pole is useful as a
                  porch strut for the tarp as well. The straps are generally loose enough on
                  the trunk when there is no weight in the hammock. I have also used trees
                  with a lot of small branches - put the tip of the pole in the biner or loop
                  and shove it through high branches.

                  Lori

                  --- In hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com, "David" <delliott78@ ...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I have recently revisited Dave Womble's excellent files on the forces
                  > on
                  hammock suspensions and ridgelines here:
                  >
                  > http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/hammockcam ping/files/ Youngblood%
                  > 27s/
                  >
                  > I like to hang my dog's hammock under mine, so I tighten the support
                  ropes
                  to raise my hammock and make room for his. This greatly increases the forces
                  on the support ropes and structural ridgeline. (Both hammocks hang from the
                  same points at the ends of the ridgeline.) Add in the extra 70 lb.
                  that the dog weighs for more force. Then consider the occasional need to use
                  trees that are farther apart. My 7/64" amsteel support ropes are cut to
                  handle tree-to-tree separations of up to 25 ft., but I've only been able to
                  use that use that a couple of times, and the tension is scary. (I usually
                  try to do this across a hollow, so I have the benefit of extra height, hence
                  more sag. My question is this: has anyone devised a method of attaching tree
                  huggers higher, possibly using hiking poles or forked sticks? I'd like to be
                  able to easily place my tree huggers about two or three feet higher than I
                  can reach (and retrieve them easily the next morning). I use a hammock
                  because about 25 years ago I lost my ability to sleep soundly on roots and
                  rocks. Somewhere along the way my enthusiasm for shinnying up trees with a
                  strap in my mouth went away, too.
                  >

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