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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Hammock for Brazil and South America

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  • Tom Frazier
    Otto: Rodney pretty much hit nearly all the points in his response, but I ll fill in a few blanks and give you my opinion since this was actually my first
    Message 1 of 59 , May 8, 2009
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      Otto:


      Rodney pretty much hit nearly all the points in his response, but I'll fill in a few blanks and give you my opinion since this was actually my first hammock (now I just make my own!). I'm actually planning on a family hammock camping trip and I've loaned my Claytor Jungle Hammock to my father...this will be his first hammock camping experience, so I do have the utmost confidence in the Jungle Hammock!

      As far as pricing and affordability, you really can't go wrong with the Claytor Jungle Hammock. I can't buy the materials to make the set up he sells for less than what he sells his product at retail---so it is a really good price for what it is. What originally sold me was the fact that you can spread the netting out so you don't feel so closed in and the netting stays off your face!

      As Rodney suggest, I'd probably email Tom Claytor about getting the Jungle Hammock with the larger square tarp he sells for better coverage. You *will* have to waterproof the diamond tarp that comes with the Jungle Hammock set up and you can use the same products you use to waterproof your tent....now, I'm not talking about sealing the seams (the way the diamond tarp is made, there is no top seam that you have to seal anyways!), you have to actually waterproof the entire tarp before you plan on using it. It is made of nylon taffetta, so it's a little on the heavy side, but really isn't that bad, actually.

      The diamond fly has good coverage from rain pouring straight down, but if you have any wind or any rain coming at any angle you run the risk of getting wet and cold. There is a way to prevent that from happening with the diamond fly, of course, and that is to lower the bottom ends of the tarp all the way down so that it sandwiches you in the hammock---but that also means you don't have any wiggle room and no room to cook under the tarp while it's raining. Personally, I like being as comfortable as possible, so if you're going to get this model of hammock, I'd get the larger square tarp he sells with the hammock instead of the diamond tarp. You'll be more flexible this way, and his tarps are still green, so they won't be an eyesore in the jungle!

      As to the width of the hammock and laying straight---I've had no problems sleeping in whatever position I want. It's very comfortable and the liner on the inside of the hammock feels nice against the skin, but also helps wick away any moisture that may build up inside. The only issue with the width is that you need to play with how it hangs more than you would with a wider hammock. Most of the wider hammocks you can have more sag, so they look more like a banana shape when no one's in it, but because this hammock is not as wide, you may find you'll need to set it up with less of a sag to lay flatter in it, but I've had no problems with it and I have yet to read any bad reviews of the hammock. The only shortcomings I've noticed I already posted in this thread.

      There is one more thing, though, but it's a matter of preference. The cords that come with the hammock are a little on the heavy side and they *will* stretch if you tie the hammock up too far between trees...I've got a picture my wife took of me sleeping in my jungle hammock after the straps stretched overnight...I ended up waking up barely an inch off the ground the next morning! This was only a problem because I went as far as I could go between to two far apart from each other. I later upgraded my suspension system to include one inch wide webbing (you can buy that from Ed Speer for really cheap...around $8.50 USD www.speerhammocks.com ) and a cinch buckle. I *love* this suspension set up; it's much faster to set up and easier to adjust; but the suspension system is something that you can upgrade at a later time. If you're just looking for an affordable set up I don't think you can go wrong with the jungle hammock you're looking at--just be aware of the limitations of the tarp!! If you upgrade the tarp, then that would eliminate that particular [in my opinion] weak point.

      Good luck!!


      Tom




      ----- Original Message -----
      From: proteorio
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, May 08, 2009 3:18 PM
      Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Hammock for Brazil and South America





      Hi Tom
      Nice to meet you and thanks for the answer.
      I was impressed by the Mosquito Hammock, the Jungle model. Look's like to have many good features: is double layer and accept a camping pad, can lay on the ground if no trees are available, has camouflage color that is very good for stealth camping, and in Brazil is better not to be seen, the price is good and he send for free worldwide.
      Two things are my concern:
      1- the width of the hammock only 4' (cm. 300x125) and is written "comfortable for a person up to 7' 5" and 350 pounds". This wide it's enough for side sleeping?
      2 - Why the tarp is so bad ? - it is possible to waterproof with silicon or same of the stuff used for tents sealing ? The JRB Cat Tarp is $ 105 and the Speer Winter Tarp is $ 119. Alones are costing like the hammock( not counting the shipping) and this option is not . I have to stick to the tarp who cams long wit the Jungle.
      Do you know of some major drawback of the Jungle model ?
      I'm really interested in this model.
      otto

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Frazier" <wildewudu@...> wrote:
      >
      > Claytors have double bottoms too: www.mosquitohammock.com so you can shove a pad in them as well. The fly for this hammock would need to be water proofed though, or replace it with another tarp like the Hammock Hut www.jacksrbetter.com or the Speer Winter Tarp www.speerhammocks.com
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Otto Mateus
      > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2009 12:25 PM
      > Subject: [Hammock Camping] Hammock for Brazil and South America
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi Liz,
      > Nice to meet you and thanks for the answer.
      > I visited all sites you mentioned in the message. There are all very interesting and are very good places to learn new ideas and tricks. Me too I have a home workshop where I can make o modify many of the things I need.
      > Looks a little tricky all this hand work especially on a brand new (and expensive) hammock .A double layer hammock sound more interesting and rational.. I can stick my Therm-a-rest Ultralight pad underneath. But at the moment neither Clark (pockets can be considered double layer?) or Hennessy offer a full double layer .I will try to visit more sites in the Internet
      > I never though about sleeping diagonally. The hammock I made I was keeping very taught with two yacht pulleys. It was like sleeping on a bed. But everything was heavy and I did get cold.
      > I will do others tests on a local made cotton hammock
      > Thanks for the wishes I hope to find the right one very soon.
      > Otto
      >
      > Veja quais são os assuntos do momento no Yahoo! +Buscados
      > http://br.maisbuscados.yahoo.com
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Sandy Kramer
      Hi, Otto....hmmmm you went with the Claytor Jungle Hammock....I m really liking the Warbonnet Blackbird (hope I have name right). I was thinking of y all last
      Message 59 of 59 , Jun 4 12:44 PM
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        Hi, Otto....hmmmm you went with the Claytor Jungle Hammock....I'm really liking the Warbonnet Blackbird (hope I have name right).

        I was thinking of y'all last week as I was hanging on the rooftop terrace (mirador) of my little house in Mexico (Lake Chapala area; south of Guadalajara; central highlands).

        It's a hand woven (nylon) traditional style Venezuelan hammock - in a bright yellow. I thought I'd take advantage of the nice weather for a chance to get a good night's sleep (I have arthritis) and managed to stay there til ab 3 a.m. but there were quite a few mosquitos.

        Sooooo, I'm now seriously looking at buying a mosquito net...over the two links I posted earlier I'm thinking of ordering the ENO one because it has a ridgeline (as opposed to the other that has 4 tie-outs). I have a Treklight double, so I can use the net with that one as well.

        Otto, I lived mostly in Caracas...and yes, I like to kayak and have several. I only do recreational paddling - in South Florida we do river kayak camping trips.

        I bought the Hennessy Hammock Hex Tarp (ab. $60)...and later I got the white one from Sportsmansguide ($30 http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/guide-gear-tarp.aspx?a=254694). No way should you have to buy a new tarp and then waterproof it!!

        The HH one has neat little pockets that close with velcro (I think) to stuff the guy lines inside.

        sandy


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "proteorio" <proteorio@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Sandy,
        > Nice to meet you. Sorry for the delay in replying I have just been a bit busy
        > Thanks for the useful links. I went trough the ENO site and the hammocks seem as good as the Hammocks Bliss ones for separate items. Here in Brazil there is a similar model from Kampa (www.kampa.com.br). I don't' know the quality but the price is more o less the same , minus the shipping. I still thinking about the Tom Claytor hammock. To waterproof a tarp is not a big job especially using silicon spray. For the rest I still prefer the Jungle for the many feature , the price and the free shipping. I continue to find out more about this hammock.
        > In which place of Venezuela you grow up? If I'm not indiscreet why your e-mail address is sandykayak? Anything with kayak? Excuse me for the many questions
        > Otto
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Sandy Kramer" <sandykayak@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Here's another one....only $40, but it appears that you will need several trees as it has four tie-outs...good for spreading the netting open, but not sure how to attach. Perhaps someone else has used one of these?
        > >
        > > In addition to my Byer's of Maine Moskito Traveller, I have a Treklight double that doesn't have any mesh, so I'm interested.
        > >
        > > any comments on comparing this one with the ENO one I posted before?
        > >
        > > which one would you buy?
        > >
        > > http://www.joessports.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1472652&CAWELAID=103771021
        > >
        > > sandy in miami
        > >
        > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Sandy Kramer" <sandykayak@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Otto, this is the separate mosquito netting option I was talking about. It's not very easy to see/understand in their photo, but at the bottom right there are diagrams.
        > > >
        > > > These are a good addition to a regular hammock that doesn't come with netting....or one that has regular netting and not no see'um mesh.
        > > >
        > > > http://www.eaglesnestoutfittersinc.com/guardian-bug-net.html
        > > >
        > > > sandy in miami
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Sandy Kramer" <sandykayak@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Hi, Otto...there is a huge difference in the netting...there are teeny flying insects called "no see'ums" (because they are so small you can hardly see them), also called gnats, that can make your life perfectly miserable if you only have regular mosquito netting.
        > > > >
        > > > > One gal was almost eaten alive in south florida...the gnats went through the mesh of her tent. And I had the same problem in the netting of my canvas popup camper.
        > > > >
        > > > > you definitely need no see 'um mesh. Also, darker netting is easier to see out of.
        > > > >
        > > > > you have a point about the mosquitos biting through the fabric...one of the sites (can't remember which, right now) sells a separate mosquito (need to see if it's no see 'um mesh) that is like a huge bag and the hammock is suspended in between. i'll see if i can find the URL.
        > > > >
        > > > > sandy in miami, fl who grew up in Venezuela.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
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