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Re: Best Rain fly/tarp to use for lightweight backpacking with hammo

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  • boardmanmw
    I know its not the lightest option, but I use 3 ft shock cords to string my fly. You can buy 1/8in cord from Ace Hardware, along with small brass end hooks,
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 10, 2009
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      I know its not the lightest option, but I use 3 ft shock cords to string my fly. You can buy 1/8in cord from Ace Hardware, along with small brass end hooks, and make your own. They're far lighter and more compact than the standard 1/4 inch bungees; my entire standard bundle of 9 separate cords weighs 4.8oz. I'm willing to sacrifice the weight and use these for two reasons: (1) they hook on anything--limbs, roots, stakes, trekking pole, etc. They're amazingly quick, easy and versatile to set up, and at the end of the day (sometimes in the dark), there's no knot tying or fumbling around. My fly goes up quick and taut. (2) The inherent stretch really protects the fly and its tieouts in gusty winds. Last summer up in the Quetico my fly stood up to 40 knot winds one day(till I moved to a more sheltered site) with absolutely no damage, which I attribute to the give in the shock cords.

      You get the same protection from using shock cord loops or tensioners, but you still have to tie out and tension the lines. Not so using straight shock cords.

      I agree on the hazard of tensioned cords flying loose, but you can mitigate that with some care in what you hook them to. It's never been a problem for me.

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Troy and Ronda" <gilmem2@...> wrote:
      >
      > An alternate simple tensioner method - use 12-24 inches of shockcord (the longer is easier to attach, but a little heavier.)
      >
      > Attach to line near the tarp using a prussic knot. This knot eats about 4-8 inches of the shockcord per knot, depending on how tight you get it.
      >
      > Attach to line a little closer to end of line using prussic knot.
      >
      > Both knots should be tied tightly.
      >
      > Adjust by sliding the second knot (the one towards the end of the line) closer to the end of the line, transferring the tension from the main line to the shock cord, and creating a loop of slack in the main line. Tighten at stake or tree end by moving stake or using taut line hitch at that end, until the shock cord is stretched to about 1/2 tension.
      >
      > Like other methods, this means the shock cord needs only to be adjusted once, but it can be adjusted if desired. In very strong winds, the prussic knots will slip just before breaking, as the knot stretches (unlike prussic knots tied with cordlettes for climbing). Then the full strength of the main guy line is available. With no tight knots or bends in the main line, it retains most of its strength. If the shock cord breaks, it does not shoot off anything, you just get a little slack in the line. However, it will only break under frozen conditions, due to slippage. Under high wind, it only stretches until slack in the main line is gone, then that line holds.
      >
      > It is particulary nice on hammock side tie outs like the Hennessy hammocks use. Allows nice give when you get in, sways gently for a moment, then quickly damps out. The same thing happens when you toss and turn - a little give, short sway which dampens out.
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Rosaleen Sullivan
      Hey, Friends- Just a comment about using shock cords. Without debating their usefulness in specific situations, please be aware that shock cords, as several
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 11, 2009
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        Hey, Friends-



        Just a comment about using shock cords. Without debating their usefulness in specific situations, please be aware that shock cords, as several other materials, are subject to break-down from agents such as DEET. Rubberized materials seem to be especially susceptible. When applying DEET, try to wash it off of your hands before handling gear, or use your wrists to spread bug repellant. This will also help prevent getting DEET into your eyes, should you wipe them, or into food you subsequently might eat.



        HYOH,



        Rosaleen





        Re: Best Rain fly/tarp to use for lightweight backpacking with hammo
        Posted by: "boardmanmw" boardmanm@... boardmanmw
        Date: Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:45 am ((PDT))

        I know its not the lightest option, but I use 3 ft shock cords to string my fly. You can buy 1/8in cord from Ace Hardware,


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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