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Re: Best Rain fly/tarp to use for lightweight backpacking with hammock

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  • lpon2000
    The tarps you are looking at are heavy, as you say, and the ENO rainfly is not what it s cracked up to be - doesn t give you good coverage from rain,
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 8 6:02 AM
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      The tarps you are looking at are heavy, as you say, and the ENO rainfly is not what it's cracked up to be - doesn't give you good coverage from rain, particularly if it's windy. You'd be better off with the JRB 8x8 (http://sectionhiker.com/2008/05/20/jacks-r-better-silnylon-tarp/) for a little more. Also, REI is selling old stock, ENO started making that out of sil.

      If you want to compare silnylon and PU, open up some of the tents - rain flies on some of the newer tents are silnylon. Some people use the Kelty Noah, which I've seen on the shelf at REI - also PU instead of sil, heavy, but lighter than the huge PU or plastic tarps because it's tapered. Can't cook under it but it works. Another option might be a poncho that's made to double as a tarp, if you have a shorter hammock.

      Good luck with whatever you get. I have no experience with PU - the thought of stuffing that heavy tarp in my pack with rain all over it sent me looking for tarps that fit in the side pockets of my Nimbus. Some things I pinch pennies, shelter is not one of them. I console myself that my ultra-comfy hammock setup is drier and more comfortable than tents that cost twice as much.

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Brett" <dirtbikenguy2@...> wrote:
      >
      > REI sells Polyurethane-treated ripstop nylon rainfly called the ENO DryFly Rainfly. it sells for 79.99. how is this material different from the silnylon i have heard people rave about. is one better than the other and why? i definately will not spend more than 50 bucks for a rainfly... even that seems excessive when you can get along with a 9 dollar blue tarp ( even if it is heavier and bulkier) does anyone have a good suggestion for a good rainfly.. and no i don't think i'm going to attempt to make this one item.. even if i am up for making my own gear 90% of the time.
      >
    • lpon2000
      ... there are two cheaper and lighter ways of making tarp tensioners. One is to use a length of shock cord - can be tied in a loop and tied into the main
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 8 10:12 AM
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Vickers <redroach@...> wrote:
        >
        > Jacks R Better also makes self tensioning guy lines using cord and
        > surgical tubing. They are great for windy conditions where you need
        > some give in the tarp/guylines
        >
        > TV
        >

        there are two cheaper and lighter ways of making tarp tensioners. One is to use a length of shock cord - can be tied in a loop and tied into the main guyline in such a way that if the taught loop happens to break, the guy line merely lengthens hopefully without breaking itself. Another is to use rubber O rings from the plumbing aisle between the tie out point on the tarp and the line.

        Both ideas are from the wise guys at hammockforums.net. I found the instructions for the shock cord tensioners there.

        Lori
      • Elizabeth Young
        ... http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=3731 I just added these to my new tarp and they are so absurdly simple that I giggled the entire time.
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 8 9:34 PM
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          lpon2000 wrote:

          > there are two cheaper and lighter ways of making tarp tensioners. One
          > is to use a length of shock cord from the wise guys at
          > hammockforums.net.

          http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=3731

          I just added these to my new tarp and they are so absurdly simple that I
          giggled the entire time.

          liz young
        • lpon2000
          ... Polyurethane is a coating and will eventually peel off. Silnylon is nylon impregnated with silicone and won t peel. Silnylon does stretch/sag a little,
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 9 5:45 AM
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            > In both cases the basic material (nylon) has had a coating applied to
            > it. The ENO fly is coated with polyurethane and the silnyl flys have
            > been treated with silicone. Polyurethane is a heavier (more weight to
            > carry) coating than silicone coated.
            > Anything that has seams (in either material) will need seamsealing to
            > prevent the stitching lines from leaking.
            > I like silnyl better because it is lighter. However, it can be a little
            > more fragile than other materials. It is also noisier unless pitched taut.
            >

            Polyurethane is a coating and will eventually peel off. Silnylon is nylon impregnated with silicone and won't peel.

            Silnylon does stretch/sag a little, which is why people are talking about tarp tensioners. For the ultimate lightweight tarp without sag, spinnaker would be the thing - no need for tarp tensioners, lighter than silnyl.

            I'll stick with sil - lasts longer than PU, lighter by a magnitude, packs smaller than small, and under the conditions I camp in, it works fine to keep the rain off. Under some circumstances water can mist through it, but I haven't run into fine mist yet and likely won't.
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