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Re: [Hammock Camping] Best Rain fly/tarp to use for lightweight backpacking with hammock

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  • Arye P. R.
    try ebay some Supplex Nylon WPB DWR 60 wide for $1.25 yard 6 yards should be more than enough and much less than
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 7 4:34 PM
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      try ebay <http://stores.ebay.com/Cloth-Plus-Fabrics> some Supplex Nylon WPB DWR 60" wide for $1.25 yard 6 yards should be more than enough and much less than 50.00 and if you negotiate for lower shipping you should be less than 25.00 for a ruffly 9x10ft b4 hemming.

      Sapere Aude,

      Arye P. Rubenstein


      Imagination is more important than knowledge...
      It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education... Albert Einstein




      ________________________________
      From: Brett <dirtbikenguy2@...>
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, April 7, 2009 5:14:05 PM
      Subject: [Hammock Camping] Best Rain fly/tarp to use for lightweight backpacking with hammock





      REI sells Polyurethane- treated ripstop nylon rainfly called the ENO DryFly Rainfly. it sells for 79.99. how is this material different from the silnylon i have heard people rave about. is one better than the other and why? i definately will not spend more than 50 bucks for a rainfly... even that seems excessive when you can get along with a 9 dollar blue tarp ( even if it is heavier and bulkier) does anyone have a good suggestion for a good rainfly.. and no i don't think i'm going to attempt to make this one item.. even if i am up for making my own gear 90% of the time.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tom Frazier
      The blue tarps can still sweat though! I like the silnylon tarps myself. Their water/wind proofness and weight are more than worth the cost to me. I ve used
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 7 8:12 PM
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        The blue tarps can still sweat though! I like the silnylon tarps myself. Their water/wind proofness and weight are more than worth the cost to me. I've used the blue tarps (they do fine, but they wear out easier too) and the nylon taffetta (heavy and needs constant DWR coating) tarps....buy your silnylon from www.speerhammocks.com and sew one up yourself!!

        T3



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Brett
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, April 07, 2009 3:14 PM
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Best Rain fly/tarp to use for lightweight backpacking with hammock





        REI sells Polyurethane-treated ripstop nylon rainfly called the ENO DryFly Rainfly. it sells for 79.99. how is this material different from the silnylon i have heard people rave about. is one better than the other and why? i definately will not spend more than 50 bucks for a rainfly... even that seems excessive when you can get along with a 9 dollar blue tarp ( even if it is heavier and bulkier) does anyone have a good suggestion for a good rainfly.. and no i don't think i'm going to attempt to make this one item.. even if i am up for making my own gear 90% of the time.





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • lpon2000
        The tarps you are looking at are heavy, as you say, and the ENO rainfly is not what it s cracked up to be - doesn t give you good coverage from rain,
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 8 6:02 AM
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          The tarps you are looking at are heavy, as you say, and the ENO rainfly is not what it's cracked up to be - doesn't give you good coverage from rain, particularly if it's windy. You'd be better off with the JRB 8x8 (http://sectionhiker.com/2008/05/20/jacks-r-better-silnylon-tarp/) for a little more. Also, REI is selling old stock, ENO started making that out of sil.

          If you want to compare silnylon and PU, open up some of the tents - rain flies on some of the newer tents are silnylon. Some people use the Kelty Noah, which I've seen on the shelf at REI - also PU instead of sil, heavy, but lighter than the huge PU or plastic tarps because it's tapered. Can't cook under it but it works. Another option might be a poncho that's made to double as a tarp, if you have a shorter hammock.

          Good luck with whatever you get. I have no experience with PU - the thought of stuffing that heavy tarp in my pack with rain all over it sent me looking for tarps that fit in the side pockets of my Nimbus. Some things I pinch pennies, shelter is not one of them. I console myself that my ultra-comfy hammock setup is drier and more comfortable than tents that cost twice as much.

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Brett" <dirtbikenguy2@...> wrote:
          >
          > REI sells Polyurethane-treated ripstop nylon rainfly called the ENO DryFly Rainfly. it sells for 79.99. how is this material different from the silnylon i have heard people rave about. is one better than the other and why? i definately will not spend more than 50 bucks for a rainfly... even that seems excessive when you can get along with a 9 dollar blue tarp ( even if it is heavier and bulkier) does anyone have a good suggestion for a good rainfly.. and no i don't think i'm going to attempt to make this one item.. even if i am up for making my own gear 90% of the time.
          >
        • Bill Keiser
          sportsman s guide makes a 12 x 12 lightweight catenary tarp for about $30. it isn t treated as far as i can tell.
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 8 6:03 AM
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            sportsman's guide makes a 12 x 12 lightweight catenary tarp for about $30. it isn't treated as far as i can tell.
            <http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=254694>
            i see they claim it is coated with "1,000 mm polyurethane water coating" but i don't detect any coating on mine except at the seams.
            it is not quite the quality of my larger kelty tarp, but it doesn't have the good name behind it. (kelty repaired my ripped tarp for free). it is plain nylon fabric, not ripstop or treated, but if set up properly, the rain or dew should run off to the edges.
            it weighs in at 1lb 12oz.
            personally i don't buy from them any more. their (mostly) china made gear is inferior. sometimes it just isn't worth it to buy the cheapest product!
            bill keiser

            "Brett" <dirtbikenguy2@...> wrote:
            >
            > REI sells Polyurethane-treated ripstop nylon rainfly called the ENO DryFly Rainfly. it sells for 79.99.
          • Thomas Vickers
            Jacks R Better sells a 11 x 10 cat tarp. Not sure of the price, but from my use, it is GREAT tv
            Message 5 of 12 , Apr 8 6:28 AM
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              Jacks R Better sells a 11 x 10 cat tarp. Not sure of the price, but
              from my use, it is GREAT

              tv
            • Lenny Nichols
              ... Jacks R Better makes great products. I haven t tried one of their tarps, but I have several of their other products. You might also want to check out
              Message 6 of 12 , Apr 8 9:54 AM
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                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Vickers <redroach@...> wrote:
                >
                > Jacks R Better sells a 11 x 10 cat tarp. Not sure of the price, but
                > from my use, it is GREAT
                >
                > tv
                >

                Jacks R Better makes great products. I haven't tried one of their tarps, but I have several of their other products.

                You might also want to check out MacCat tarps. I do have one of those, and it works out great.

                LeNi
              • Thomas Vickers
                Jacks R Better also makes self tensioning guy lines using cord and surgical tubing. They are great for windy conditions where you need some give in the
                Message 7 of 12 , Apr 8 10:00 AM
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                  Jacks R Better also makes self tensioning guy lines using cord and
                  surgical tubing. They are great for windy conditions where you need
                  some give in the tarp/guylines

                  TV
                • lpon2000
                  ... there are two cheaper and lighter ways of making tarp tensioners. One is to use a length of shock cord - can be tied in a loop and tied into the main
                  Message 8 of 12 , Apr 8 10:12 AM
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                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Vickers <redroach@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Jacks R Better also makes self tensioning guy lines using cord and
                    > surgical tubing. They are great for windy conditions where you need
                    > some give in the tarp/guylines
                    >
                    > TV
                    >

                    there are two cheaper and lighter ways of making tarp tensioners. One is to use a length of shock cord - can be tied in a loop and tied into the main guyline in such a way that if the taught loop happens to break, the guy line merely lengthens hopefully without breaking itself. Another is to use rubber O rings from the plumbing aisle between the tie out point on the tarp and the line.

                    Both ideas are from the wise guys at hammockforums.net. I found the instructions for the shock cord tensioners there.

                    Lori
                  • Elizabeth Young
                    ... In both cases the basic material (nylon) has had a coating applied to it. The ENO fly is coated with polyurethane and the silnyl flys have been treated
                    Message 9 of 12 , Apr 8 10:52 AM
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                      Brett wrote:
                      > REI sells Polyurethane-treated ripstop nylon rainfly called the ENO
                      > DryFly Rainfly. it sells for 79.99. how is this material different
                      > from the silnylon i have heard people rave about. is one better than
                      > the other and why?
                      In both cases the basic material (nylon) has had a coating applied to
                      it. The ENO fly is coated with polyurethane and the silnyl flys have
                      been treated with silicone. Polyurethane is a heavier (more weight to
                      carry) coating than silicone coated.
                      Anything that has seams (in either material) will need seamsealing to
                      prevent the stitching lines from leaking.
                      I like silnyl better because it is lighter. However, it can be a little
                      more fragile than other materials. It is also noisier unless pitched taut.

                      > i definately will not spend more than 50 bucks for
                      > a rainfly...
                      Extreme sales or second hand stuff will come in at that price point. If
                      you keep your eyes open you might find a fly for that price.

                      > even that seems excessive when you can get along with a
                      > 9 dollar blue tarp ( even if it is heavier and bulkier)
                      Don't knock your blue tarp - if it works for you and you are happy with
                      it, why change?
                      My first camping tarp was a polyurethane coated nylon one. It was just a
                      little too small for a hammock but it was a nice fly.
                      Now I have jumped on the silnyl bandwagon.

                      > does anyone
                      > have a good suggestion for a good rainfly.. and no i don't think i'm
                      > going to attempt to make this one item.. even if i am up for making
                      > my own gear 90% of the time.
                      Leaving aside price issues, there are rectangular/square flys and flys
                      with fancier shapes (like the ENO you mentioned in your post). Your blue
                      tarp (unless you've gone at it with scissors) is the first kind.
                      My understanding of the logic behind the shaped fly is that there are
                      parts your hammock you need to have covered (like the ends) but you
                      really only need the minimum coverage there. One reason for making the
                      sides of the fly curved is that, since your hammock is suspended, you
                      don't need a tarp to come all the way to the ground (unless you want it
                      to, like for winter camping or horrible weather). The curved sides mean
                      that you have adequate coverage and don't have to carry excess fabric
                      around. Curves tend to reduce flapping (noise) as well.
                      I have just bought a MacCat tarp (silnyl) from OES. It is the first
                      curved-edged tarp I've had and I am eager to try it out. I'll be camping
                      tomorrow night (probably in the rain) and will let you know what I think
                      of it. My previous fly was an Extremely Ugly homemade silnyl rectangle,
                      destined for a date with a pair of scissors and transformation into
                      other gear.

                      liz young in rainy northern california
                    • Elizabeth Young
                      ... http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=3731 I just added these to my new tarp and they are so absurdly simple that I giggled the entire time.
                      Message 10 of 12 , Apr 8 9:34 PM
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                        lpon2000 wrote:

                        > there are two cheaper and lighter ways of making tarp tensioners. One
                        > is to use a length of shock cord from the wise guys at
                        > hammockforums.net.

                        http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=3731

                        I just added these to my new tarp and they are so absurdly simple that I
                        giggled the entire time.

                        liz young
                      • lpon2000
                        ... Polyurethane is a coating and will eventually peel off. Silnylon is nylon impregnated with silicone and won t peel. Silnylon does stretch/sag a little,
                        Message 11 of 12 , Apr 9 5:45 AM
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                          > In both cases the basic material (nylon) has had a coating applied to
                          > it. The ENO fly is coated with polyurethane and the silnyl flys have
                          > been treated with silicone. Polyurethane is a heavier (more weight to
                          > carry) coating than silicone coated.
                          > Anything that has seams (in either material) will need seamsealing to
                          > prevent the stitching lines from leaking.
                          > I like silnyl better because it is lighter. However, it can be a little
                          > more fragile than other materials. It is also noisier unless pitched taut.
                          >

                          Polyurethane is a coating and will eventually peel off. Silnylon is nylon impregnated with silicone and won't peel.

                          Silnylon does stretch/sag a little, which is why people are talking about tarp tensioners. For the ultimate lightweight tarp without sag, spinnaker would be the thing - no need for tarp tensioners, lighter than silnyl.

                          I'll stick with sil - lasts longer than PU, lighter by a magnitude, packs smaller than small, and under the conditions I camp in, it works fine to keep the rain off. Under some circumstances water can mist through it, but I haven't run into fine mist yet and likely won't.
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