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Tall guy looking to get into a hammock

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  • carrbear123
    Hi folks, I ve been checking out the forum to find previous posts on these questions, but haven t had luck. If it s been discussed before, please feel free to
    Message 1 of 20 , Jan 30, 2009
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      Hi folks,

      I've been checking out the forum to find previous posts on these
      questions, but haven't had luck. If it's been discussed before,
      please feel free to send me to the right place! Otherwise, I guess
      I'll just ask 'em all! :)


      I'm 6'3'', 225lbs; thinking about getting into a hammock for the
      first time. A buddy of mine is interested too (similar size), but is
      fearful of his lower back pain acting up in a hammock.

      So:

      1) Hammocks that advertise that 6'5'' and under will "fit"...will I,
      really, fit?

      2) How 'flat' can you really get in one (even at a diagonal)? Every
      pic I've seen of people lying 'flat' don't really look too flat - the
      middle of the body looks to sag down a good bit.

      2) Hennessy vs DD? Thoughts? Any other suggestions for an entry level
      hammock?

      3) Know of any stores that I could test a hammock in, without
      actually buying one first? (What if I really don't like it!?)

      4) Know of any outlets for used equipment, low prices? Or should I
      just stick with a new one from a dealer?


      Hope someone can give some good insight. Perhaps you'll gain another
      hammocking camper or two out of it! (Ha!) Thanks a bunch.

      -Brian
    • David Ball, RiverJourneys, Inc.
      I am 6 2 and 250 and have slept in a Claytor more often than not since last March. I have been very comfortable. My back has improved dramatically and the
      Message 2 of 20 , Jan 31, 2009
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        I am 6'2" and 250 and have slept in a Claytor more often than not since last March. I have been very comfortable. My back has improved dramatically and the whole flat thing for me was overplayed. Part of what I have enjoyed is having my feet, after a tough day on the water or at work, above my head. Instant relief! There are a zillion options out there. It might pay to try to find someone close by that has a couple of hammocks you could try.

        There are folks here with a lot more knowledge than me, however; I can tell you that even with just my beginning set up, I am comfortable, sleep better than ever, and I will never go back to the ground. I even pass on my waterbed when it isn't -23 outside as I so enjoy my hammock. If it is above single digits, most nights I am hanging outside. Explore, read, search, read, talk to folks, read. I guess you get the reading thing huh!

        Here is a link to Claytor: http://www.mosquitohammock.com/

        There are lots of options, also check out: http://hammockforums.net

        I have gotten lots of good information there.

        That's about all I know. ;)

        David

        David and Cara Lawson-Ball
        RiverJourneys Inc.


        `Nice? It's the only thing,' said the Water Rat solemnly, as he leant forward for his stroke. `Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing -- absolute nothing -- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats. Simply messing,' he went on dreamily: `messing -- about -- in -- boats; messing -- --

        Wind in the Willows

        574-535-3623
        http://www.riverjourneys.org
        riverjourneys@...

        Dedicated to providing our customers personal growth,
        team building, and leadership development through outdoor adventure.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tod Massa
        I m 6 4ish, typically around 270lbs. My son is 6 8 and 180lbs or so. We both have ENO hammocks. Never a problem size-wise. I only use my ENO in the warm
        Message 3 of 20 , Jan 31, 2009
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          I'm 6'4ish, typically around 270lbs. My son is 6'8" and 180lbs or so. We both have ENO hammocks. Never a problem size-wise. I only use my ENO in the warm weather and I have a winter hammock I made myself.

          One of the keys to successful hammocking is sufficient experimentation on hanging to figure out what works best for you.

          Making your own hammock is relatively easy, especially Risk's zHammock model (use google). That's what I used with walmart $1 yard ripstop. Gives you the advantage of making it as long as you want.


          Tod

          ______________________________________________________________________________
          My wife told me to pick her or the banjo. IMTM TIMT.....




          ________________________________
          From: carrbear123 <carrbear01@...>
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, January 31, 2009 12:45:05 AM
          Subject: [Hammock Camping] Tall guy looking to get into a hammock


          Hi folks,

          I've been checking out the forum to find previous posts on these
          questions, but haven't had luck. If it's been discussed before,
          please feel free to send me to the right place! Otherwise, I guess
          I'll just ask 'em all! :)

          I'm 6'3'', 225lbs; thinking about getting into a hammock for the
          first time. A buddy of mine is interested too (similar size), but is
          fearful of his lower back pain acting up in a hammock.

          So:

          1) Hammocks that advertise that 6'5'' and under will "fit"...will I,
          really, fit?

          2) How 'flat' can you really get in one (even at a diagonal)? Every
          pic I've seen of people lying 'flat' don't really look too flat - the
          middle of the body looks to sag down a good bit.

          2) Hennessy vs DD? Thoughts? Any other suggestions for an entry level
          hammock?

          3) Know of any stores that I could test a hammock in, without
          actually buying one first? (What if I really don't like it!?)

          4) Know of any outlets for used equipment, low prices? Or should I
          just stick with a new one from a dealer?

          Hope someone can give some good insight. Perhaps you'll gain another
          hammocking camper or two out of it! (Ha!) Thanks a bunch.

          -Brian



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • pure mahem
          I do highly recomend hanging vs. the ground. But if your worried about trying it and being out your money if you don t like it don t be. There have been a few
          Message 4 of 20 , Jan 31, 2009
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            I do highly recomend hanging vs. the ground. But if your worried about trying it and being out your money if you don't like it don't be. There have been a few that have experimented and then decided it wasn't for them, they then inturn had no trouble selling what they bought on hammock forums.net or White Blaze. A good source to try before your buy is to post on hammock forums.net and see if anyone is in your area and will let you try there hammock out. Many hangers are very gratious at trying to convert the ground dwellers. I've had a lot of trouble with my back in recent years and the hammock in my opinion is the most comfortable night sleep I can get. Most people I've read about having problems is usually that there knees bother them from the slight curve and that is usually taken care of by stuffing some extra clothing or backback under the legs while sleeping. If you explore the forums READING you'll see this issue comes up quite a bit for many
            people along with shoulder squeeze in some cases. I personally have never had an issue with these and am perfectly comfortable in my Treklight hammock.




            ________________________________
            From: carrbear123 <carrbear01@...>
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, January 31, 2009 12:45:05 AM
            Subject: [Hammock Camping] Tall guy looking to get into a hammock


            Hi folks,

            I've been checking out the forum to find previous posts on these
            questions, but haven't had luck. If it's been discussed before,
            please feel free to send me to the right place! Otherwise, I guess
            I'll just ask 'em all! :)

            I'm 6'3'', 225lbs; thinking about getting into a hammock for the
            first time. A buddy of mine is interested too (similar size), but is
            fearful of his lower back pain acting up in a hammock.

            So:

            1) Hammocks that advertise that 6'5'' and under will "fit"...will I,
            really, fit?

            2) How 'flat' can you really get in one (even at a diagonal)? Every
            pic I've seen of people lying 'flat' don't really look too flat - the
            middle of the body looks to sag down a good bit.

            2) Hennessy vs DD? Thoughts? Any other suggestions for an entry level
            hammock?

            3) Know of any stores that I could test a hammock in, without
            actually buying one first? (What if I really don't like it!?)

            4) Know of any outlets for used equipment, low prices? Or should I
            just stick with a new one from a dealer?

            Hope someone can give some good insight. Perhaps you'll gain another
            hammocking camper or two out of it! (Ha!) Thanks a bunch.

            -Brian






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • shokulan
            I have a 30% dislocation between my L5 and sacrum. This was the result of a motorbike accident. Before that, though, I was really sway backed from scoliosis.
            Message 5 of 20 , Jan 31, 2009
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              I have a 30% dislocation between my L5 and sacrum. This was the
              result of a motorbike accident. Before that, though, I was really
              sway backed from scoliosis. So when I had the accident, the break was
              at the weakest point of my sway.

              Even before my accident, I had trouble sleeping on a bed--needing a
              pillow under my knees to help straighten out my back and relieve
              pressure from my lower back. After the accident, everything was much
              worse.

              I also have TMJ and all the associated jaw, head, neck, and shoulder
              discomfort.

              Before hammocks, I was spending more and more money on fancier and
              thicker sleeping mats and increasingly complicated arrangements with
              pillows under my knees and supporting my head. None of it was doing
              any good as I continued to spend most of the night in such discomfort
              that I wasn't getting much sleep. Lack of sleep does a real number on
              hiking energy and attitude!

              The great thing about hammocks is--no pressure points. Sleeping
              supported by cloth, the result is a fairly even support throughout.
              There are no pressure points. There are, however, two or three stress
              points: neck, knees, and maybe ankles. I use a bath towel (at home)
              or my down vest or sweater (when hiking) as a pillow--a full pillow is
              just too much pillow. I slide around in the hammock until there's a
              wrinkle of cloth to support my knees, crossing your legs, or tucking
              one foot under the other knees, or learning to make sure you've always
              some bend in your knees prevents the stress and discomfort of hyper
              extension. Some people on this list stuff their extra clothes under
              their knees. Sometimes, an ankle (usually my right ankle) is a bit
              stiff or uncomfortable in the morning, because I spent the night with
              it twisted an odd way.

              Despite these drawbacks, hammocks are so comfortable and I was getting
              such good sleep in them, that I moved in permanently about 1.5 years
              ago. I sleep in a modified version of the US$19-25 Traveler hammock
              at home. I bought a US$25 folding hammock stand (from Target, but
              it's slightly too small even for my short height of 5'3") for use when
              staying in hotels or visiting relatives (places where it would be
              inconvenient to sleep outside). On the trail, I use a Hennessey
              (hennesseyhammock.com). It's lightness and compactness offsets my
              personal preferences for top-loading hammocks and for sleeping angled
              head right and feet left (Hennessey's Asym design basically forces you
              to sleep head left and feet right of the center line). Another
              advantage of the Hennessey bottom-entry design is that I don't dump my
              sleeping bag and 'pillow' into the muck when I leave the hammock.

              Admittedly, since I almost always hike with my husband, the most
              lightweight way for me to go would be to ditch the hammock and share
              the Double Rainbow (tarptent.com) with my husband. This would make
              our combined pack weight lighter by about 1 kilo (2 lbs). So,
              carrying a hammock does have a weight penalty--especially any time the
              nighttime temperatures go below 70*F (for me, below 80*F). For me,
              the weight penalty (since my husband carries the tent) is definitely
              worth the nights rest!

              Anyway, if you have back problems, a hammock just might be the way to
              go. My chiropractor thinks it a terrible idea, but he's never seen
              one in use and has the typical mental image of a banana. Sleeping on
              the diagonal or in a way similar to sleeping in a lazy-boy recliner is
              very different from sleeping in a banana shape. My doctor (general
              practitioner) is interested and is eager to see the hammock.

              CL
            • Rosaleen Sullivan
              Hi, Brian- You have several great answers already. Hung and used correctly, yes, you will get pretty flat but not totally flat in a hammock. And, yes, the
              Message 6 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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                Hi, Brian-

                You have several great answers already. Hung and used correctly, yes, you will get pretty flat but not totally flat in a hammock. And, yes, the way the fabric fans out around and under you, you will be supported so well that being "flat" is not actually desirable.

                I've been using Hennessy Hammocks for about 10 years. I was leery of the hammock concept due to a couple of blown out discs, arthritis, etc. I like that the bottom-entry closes behind me, sealing off the hammock from bugs, etc. A little practice takes care of working around getting into the hammock with sleeping bag, etc.

                If you are near Boston, I can lend you a Hennessy Explorer Deluxe, which might fit you. Also, Hennessy has a return policy. Check it out at hennessyhammock.com. Other vendors may also have a trial policy.

                Regards,

                Rosaleen


                Tall guy looking to get into a hammock
                Posted by: "carrbear123" carrbear01@...<mailto:carrbear01@...> carrbear123
                Date: Sat Jan 31, 2009 2:11 pm ((PST))

                Hi folks,

                I've been checking out the forum to find previous posts on these
                questions, but haven't had luck. If it's been discussed before,
                please feel free to send me to the right place! Otherwise, I guess
                I'll just ask 'em all! :)



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • gary coleman
                i think your description of sleeping in a lazy-boy is very accurate.  i was talking to someone at work and he liked the idea of camping/hiking, but said he
                Message 7 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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                  i think your description of sleeping in a lazy-boy is very accurate.  i was talking to someone at work and he liked the idea of camping/hiking, but said he didn't think he could figure out a way  haul around his cpap machine that he has to use at night.  i aske him if he  ever falls asleep and has problems in a recliner.  he said no.  i suggested a hammock might be the solution.  he looked at me with glazed eyes and you could see he didn't understand that a hammock is something other than the banana position.

                  --- On Sun, 2/1/09, shokulan <caralinb@...> wrote:

                  From: shokulan <caralinb@...>
                  Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Tall guy looking to get into a hammock
                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Sunday, February 1, 2009, 2:35 AM





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • shokulan
                  A hammock is much better than a lazyboy! At home, I ll often start the night in lazyboy, waking up in the morning on the diagonal. Lazyboy is easy to do in
                  Message 8 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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                    A hammock is much better than a lazyboy! At home, I'll often start
                    the night in lazyboy, waking up in the morning on the diagonal.

                    Lazyboy is easy to do in any Mayan style hammock, but hard in
                    Hennessey's ASYM hammocks (but not impossible...). I first read the
                    description in Shane Steinkemp's Backpackgeartest review of a
                    Hennessey Hammock (no longer online, unfortunately reviews expire
                    after about 3 years).

                    To do the lazyboy, you want your torso (from butt to head) in line
                    with the hammock. Then, instead of keeping your legs together and
                    going banana, let your legs split and slide down away from the center
                    line. The result is each leg gets cradled by the extra hammock
                    material. If you get it right, you'll even have knee support.

                    I use neck support (towel), but one of those inflatable travel pillows
                    will work. This keeps your head from flopping over. I'll rest my
                    arms above my head (when hot), or down alongside my torso, or crossed
                    over my chest--all depends on how cold I am.

                    Many in my family have sleep apnea and use cpap machines. One uncle
                    pointed out that the more upright (lazyboy) or more face sideways or
                    down (sleep on side or tummy) you can get, the better you'll sleep
                    without the machine.

                    CL

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, gary coleman <gacoleman@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > i think your description of sleeping in a lazy-boy is very
                    accurate.  i was talking to someone at work and he liked the idea of
                    camping/hiking, but said he didn't think he could figure out a way 
                    haul around his cpap machine that he has to use at night.  i aske him
                    if he  ever falls asleep and has problems in a recliner.  he said no. 
                    i suggested a hammock might be the solution.  he looked at me with
                    glazed eyes and you could see he didn't understand that a hammock is
                    something other than the banana position.
                  • C C Wayah
                    Rosaleen, ... In my HH I have difficulty with my feet working out of the bottom entry slit during the night. Do you or Tom have any solution for this as I
                    Message 9 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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                      Rosaleen,
                      >I like that the bottom-entry closes behind me, sealing off the hammock from
                      >bugs, etc.

                      In my HH I have difficulty with my feet working out of the bottom entry slit
                      during the night. Do you or Tom have any solution for this as I don't want
                      skeeters inside with me when the hole closing gets compromised. My feet are
                      in a sleeping bag so they are protected form the skeeters but the hole ends
                      up partially open. I have a touch of restless leg syndrome that most hikers
                      don't have that causes the feet to escape. Do you or anyone else know of
                      any solutions for this?

                      Rogene






                      .
                    • ratsmouth@aol.com
                      Okay, now I am really looking forward to using my HH for the first time this spring. When I had orbital decompression surgery, followed by gallbladder
                      Message 10 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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                        Okay, now I am really looking forward to using my HH for the first time
                        this spring. When I had orbital decompression surgery, followed by
                        gallbladder surgery, in the fall, I had to use my recliner to sleep in
                        for a few weeks and found it really comfortable. So if sleeping in my
                        hammock is anything like that, I am going to sleep like a baby!

                        I'm 5'8", 240 lb., and have a Safari Deluxe, which may be "too much
                        hammock" for my size, but when I unpacked it to add snake skins, it
                        seemed pretty workable. My 60+ year old camping buddies are excited
                        about the hammock, so maybe I'll be able to charge admission to try it
                        out! :::grin:::

                        One of the best things about turning 60 last year was seeing the looks
                        on people's faces when I mention that I camp and kayak with a bunch of
                        other 60+ year old ladies. My philosophy is that I'm not 60, I'm
                        5x12, five times over, and still playing in the woods. With this
                        hammock, I may have extended the number of years I can continue to
                        enjoy exploring the outdoors.

                        Ratty


                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: gary coleman <gacoleman@...>
                        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Sun, 1 Feb 2009 9:31 am
                        Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Tall guy looking to get into a
                        hammock

                        i think your description of sleeping in a lazy-boy is very
                        accurate.  i was talking to someone at work and he liked the idea
                        of
                        camping/hiking, but said he didn't think he could figure out a way 
                        haul around his cpap machine that he has to use at night.  i aske him
                        if he  ever falls asleep and has problems in a recliner.  he said no. 
                        i suggested a hammock might be the solution.  he looked at me with
                        glazed eyes and you could see he didn't understand that a hammock is
                        something other than the banana position.



                        --- On Sun, 2/1/09, shokulan <caralinb@...> wrote:



                        From: shokulan <caralinb@...>

                        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Tall guy looking to get into a hammock

                        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

                        Date: Sunday, February 1, 2009, 2:35 AM



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • paddydrury
                        I have 3 DD hammocks ( well one is for my daughter) and can not recomend them highly enough. A DD plus light tarp is nowhere near as pricey as a Hennessey.
                        Message 11 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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                          I have 3 DD hammocks ( well one is for my daughter) and can not
                          recomend them highly enough. A DD plus light tarp is nowhere near as
                          pricey as a Hennessey. Plus for me I like to enter and leave via the
                          side.

                          If you do not wish to make use of the attached mosey net just hang the
                          dd upside down !!!

                          There are a number of videos on dd's web site and a few others on Utube
                        • Tom Frazier
                          Haha...banana position...don t you hate it when that s the first thing everyone thinks? I m still getting my father used to the idea of hammock camping. He s
                          Message 12 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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                            Haha...banana position...don't you hate it when that's the first thing everyone thinks? I'm still getting my father used to the idea of hammock camping. He's going to try it this summer to see if he likes it (he may even go to a JRB bridge hammock, too as it might fit his style more)---doesn't help that he has memory issues...so I go through all the advantages, and some disadvantages, get him psyched and convinced to try it out but then when I mention it again he forgets all about what we discussed previously and get this mental banana image in his head again! Seriously, *why* would anyone say hammocks are even marginally comfortable if the only position you can take is that of a banana!




                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: gary coleman
                            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Sunday, February 01, 2009 6:31 AM
                            Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Tall guy looking to get into a hammock


                            i think your description of sleeping in a lazy-boy is very accurate. i was talking to someone at work and he liked the idea of camping/hiking, but said he didn't think he could figure out a way haul around his cpap machine that he has to use at night. i aske him if he ever falls asleep and has problems in a recliner. he said no. i suggested a hammock might be the solution. he looked at me with glazed eyes and you could see he didn't understand that a hammock is something other than the banana position.

                            --- On Sun, 2/1/09, shokulan <caralinb@...> wrote:

                            From: shokulan <caralinb@...>
                            Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Tall guy looking to get into a hammock
                            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Sunday, February 1, 2009, 2:35 AM

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Elizabeth Young
                            ... hey, if you are anywhere near Sacramento, CA you could always borrow my very plain generic hammock - it is super wide so it is pretty easy to get flattish
                            Message 13 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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                              carrbear123 wrote:
                              > 3) Know of any stores that I could test a hammock in, without
                              > actually buying one first? (What if I really don't like it!?)

                              hey, if you are anywhere near Sacramento, CA you could always borrow my
                              very plain generic hammock - it is super wide so it is pretty easy to
                              get flattish on the diagonal.
                              Took me a while to believe that hanging the hammock loose and droopy
                              actually lets you lie flatter then if it is all stretched out tight.
                              This applies to simple end-gathered hammocks anyway.

                              liz
                            • David Fox
                              There is a relatively lightweight battery at CPAP.COM that will run many cpap machines for three nights. Tell your friend to try that AND the hammock. From:
                              Message 14 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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                                There is a relatively lightweight battery at CPAP.COM that will run many
                                cpap machines for three nights. Tell your friend to try that AND the
                                hammock.



                                From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
                                On Behalf Of gary coleman
                                Sent: Sunday, February 01, 2009 8:31 AM
                                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Tall guy looking to get into a hammock



                                i think your description of sleeping in a lazy-boy is very accurate. i was
                                talking to someone at work and he liked the idea of camping/hiking, but said
                                he didn't think he could figure out a way haul around his cpap machine that
                                he has to use at night. i aske him if he ever falls asleep and has
                                problems in a recliner. he said no. i suggested a hammock might be the
                                solution. he looked at me with glazed eyes and you could see he didn't
                                understand that a hammock is something other than the banana position.

                                --- On Sun, 2/1/09, shokulan <caralinb@...
                                <mailto:caralinb%40ms68.hinet.net> > wrote:

                                From: shokulan <caralinb@... <mailto:caralinb%40ms68.hinet.net> >
                                Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Tall guy looking to get into a hammock
                                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <mailto:hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>

                                Date: Sunday, February 1, 2009, 2:35 AM

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • David Fox
                                Tall Guy, If you are near Dallas Texas contact me. I have several different hammocks you can try. From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                Message 15 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Tall Guy,

                                  If you are near Dallas Texas contact me. I have several different hammocks
                                  you can try.



                                  From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
                                  On Behalf Of Elizabeth Young
                                  Sent: Sunday, February 01, 2009 12:56 PM
                                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Tall guy looking to get into a hammock



                                  carrbear123 wrote:
                                  > 3) Know of any stores that I could test a hammock in, without
                                  > actually buying one first? (What if I really don't like it!?)

                                  hey, if you are anywhere near Sacramento, CA you could always borrow my
                                  very plain generic hammock - it is super wide so it is pretty easy to
                                  get flattish on the diagonal.
                                  Took me a while to believe that hanging the hammock loose and droopy
                                  actually lets you lie flatter then if it is all stretched out tight.
                                  This applies to simple end-gathered hammocks anyway.

                                  liz





                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • shokulan
                                  It s not just the first thing everyone thinks, it s the first thing everyone does! It takes a while before they trust the hammock enough to relax. ... thing
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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                                    It's not just the first thing everyone thinks, it's the first thing
                                    everyone does! It takes a while before they trust the hammock enough
                                    to relax.

                                    -- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Frazier" <wildewudu@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Haha...banana position...don't you hate it when that's the first
                                    thing everyone thinks?
                                  • Carey Parks
                                    Hmm.. I don t know what to say about that. Since the HH is asym, you should be sleeping with your feet on the right side of the slit, and your head on the
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Feb 2, 2009
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                                      Hmm.. I don't know what to say about that. Since the HH is asym, you should
                                      be sleeping with your feet on the right side of the slit, and your head on
                                      the opposite side, sort of side-saddle. The slit originally had no velcro
                                      even, it just stays shut. The velcro is mainly to keep the slit closed when
                                      you are not in it.

                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                      [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of C C Wayah
                                      Sent: Sunday, February 01, 2009 10:33 AM
                                      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Tall guy looking to get into a hammock



                                      Rosaleen,
                                      >I like that the bottom-entry closes behind me, sealing off the hammock
                                      from
                                      >bugs, etc.

                                      In my HH I have difficulty with my feet working out of the bottom entry
                                      slit
                                      during the night. Do you or Tom have any solution for this as I don't want
                                      skeeters inside with me when the hole closing gets compromised. My feet
                                      are
                                      in a sleeping bag so they are protected form the skeeters but the hole
                                      ends
                                      up partially open. I have a touch of restless leg syndrome that most
                                      hikers
                                      don't have that causes the feet to escape. Do you or anyone else know of
                                      any solutions for this?

                                      Rogene

                                      .






                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Carey Parks
                                      what s a DD? ... From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of paddydrury Sent: Sunday, February 01, 2009 10:36 AM
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Feb 2, 2009
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        what's a DD?


                                        -----Original Message-----
                                        From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                        [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of paddydrury
                                        Sent: Sunday, February 01, 2009 10:36 AM
                                        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Tall guy looking to get into a hammock


                                        I have 3 DD hammocks ( well one is for my daughter) and can not
                                        recomend them highly enough. A DD plus light tarp is nowhere near as
                                        pricey as a Hennessey. Plus for me I like to enter and leave via the
                                        side.

                                        If you do not wish to make use of the attached mosey net just hang the
                                        dd upside down !!!

                                        There are a number of videos on dd's web site and a few others on Utube






                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • David Fox
                                        www.ddhammocks.com They have a double layer bottom hammock which is more resistant to mosquitoes biting through. You can place a sleeping pad between the
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Feb 2, 2009
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                                          www.ddhammocks.com



                                          They have a double layer bottom hammock which is more resistant to
                                          mosquitoes biting through. You can place a sleeping pad between the layers
                                          and this will give you better insulation in cold temps without the pad
                                          sliding all over the place. Also a fine mosquito net and several pouches
                                          inside to hold glasses, flashlight, etc. They are in England. I have
                                          ordered and received one of their hammocks but not had a chance to use it
                                          yet.



                                          From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
                                          On Behalf Of Carey Parks
                                          Sent: Monday, February 02, 2009 12:36 PM
                                          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Tall guy looking to get into a hammock



                                          what's a DD?

                                          -----Original Message-----
                                          From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                          <mailto:hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>
                                          [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                          <mailto:hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com> ]On Behalf Of paddydrury
                                          Sent: Sunday, February 01, 2009 10:36 AM
                                          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <mailto:hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>

                                          Subject: [Hammock Camping] Tall guy looking to get into a hammock

                                          I have 3 DD hammocks ( well one is for my daughter) and can not
                                          recomend them highly enough. A DD plus light tarp is nowhere near as
                                          pricey as a Hennessey. Plus for me I like to enter and leave via the
                                          side.

                                          If you do not wish to make use of the attached mosey net just hang the
                                          dd upside down !!!

                                          There are a number of videos on dd's web site and a few others on Utube

                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • Tom Frazier
                                          Many folks swear by a hammock (properly used, of course) to relieve back pain. My father has had multiple back surgeries and issues with slipped disks so I m
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Feb 2, 2009
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            Many folks swear by a hammock (properly used, of course) to relieve back pain. My father has had multiple back surgeries and issues with slipped disks so I'm trying to get him into a hammock and off the ground so he can see how comfy it is. One huge advantage is that you don't have to crawl off the ground in the morning, you just swing your legs around and sit up, exactly like you would with a bed. The hammock is supposed to be especially kind on your back and body due to the elimination of pressure points (no springs, no rocks, just the hammock material and two tie ups and full body support).

                                            I've got the Claytor Jungle Hammock myself and I love it, but do wish it would be a little wider (so I made three hammocks myself! It can get addicting ;o). The hammock is nine feet long and I personally like it pitched a little tighter than I would, say, and ENO hammock--which is a bit wider than my Claytor JH.

                                            Laying flat...in a way it just really doesn't matter how flat you are, because your back isn't flat, it has a natural curve to it when you're sitting/standing/laying properly with good support. I've been really, really close to being perfectly flat in my hammock[s], but it's not "perfect" in the sense that it feels like laying on a board. There's some give and you can't help that. However, there is a hammock style that claims that you can lay so flat in it you need a pillow: the bridge hammock.

                                            Here's a bridge hammock by Jacks R Better: http://www.jacksrbetter.com/BMBH.htm It's really different from your "standard" hammock.

                                            As to the Hennessey....it's really not my flavor. I love the top entry hammocks--much easier to deal with in typical camping situations and no hurdles to overcome in order to enjoy my hammock camping experience. The bottom entry--that's the only thing that has ever held be back from getting a Hennessey hammock! I really don't see the point of it and it looks like it'd just be a really P.I.T.A. to use and get comfy in (y'know...get your bag in there, a sleeping pad or whatever else you need).

                                            The DD hammock (http://www.ddhammocks.com/products.php) is nearly the exact same thing as the Claytor (http://www.mosquitohammock.com/junglehammock.html); so if I were to choose between the HH and the DD I'd definitely go with the DD. Entry level hammock? Speer has a good reputation and I like the idea of being able to completely remove the hammock netting and go totally topless when wanted (http://www.speerhammocks.com/) and the ENO hammock isn't far behind: http://www.eaglesnestoutfittersinc.com/ I don't like ENO's tarps, though. I'd get Speer's winter tarp, the McCat, the JRB hammock hut or something similar; but that's just me.

                                            As to stores you can test the hammocks in. Not many stores, that I know of, actually sell good camping hammocks. Sportsman's Warehouse has some hammocks but they are, in my heavily biased opinion, are either crap, or won't suit your height. The best place I can think of is REI (http://www.rei.com) as they carry both the Hennessey (if you swing that way) and the ENO hammock systems. REI is really good about letting you try stuff out in the store, they even have a rental center so you may be able to just rent a hammock, or two, and try them out in the field before you buy. They are also the only store I know of that as a 100% Guarantee. If you don't like it just bring it back to the store for a full refund, no questions ever asked. So even if you got, say, an ENO and you tried it but then decided that it's not for you and you can't make it work for you, you can just bring it back and get your money back.

                                            Lastly, you can go to your local fabric store (I find my stuff at Joann's Fabrics) and get yourself four yards (so you have room to play with) of 1.9 oz. ripstop nylon in the color of your choice. Gather the ends and tie them with a strong piece of cordage then tie on a length of rope to each side and hang your hammock up. Experiment with how you lay in the hammock until you get comfy. This would be a rather large hammock, though, at 5 feet wide, and would give you plenty of wiggle room. You could hem the edges to make it last longer and if you didn't want to do much, if any sewing, you could just get the ENO netting and cover the hammock when needed.

                                            Hope this helps a little. A great resource is http://www.hammockforums.net; most of what I learned when I started I got from this site. If you haven't already, you should check it out! Lots of pics and info. to keep you entertained and informed.




                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                            From: carrbear123
                                            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                            Sent: Friday, January 30, 2009 9:45 PM
                                            Subject: [Hammock Camping] Tall guy looking to get into a hammock


                                            Hi folks,

                                            I've been checking out the forum to find previous posts on these
                                            questions, but haven't had luck. If it's been discussed before,
                                            please feel free to send me to the right place! Otherwise, I guess
                                            I'll just ask 'em all! :)

                                            I'm 6'3'', 225lbs; thinking about getting into a hammock for the
                                            first time. A buddy of mine is interested too (similar size), but is
                                            fearful of his lower back pain acting up in a hammock.

                                            So:

                                            1) Hammocks that advertise that 6'5'' and under will "fit"...will I,
                                            really, fit?

                                            2) How 'flat' can you really get in one (even at a diagonal)? Every
                                            pic I've seen of people lying 'flat' don't really look too flat - the
                                            middle of the body looks to sag down a good bit.

                                            2) Hennessy vs DD? Thoughts? Any other suggestions for an entry level
                                            hammock?

                                            3) Know of any stores that I could test a hammock in, without
                                            actually buying one first? (What if I really don't like it!?)

                                            4) Know of any outlets for used equipment, low prices? Or should I
                                            just stick with a new one from a dealer?

                                            Hope someone can give some good insight. Perhaps you'll gain another
                                            hammocking camper or two out of it! (Ha!) Thanks a bunch.

                                            -Brian





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