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Re: [Hammock Camping] rope tie

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  • Tom Frazier
    Would be okay if you didn t mind the rope cutting into the trees. One could use a short length of webbing around the tree (tree-hugger?) and carabiner it to
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 29, 2009
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      Would be okay if you didn't mind the rope cutting into the trees. One could use a short length of webbing around the tree (tree-hugger?) and carabiner it to the rope system.




      ----- Original Message -----
      From: C C Wayah
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2009 7:48 PM
      Subject: [Hammock Camping] rope tie


      Video of a new rope tie system for hammock.
      What do you folks think of this?
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFHEQOqX7vQ&feature=related

      Actual product sight
      http://www.samplerewards.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&product_id=2077&ProReview_ID=110

      Rogene

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • C C Wayah
      Hennesy Hammocks have the tree huggers with rope. The question is are they strong enough for the forces of a hammock. My husband is not so sure about the
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 30, 2009
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        Hennesy Hammocks have the tree huggers with rope.
        The question is are they strong enough for the forces of a hammock.
        My husband is not so sure about the weight limits.

        Actual product sight
        >
        > http://www.samplerewards.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&product_id=2077&ProReview

        Rogene
      • lpon2000
        Those rope tensioners have been discussed at hammock forums. I don t bother with those or the Niteize figure 9 s on hammock suspension - sounds like an
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 30, 2009
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          Those rope tensioners have been discussed at hammock forums. I don't
          bother with those or the Niteize figure 9's on hammock suspension -
          sounds like an invitation to slippage. I've tried Niteize on the tarp
          suspension and don't like them; a knot's easier for me.

          People retrofit rope hammocks with polypro straps to avoid damaging
          trees and getting hammocks banned. I wouldn't put the spectra around a
          tree directly, or any other rope; I've already had rangers eyeball the
          hammock with suspicion. I can explain the straps won't damage the
          tree, especially if I've spent a night in it already and can show
          them. No way to excuse rope.

          I got some extra long straps for my Hennessy from Strapworks, to fit
          around the pines and oaks in California. No failures so far, with them
          or the Hennessy stock straps. I think Tom Hennessy would not have
          stuck with straps for so long if they did not work; the weight limits
          on the hammocks are for the actual material of the hammock, you'll
          notice, but the straps stay the same even on the models for heavier folk.

          Go ask your question at hammock forums - maybe someone there has had
          strap failure that wasn't related to cheap straps or sloppy knot
          tying, but I can't find a post about that. There are questions about
          hammocks for heavyweights as well, if you are curious about what sort
          of forces a hammock can take. The only strap failures I've seen in the
          forum were related to cheap Walmart straps or to knot failure. Even
          the not-recommended nylon straps only stretch, not break.

          Lori

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "C C Wayah" <ccwayah@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hennesy Hammocks have the tree huggers with rope.
          > The question is are they strong enough for the forces of a hammock.
          > My husband is not so sure about the weight limits.
          >
          > Actual product sight
          > >
          > >
          http://www.samplerewards.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&product_id=2077&ProReview
          >
          > Rogene
          >
        • C C Wayah
          Sorry after reading your reply I didn t mean to ask about treehugger failure.I was asking about the tension device load weights for tying up a hammock. I have
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 30, 2009
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            Sorry after reading your reply I didn't mean to ask about treehugger
            failure.I was asking about the tension device load weights for tying up a
            hammock. I have arthritis in my hands that makes it hard to untie my
            hammock knots at times.
            Rogene
          • Ralph Oborn
            ... It usually doesn t take a lot of dexterity? Ralph [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 30, 2009
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              On Fri, Jan 30, 2009 at 7:34 AM, C C Wayah <ccwayah@...> wrote:

              > Sorry after reading your reply I didn't mean to ask about treehugger
              > failure.I was asking about the tension device load weights for tying up a
              > hammock. I have arthritis in my hands that makes it hard to untie my
              > hammock knots at times.
              > RogeneAre you using the hammock hangers tree wrap?
              >

              It usually doesn't take a lot of dexterity?


              Ralph


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • pure mahem
              If arthritis is a concern I ld go with a strap: Carabiner on one end so all you have to do is wrap aroune the tree and clip back upon the strap: double
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 30, 2009
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                If arthritis is a concern I'ld go with a strap: Carabiner on one end so all you have to do is wrap aroune the tree and clip back upon the strap: double accending rings on the other end atached to the hammockrope with a larks head/cow hitch. Think Motorcycle helmet buckle on a larger scale. you can also use the cinch buckle instead if you have enough dexterity to adjust back and forth that's a personal choice. If your worried about slipage a simple slipped half hitch or 2 would definately secure the tag end left over after you've adjusted the double accending ring. This has been discussed in depth on hammockforums.net along with many, many, many more ways to hang. Just do a search or ask they are really freindly and helpful there to help a hanger or even a prospect. Not the rude atmosphere that you find on the sister site WhiteBlaze. JMO!




                ________________________________
                From: C C Wayah <ccwayah@...>
                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, January 30, 2009 9:34:55 AM
                Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: rope tie


                Sorry after reading your reply I didn't mean to ask about treehugger
                failure.I was asking about the tension device load weights for tying up a
                hammock. I have arthritis in my hands that makes it hard to untie my
                hammock knots at times.
                Rogene






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • pure mahem
                I think I may set the record for the Heaviest Heavy weight hiker @ 450lbs. And I can say it will hold you, have no fear! However all gear does eventually break
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 30, 2009
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                  I think I may set the record for the Heaviest Heavy weight hiker @ 450lbs. And I can say it will hold you, have no fear! However all gear does eventually break down over time and the long haulers can testify you will eventually land on your but at some point. Even climber replace there gear do to the same reason. Just because your gear is rated what it is new doesn't mean it will stay that way forever. Your best bet is to inspect your straps, hammock and hardware on a regular basis. If it's not raining I inspect my gear before every hang. Pay special attenttion to stitching and key wear points such as wear each item conects to one another like hammock to rope, rope to rings, rings to straps, strap to biner, all knot points and loadbearing stitches. A good point to mention is that knots do weaken your rope/strap by a percentage some more than others. A simple overhand knot can decrease a rope/straps rating by 50% not all knots are as severe but just to
                  keep you in the loop so to speak as knowledge is power. That's why most use webing that has sewn loops in the end to attach their biner instead of a knot. They did do testing on this and discussed this on hammock forums.net sometime last year and the stitched loop was the winner for strength as long as it was stitched properly not cutting any of the webbing when it was stitched and the proper stitch used I believe the best stitch pattern for strength was a double box with an x going through both boxes. Hope this helps!




                  ________________________________
                  From: lpon2000 <lorister@...>
                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Friday, January 30, 2009 8:36:34 AM
                  Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: rope tie



                  Those rope tensioners have been discussed at hammock forums. I don't
                  bother with those or the Niteize figure 9's on hammock suspension -
                  sounds like an invitation to slippage. I've tried Niteize on the tarp
                  suspension and don't like them; a knot's easier for me.

                  People retrofit rope hammocks with polypro straps to avoid damaging
                  trees and getting hammocks banned. I wouldn't put the spectra around a
                  tree directly, or any other rope; I've already had rangers eyeball the
                  hammock with suspicion. I can explain the straps won't damage the
                  tree, especially if I've spent a night in it already and can show
                  them. No way to excuse rope.

                  I got some extra long straps for my Hennessy from Strapworks, to fit
                  around the pines and oaks in California. No failures so far, with them
                  or the Hennessy stock straps. I think Tom Hennessy would not have
                  stuck with straps for so long if they did not work; the weight limits
                  on the hammocks are for the actual material of the hammock, you'll
                  notice, but the straps stay the same even on the models for heavier folk.

                  Go ask your question at hammock forums - maybe someone there has had
                  strap failure that wasn't related to cheap straps or sloppy knot
                  tying, but I can't find a post about that. There are questions about
                  hammocks for heavyweights as well, if you are curious about what sort
                  of forces a hammock can take. The only strap failures I've seen in the
                  forum were related to cheap Walmart straps or to knot failure. Even
                  the not-recommended nylon straps only stretch, not break.

                  Lori

                  --- In hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com, "C C Wayah" <ccwayah@... > wrote:
                  >
                  > Hennesy Hammocks have the tree huggers with rope.
                  > The question is are they strong enough for the forces of a hammock.
                  > My husband is not so sure about the weight limits.
                  >
                  > Actual product sight
                  > >
                  > >
                  http://www.samplere wards.com/ index.cfm? fuseaction= product.display& product_id= 2077&ProReview
                  >
                  > Rogene
                  >






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • lpon2000
                  ... up a ... What knot are you using? I have always just used the Hennessy figure 8 to set up the hammock - three over and under and arounds, and tie a half
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 31, 2009
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                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "C C Wayah" <ccwayah@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Sorry after reading your reply I didn't mean to ask about treehugger
                    > failure.I was asking about the tension device load weights for tying
                    up a
                    > hammock. I have arthritis in my hands that makes it hard to untie my
                    > hammock knots at times.
                    > Rogene
                    >

                    What knot are you using? I have always just used the Hennessy figure 8
                    to set up the hammock - three over and under and arounds, and tie a
                    half hitch. One tug to undo the half hitch, unwrap the rope, and done.
                    I have been using a climbing biner (four bucks on sale somewhere, max
                    load of 500# per biner) in the strap loops then wrapping the rope on
                    the biner. I've been nervous the first few times but never gone butt
                    to ground. I even use the figure 8 on the tarp - haven't been in a
                    real storm with it but it's kept it taught so far.

                    You might be asking the wrong question. Maybe the real question is,
                    does anyone have suggestions for suspension for dexterity challenged
                    hands. Moving to straps from ropes might be the trick. Slap straps are
                    nylon - you can get polypro or polyester straps from speer
                    (http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/Supplies.htm) and rewhip your
                    hammock ends with them. (Or have someone else do the whipping for you,
                    if you can't get it tight enough.) Nylon, like the slap straps, will
                    keep stretching; polypro will stretch some and stop, and polyester
                    tends not to stretch.

                    Lori
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