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Re: [Hammock Camping] The crazy junk you can use

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  • Dave Womble
    ... That is a big problem for me too. I generally wake up and lay around waiting for daylight for several hours. When it is seriously cold, it is too cold
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 11, 2009
      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "m2b1997" <m2b1997@...> wrote:

      > When it comes to winter hiking, just how do you guys manage to sleep
      > for 15 hours? I know it's a crazy question. It's the one thing that
      > bugs me though.

      That is a big problem for me too. I generally wake up and lay around
      'waiting for daylight' for several hours. When it is seriously cold,
      it is too cold for me to mess around trying to do much of anything.

      There are a lot of things about winter backpacking like that, you have
      to really enjoy it or really want to do it. Water freezes, you freeze
      if you aren't careful, your boots/shoes freeze, not much daylight for
      hiking, etc. I think you have to mentally approach the long nights as
      just another challenge. The colder it gets, the more you have to pay
      attention to what you do because of the consequences of mistakes.
    • Cara Lin Bridgman
      Could it be that the socks inside the vapor barrier were too thick and the ones outside the vapor barrier were too thin? In other words, how damp were the
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 11, 2009
        Could it be that the socks inside the vapor barrier were too thick and
        the ones outside the vapor barrier were too thin? In other words, how
        damp were the socks inside the vapor barrier when you removed them? All
        your other inside layers were quite thin and the outside ones varied in
        thickness. All sock layers were reasonably loose, right?

        CL

        Dave Womble wrote:
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "m2b1997" <m2b1997@...> wrote:
        >> 1. Why did the feet fail when I was doing the same exact thing to the
        >> feet that I did to the rest of the body??? This really has me
        >> stumped.
        >>
        >
        > That is perplexing to me. I often just use vapor barriers on my feet
        > and they have always helped with me. My guess would be that maybe you
        > flexed your feet enough when you removed them to improve circulation?
        > But I can't figure why you were warmer when you removed them if
        > everything was working as it should.
        >
        > Dave
      • m2b1997
        Dave, I agree on the perplexing part. It doesn t seem like their should have been any difference. I still can t figure out any kind of logical, or illogical
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 11, 2009
          Dave,

          I agree on the perplexing part. It doesn't seem like their should
          have been any difference. I still can't figure out any kind of
          logical, or illogical reason for why things went the way they did.

          Cara,

          Both layers of socks were the same make. They were a thermal work
          sock. Hence why I thought about and went out and bought a pair of
          nylon socks yesterday to give them a try as the under VB layer and
          see if that would change things around. I'm not sure how wicking
          nylon is versus maybe being more VB sided. Anyone care to take a
          stab at it, I am curious. I guess I'm too use to hanging around hot
          air balloons and always feeling ripstop nylon which is designed
          essentially as a VB.

          The socks were dry as far as I know when I removed the VB. I didn't
          really think to feel but since they had only been on a little over
          and hour and my feet had been in a cold environment the whole time
          that should have pretty much kept any kind of moisture to a bare
          minimum/unnoticible.

          I remember someone talking about the hand situation/comparison.
          Normally it seems like I sleep in one of three or four ways.
          Occasionally I sleep with my hands laying right next to the body,
          especially more so when I'm sleeping indoor/warm temps. If I'm
          laying on my side I normally raise both hands up and use them as
          a 'pillow' under the ear that facing down. Otherwise I can find
          myself with my arms crossed, quite often I have noticed this outside
          this past week. I'll have the arms crossed with the hands tucked
          inside, hence the ability of the hands to stay warm that way. The
          other method I have caught myself doing is to cross the hands and put
          them in the center of my chest. This wouldn't help to keep them
          warm. It seems like outside I have noticed a split between the hands
          crossed and placed on the chest and having the arms crossed and the
          hands laying by the opposite ribcage.

          How do you guy manage to keep batteries from dying on you almost
          instantly when winter hiking? LOL!!! I have had such bad luck
          recently, granted with a cell phone, keeping the batteries charged
          it's unbelievable. I was working shoveling snow all day today and
          the boss called. I had only had the phone turned on for about two
          hours since I last recharged it. By the time the two minute
          conversation was over the darn thing was already beeping at me
          telling me the battery was low. I kept the phone on the rest of the
          day, another 4 hours or so. When I got home the battery was showing
          fully charged. Then again it had been in my pocket the whole time
          other than when I pulleed it out to talk to the boss.

          I could see the mp3 player but reading would be difficult as the
          tendency to want to stay as much in the sleeping bag as possible to
          stay warm would make reading rather unpleasant I would think. I'm
          going to have to try that tonight here in the house and see what I
          think. That could be an option since I do have a wind up light that
          requires no batteries. Anymore I think I would use the wind up light
          versus using a Petzel headlamp. It may weigh slightly more but I
          don't have to worry about batteries running dead when I need them the
          most.

          MEANT 2B
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