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Re: [Hammock Camping] Keeping warm in winter

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  • Dave Womble
    ... problems with ... Yeah I do and I can t get past the safely issues. I don t think silnylon is flame retardant to start with, I don t think our WinterTarp
    Message 1 of 17 , Jan 3, 2009
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <ed@...> wrote:
      >
      > Youngblood, do you have any thoughts on safety or condensation
      problems with
      > this stove & the WinterTarp? ..Ed
      >

      Yeah I do and I can't get past the safely issues. I don't think
      silnylon is flame retardant to start with, I don't think our
      WinterTarp is large enough when closed off for a wood burning stove,
      and I think you might want something with a shape that was more
      accommodating and had some means of exhausting the fumes for a wood
      burning stove.

      Our WinterTarp is designed for backpacking and as such it was designed
      to be flexible enough to handle a wide range of conditions. When
      backpacking with hammocks you don't always want your shelter closed
      off or be confined to cleared and flat tent spots with appropriate
      trees. Sometimes you just want rain protection and as much view as
      possible, and sometimes you might want to camp on a slope in a cove
      protected from the wind, etc. You are looking at something pretty
      specialized when you are talking about a hammock tent/tarptent that
      safely accommodates a wood burning stove for warmth.

      Dave Womble
      aka Youngblood 2000AT
      designer of the Speer Segmented Pad Extender, SnugFit Underquilt, and
      WinterTarp
    • Dave Womble
      ... nights) ... Thanks Ralph... I just looked over their site http://www.heatmax.com/HotHands/index.htm and they have a variety of products for this. I can see
      Message 2 of 17 , Jan 3, 2009
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn" <Ralph.oborn@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Ed, I've been using the "hot hands" warmers for years while snow camping
        > with my scouts.
        > I would vote for them as the way to go over an electrical sytem.
        >
        > 1. Cheap (50 cents each)
        > 2. Reliable (keep them in your winter pack)
        > 3. Light weight (couple of oz each)
        > 4. Flexible (don't use for warm nights, use two or three for cold
        nights)
        > 5. No chance of an electrical.
        > 6. Uncomplicated
        > 7. Proven
        >
        > Ralph (Pocatello)
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        Thanks Ralph... I just looked over their site
        http://www.heatmax.com/HotHands/index.htm and they have a variety of
        products for this.

        I can see why you like them so much, with the climate you are in and
        the Boy Scouts. I suspect they are required safety items for you?
        They make a lot of sense for those just in case situations where
        something happens you weren't prepared for or when you just need a
        little more than what you have.

        Dave
      • Horace
        Hi I just spent 3 nights in a tipi style tent with a larger wood burning stove. Banked up with 3-4 arm to leg thick pieces of wood it would stay warm for about
        Message 3 of 17 , Jan 4, 2009
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          Hi I just spent 3 nights in a tipi style tent with a larger wood
          burning stove. Banked up with 3-4 arm to leg thick pieces of wood it
          would stay warm for about 2-3 hours. Outside temperatures where around
          freezing and it meant I could relax in comfort. Would be intresting to
          try the stove out near to the hammock setup with additional tarps to
          hold the heat a bit. Would certainly be warner than an open fire.
          The sides can glow with wood so would be reluctant to try cardboard.
          Also paper and cardboard throw out more ash and that which could
          potentially pose a fire risk.
          I only burnt wood and with doors closed it seemed ok for CO? May have
          to get a CO tester to be sure next time.

          Nigel

          Sent from my iPhone!


          On 2 Jan 2009, at 22:57, ratsmouth@... wrote:

          > Glad someone else brought up the CO issue with charcoal. I lost a high
          > school friend who thought it was okay to light a hibachi in a (sort
          > of)
          > enclosed space to keep warm one night. It was the last thing she ever
          > did. She left behind a two year old son. She was only 20.
          >
          > Ratty
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Bill Fornshell <bfornshell@...>
          > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 3:49 pm
          > Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Keeping warm in winter
          >
          > Hi Ed,
          >
          > I don't know anyone that has used one of these. I talked to Doug last
          > week about something and just had a look over the things he sells. I
          > was really surprised at the low weight of his lightest stove.
          >
          > On the question about using charcoal, I think charcoal puts of carbon
          > monoxide which would not be so good. It might be fun to do some
          > testing with one of these. At 17 ounces for his lightest stove a
          > light
          > hiker could about carry one of these and still be under 25 pounds.
          >
          > Bill in Texas
          >
          > --- On Fri, 1/2/09, Ed Speer <ed@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: Ed Speer <ed@...>
          >
          > Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Keeping warm in winter
          >
          > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 2:23 PM
          >
          > The Titanium Goat stove does look good Bill. Do you know of anyone
          > who's
          >
          > t
          > ried one? How long does it burn before needing more fuel? Could you
          > use
          >
          > charcoal instead of wood? .Ed
          >
          > Moderator, Hammock Camping List
          >
          > Author, Hammock Camping book
          >
          > Editor, Hammock Camping Newsletters
          >
          > Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc
          >
          > From: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:hammockcamping@
          > yahoogroups. com]
          >
          > On Behalf Of Bill Fornshell
          >
          > Sent: Friday, January 02, 2009 3:08 PM
          >
          > To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com
          >
          > Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Keeping warm in winter
          >
          > Hi,
          >
          > Check out one of these wood stoves from Titanium Goat. Look at the
          > lightest
          >
          > version. Just over 1 pound.
          >
          > http://www.titanium goat.com/ cstove.html
          >
          > If you had something like a tent around and over your hammock one of
          > these
          >
          > might work.
          >
          > If it was setup right you might be able to feed the stove without
          > getting
          >
          > out of your hammock.
          >
          > Bill in Texas
          >
          > --- On Fri, 1/2/09, ginohav <ginohav@yahoo. com <mailto:ginohav%
          > 40yahoo.com>
          >
          > > wrote:
          >
          > From: ginohav <ginohav@yahoo. com <mailto:ginohav% 40yahoo.com> >
          >
          > Subject: [Hammock Camping] Keeping warm in winter
          >
          > To: hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:hammockcamp
          > ing%40yahoogroup s.com>
          >
          > Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 12:5
          > 8 PM
          >
          > My son spent a couple of days in Maine camping out in 10 degree
          >
          > weather. I asked him how he keep warm and he told me he used an
          >
          > emergeny car powerstart battery assy. and plugged in his small heater
          >
          > set on 500 watts and it lasted two 8 hr nights. Here's another
          > thought,
          >
          > use a winter tarp with a Zodi propane heater. Lugging around
          > Powerstart
          >
          > car batteries and Zodi heaters only adds a couple of more pounds
          >
          > conpared with lugging around underquits and more padding. Each style
          > of
          >
          > camping will have different sets of parameters. The style of camping
          >
          > using heaters and winter tents will only appeal to campers who pull
          >
          > small sleds while snowshoeing in on flat terrain and could care less
          >
          > about adding an extra couple of pounds. I think using special designed
          >
          > winter hammocks is the way to go for winter hammocking rather then
          >
          > modifing a 3 season hammock for winter conditions. Just my thoughts
          > and
          >
          > nothing is set in stone.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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