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Hammock Camping Re: Summer and the hammock

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  • Risk
    Thanks Bear, Yeah, I do just fine with the Target 3/8 pad down to about 30 with just a quilt. Add some fleece under me (micro fleece long pants and a
    Message 1 of 27 , Jul 1, 2003
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      Thanks Bear,

      Yeah, I do just fine with the Target 3/8 pad down to about 30 with
      just a quilt. Add some fleece under me (micro fleece long pants and
      a pullover) and I'm good down to below 20. Below that and I need a
      second pad.

      Your info about when you drop the pad entirely is very useful.

      Rick

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Chinell"
      <dchinell@m...> wrote:
      > Rick:
      >
      > I'm still proofing my temperature chart, but I use a 3/8
      > inch closed-cell pad between 55 and 65, and drop the pad
      > when it's over 65. I think I'm a cold sleeper.
      >
      > I also think a windblock device, like a poncho or GI might
      > do the trick once it's over 60. I just haven't been able to
      > test that.
      >
      > Bear
    • J Cornelius
      Ok y’all – I am totally happy sleeping in a hammock. Beats a bed by a mile!! I now have my Byer Traveller hammock hanging in my room – but – after
      Message 2 of 27 , Jul 1, 2003
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        Ok y’all – I am totally happy sleeping in a hammock.  Beats a bed by a mile!!  I now have my Byer Traveller hammock hanging in my room – but – after only a couple of weeks in it, the strands are starting to break (had one break last night – hard time going back to sleep after that wondering if the blooming thing was gonna crash on me in the middle of the night!!).  I will be sleeping in this thing every night.  BUT – here is the problem – I have to be able to hang it within a 9 ½ foot area.  Any suggestions?  Remember, this thing will be used EVERY night.

         

        T’anks y’all!

        Jodi

         

        Abnormality is THE normality at this locality

         

      • J Cornelius
        I love hammocks!! They ROCK How do you pronounce fuggoargy?? Foo-go - agy?? Don t wanna end up swearing!! LOL Jodi Abnormality is THE normality at
        Message 3 of 27 , Jul 1, 2003
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          I love hammocks!!  They ROCK <grin>

           

          How do you pronounce fuggoargy??  Foo-go – agy??

           

          Don’t wanna end up swearing!! LOL

          Jodi

           

          Abnormality is THE normality at this locality

           

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Ed Speer [mailto:info@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2003 11:14 AM
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: Hammock Camping up date, seize continues

           

          It sure is additive, isn't it Robi!

           

          Fuggoagy......what a wonderful word!  Maybe we shoud exchange words!!!  .....Ed

           

        • J Cornelius
          I found that I need the pad up to 60 degrees - I used to sleep really hot, but now, since I lost 90 lbs, I find I sleep cooler. So much for the insulation
          Message 4 of 27 , Jul 1, 2003
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            I found that I need the pad up to 60 degrees – I used to sleep really hot, but now, since I lost 90 lbs, I find I sleep cooler.  So much for the insulation layer LOL.  I’ll keep the pad tho and leave the 90 lbs out!!  But once I get to 60, I sleep just in the sleeping bag (a 35 degree bag) and usually leave it unzipped unless it rains in the night and the damp makes my joints ache.

             

            My two cents

            Jodi

             

            Abnormality is THE normality at this locality

             

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Risk [mailto:geoflyfisher@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2003 12:39 PM
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Hammock Camping Re: Summer and the hammock

             

            Jim wrote:
            >
            > I stopped using a pad when the temps got to 50 at night. I sleep in
            > a bag which gives me something underneath (sometimes unzipped
            > though) until the temps are mid-60s at which point I use the bag as
            > a quilt with nothing under me & the hammock.
            >
            Thanks Jim!  This is just the info I was wanting.  Personally, with a
            nightime temp of 50 I had a problem with cold back at 3AM a few
            months back, using just a sleeping bag.  Perhaps you sleep warmer
            than I do. 

            Other's experiences?  I don't remember Ed covering this in the
            otherwise complete book.  However, it is likely that his book is more
            complete than my memory.  I was reading it in the winter with a
            particular set of filters in my brain.

            Rick



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          • Ed Speer
            Jodi, I feel your pain! Having a hammock fail under you is certainly not conducive for sleep! Your hanging space is limited and thus not suitable for many
            Message 5 of 27 , Jul 1, 2003
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              Jodi, I feel your pain!  Having a hammock fail under you is certainly not conducive for sleep!
               
              Your hanging space is limited and thus not suitable for many stands that  angle outward as much as 15'.  Instead of a stand, can you mount directly to the walls?  I've hung my hammock in the bedroom using 3/4" thick eyebolts screwed into 4' long 2X4's that are mounted horizontially so they could be screwed into several of the vertical studs inside the walls--dosen't look pretty, but it works.  My walls are sheetrock over thin boards.  Attaching the horizontal 2X4's to the wall studs is the key--I used lots of 4" long screws.  This has held for several years now and I too sleep in the hammock nearly every night.
               
              Hope you're back up and sleeping soon!  ....Ed
               
               
              -----Original Message-----
              From: J Cornelius [mailto:dojers@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2003 7:00 PM
              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Hammock Camping Question on a HEAVY USE hammock

              Ok y’all – I am totally happy sleeping in a hammock.  Beats a bed by a mile!!  I now have my Byer Traveller hammock hanging in my room – but – after only a couple of weeks in it, the strands are starting to break (had one break last night – hard time going back to sleep after that wondering if the blooming thing was gonna crash on me in the middle of the night!!).  I will be sleeping in this thing every night.  BUT – here is the problem – I have to be able to hang it within a 9 ½ foot area.  Any suggestions?  Remember, this thing will be used EVERY night.

               

              T’anks y’all!

              Jodi

               

              Abnormality is THE normality at this locality

               




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            • J Cornelius
              Thanks Ed – I am currently attached to the walls – no room for a stand. The hammock is what is giving out – I’m thinking I got a badly made one as it
              Message 6 of 27 , Jul 1, 2003
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                Thanks Ed – I am currently attached to the walls – no room for a stand.  The hammock is what is giving out – I’m thinking I got a badly made one as it “cants” – meaning one side is actually higher than the other when stretched out – even when sleeping “right” in it, my head is higher than my feet – which is fine for me as I usually prefer to sleep that way, but the “string” is what broke at the woven eye of the hammock.  That’s why I need something that will definitely fit in that space – it will be hanging from the walls.

                 

                Hopefully, when I sleep in it tonite, I don’t bounce off the floor LOL  No, sleeping in a bed is not an option as I now don’t have one – gave my bed to my son LOL <sigh>

                 

                Jodi – here’s hoping strings hold!!  I think I’ll go to Buffalo and get one of the cotton hammocks – unless they need 10’ or more to hang – in which case I dunno what I’ll do – except maybe pick up another Traveller and hope it works better this time.

                 

                Abnormality is THE normality at this locality

                 

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Ed Speer [mailto:info@...]
                Sent:
                Tuesday, July 01, 2003 8:20 PM
                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: Hammock Camping Question on a HEAVY USE hammock

                 

                Jodi, I feel your pain!  Having a hammock fail under you is certainly not conducive for sleep!

                 

                Your hanging space is limited and thus not suitable for many stands that  angle outward as much as 15'.  Instead of a stand, can you mount directly to the walls?  I've hung my hammock in the bedroom using 3/4" thick eyebolts screwed into 4' long 2X4's that are mounted horizontially so they could be screwed into several of the vertical studs inside the walls--dosen't look pretty, but it works.  My walls are sheetrock over thin boards.  Attaching the horizontal 2X4's to the wall studs is the key--I used lots of 4" long screws.  This has held for several years now and I too sleep in the hammock nearly every night.

                 

                Hope you're back up and sleeping soon!  ....Ed

                 

                 

                -----Original Message-----
                From: J Cornelius [mailto:dojers@...]
                Sent:
                Tuesday, July 01, 2003 7:00 PM
                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Hammock Camping Question on a HEAVY USE hammock

                Ok y’all – I am totally happy sleeping in a hammock.  Beats a bed by a mile!!  I now have my Byer Traveller hammock hanging in my room – but – after only a couple of weeks in it, the strands are starting to break (had one break last night – hard time going back to sleep after that wondering if the blooming thing was gonna crash on me in the middle of the night!!).  I will be sleeping in this thing every night.  BUT – here is the problem – I have to be able to hang it within a 9 ½ foot area.  Any suggestions?  Remember, this thing will be used EVERY night.

                 

                T’anks y’all!

                Jodi

                 

                Abnormality is THE normality at this locality

                 

                 



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              • colonelcorn76
                ... with a ... Maybe. The bag I use is a 30 (or 35?) degree down mummy bag. So even though I m compressing what s under me it seems to hold enough to keep me
                Message 7 of 27 , Jul 1, 2003
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                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Risk" <geoflyfisher@y...>
                  wrote:

                  > Thanks Jim! This is just the info I was wanting. Personally,
                  with a
                  > nightime temp of 50 I had a problem with cold back at 3AM a few
                  > months back, using just a sleeping bag. Perhaps you sleep warmer
                  > than I do.

                  Maybe. The bag I use is a 30 (or 35?) degree down mummy bag. So even
                  though I'm compressing what's under me it seems to hold enough to
                  keep me from getting chilled (I also usually wear some sort of
                  clothing to bed -- last week it was a t-shirt and silk boxers). The
                  shell on the bag is water repellent (not waterproof) so it's likely
                  to be keeping the air from moving through easily as well.

                  Jim
                • colonelcorn76
                  ... and get ... in ... Traveller ... Call the Hennesseys and ask about a Scout model or a customization of one of their other models. No doubt they ll be able
                  Message 8 of 27 , Jul 1, 2003
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                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "J Cornelius" <dojers@c...>
                    wrote:
                    > Jodi – here's hoping strings hold!! I think I'll go to Buffalo
                    and get
                    > one of the cotton hammocks – unless they need 10' or more to hang –
                    in
                    > which case I dunno what I'll do – except maybe pick up another
                    Traveller
                    > and hope it works better this time.

                    Call the Hennesseys and ask about a Scout model or a customization
                    of one of their other models. No doubt they'll be able to help you
                    out.

                    Jim
                  • alidisaster
                    Wasn t there someone on the list who makes heavy cotton hammocks? Maybe they could make one that would fit in your space? Cotton hammocks can really last -
                    Message 9 of 27 , Jul 2, 2003
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                      Wasn't there someone on the list who makes heavy cotton hammocks?
                      Maybe they could make one that would fit in your space? Cotton
                      hammocks can really last - and they are very comfy.

                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "colonelcorn76"
                      <colonelcorn76@y...> wrote:
                      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "J Cornelius" <dojers@c...>
                      > wrote:
                      > > Jodi – here's hoping strings hold!! I think I'll go to Buffalo
                      > and get
                      > > one of the cotton hammocks – unless they need 10' or more to
                      hang –
                      > in
                      > > which case I dunno what I'll do – except maybe pick up another
                      > Traveller
                      > > and hope it works better this time.
                      >
                      > Call the Hennesseys and ask about a Scout model or a customization
                      > of one of their other models. No doubt they'll be able to help you
                      > out.
                      >
                      > Jim
                    • Tony Burnett
                      Define micro fleece . Can you give me a brand example? I noticed that your gear lists shows a fleece at 19oz and a LJ pants at 5.3oz. I assume the later is
                      Message 10 of 27 , Jul 2, 2003
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                        Define "micro fleece". Can you give me a brand example?

                        I noticed that your gear lists shows a fleece at 19oz and a LJ pants
                        at 5.3oz. I assume the later is NOT fleece.

                        Do you wear "micro fleece" tops AND bottoms? If so, at what temps?

                        At 30F are you wearing anything?

                        --- Risk <geoflyfisher@...> wrote:
                        > Thanks Bear,
                        >
                        > Yeah, I do just fine with the Target 3/8 pad down to about 30 with
                        >
                        > just a quilt. Add some fleece under me (micro fleece long pants
                        > and
                        > a pullover) and I'm good down to below 20. Below that and I need a
                        >
                        > second pad.
                        >
                        > Your info about when you drop the pad entirely is very useful.


                        =====
                        Tony

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                      • Risk
                        Hi Tony, Let me try to remember some of the details. It s 90 degrees outside and its hard to think about the cold. ... The stuff I am talking about is about 1
                        Message 11 of 27 , Jul 2, 2003
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                          Hi Tony,

                          Let me try to remember some of the details. It's 90 degrees outside
                          and its hard to think about the cold.

                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Tony Burnett
                          <tburnettcis@y...> wrote:
                          > Define "micro fleece". Can you give me a brand example?

                          The stuff I am talking about is about 1 to 1.5 mm thick. I think it
                          is known in as Malden Mills 100 weight. It can be purchased at
                          Outdoor Wilderness Fabrics and other sources.
                          >
                          > I noticed that your gear lists shows a fleece at 19oz and a LJ pants
                          > at 5.3oz. I assume the later is NOT fleece.

                          Except in the dead of winter, my insulating layer for my legs is a
                          polypro pair of pants. On that list, the fleece top is made from 200
                          weight material.
                          >
                          > Do you wear "micro fleece" tops AND bottoms? If so, at what temps?

                          Nah, I almost never wear the fleece when actually hiking. Mainly
                          because I don't do a great deal of winter camping yet. When the
                          temps rise above freezing, I no longer need the fleece bottoms and
                          can just use polypro long underwear.
                          >
                          > At 30F are you wearing anything?

                          Yes, First layer is almost always a pair of nylon shorts and a
                          coolmax tee. At thirty, I would be wearing the long pants and the
                          fleece top. Long pants may either be the polypro, a pair of frogg
                          togg pants or a nylon breathable pair of pants. It has varied on
                          different hikes. By 45 degrees at the middle of the night, the long
                          johns are usually buried in the pack for emergency warmth.
                          >
                          I hope that helps.

                          Rick
                        • Shane Steinkamp
                          ... I m way behind in this list, so forgive me if I pull a Dawn... The lowest temperature you can go padless is a function of both humidity and wind speed.
                          Message 12 of 27 , Jul 2, 2003
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                            > Shane, some of your comments about sleeping in summertime
                            > LA come to mind, but I don't remember any of it with
                            > specific nightime lows mentioned.

                            I'm way behind in this list, so forgive me if I pull a Dawn...

                            The lowest temperature you can go padless is a function of both humidity and
                            wind speed. I've been very comfortable padless all the way down to 60, but
                            I've also been chilly in temperatures as high as 80. A stiff breeze can
                            take the heat right away from you. I almost ALWAYS carry the pad, just in
                            case.

                            Shane
                          • Shane Steinkamp
                            ... Send it back to Byer and ask them to replace it. There is no reason for it to wear out so quickly. OR Get a true Mayan Hammock as Christina mentioned. OR
                            Message 13 of 27 , Jul 2, 2003
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                              > I now have my Byer Traveller hammock hanging in my room –
                              > but – after only a couple of weeks in it, the strands are
                              > starting to break (had one break last night – hard time
                              > going back to sleep after that wondering if the blooming
                              > thing was gonna crash on me in the middle of the night!!).

                              Send it back to Byer and ask them to replace it. There is no reason for it
                              to wear out so quickly.

                              OR

                              Get a true Mayan Hammock as Christina mentioned.

                              OR

                              Call Tom or Ed and have them custom make you exactly what you want.

                              Shane
                            • David Anderson
                              ... Thanks for reminding me why I love the northwest in the summer! Most days we never hit 80, even at sea level. And if I go climb up a few thousand feet I
                              Message 14 of 27 , Jul 2, 2003
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                                At 11:15 PM 7/2/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                                >The lowest temperature you can go padless is a function of both humidity and
                                >wind speed. I've been very comfortable padless all the way down to 60, but
                                >I've also been chilly in temperatures as high as 80. A stiff breeze can
                                >take the heat right away from you. I almost ALWAYS carry the pad, just in
                                >case.
                                >
                                >Shane

                                Thanks for reminding me why I love the northwest in the summer! Most days
                                we never hit 80, even at sea level. And if I go climb up a few thousand
                                feet I get to sleep in nice comfortable 40 degree nights.


                                --
                                David Anderson
                                Moderator
                                http://www.BackpackGearTest.org
                              • Coy
                                Until Ranier rains on the parade! Coy Boy ... humidity and ... to 60, but ... breeze can ... pad, just in ... Most days ... thousand
                                Message 15 of 27 , Jul 3, 2003
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                                  Until Ranier rains on the parade!

                                  Coy Boy

                                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, David Anderson
                                  <danderson@b...> wrote:
                                  > At 11:15 PM 7/2/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                                  > >The lowest temperature you can go padless is a function of both
                                  humidity and
                                  > >wind speed. I've been very comfortable padless all the way down
                                  to 60, but
                                  > >I've also been chilly in temperatures as high as 80. A stiff
                                  breeze can
                                  > >take the heat right away from you. I almost ALWAYS carry the
                                  pad, just in
                                  > >case.
                                  > >
                                  > >Shane
                                  >
                                  > Thanks for reminding me why I love the northwest in the summer!
                                  Most days
                                  > we never hit 80, even at sea level. And if I go climb up a few
                                  thousand
                                  > feet I get to sleep in nice comfortable 40 degree nights.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --
                                  > David Anderson
                                  > Moderator
                                  > http://www.BackpackGearTest.org
                                • Erin
                                  All, I was fortunate to spend a couple summers in Barranquia, Colombia as a child. I visited friends of the family so I travelled without my parents. While
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Jul 3, 2003
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                                    All,

                                    I was fortunate to spend a couple summers in Barranquia, Colombia as
                                    a child. I visited friends of the family so I travelled without my
                                    parents. While in Colombia I was introduced to their wonderful
                                    hammocks. In that region they are brightly colored cotton fabric
                                    (perhaps 8'x5') with cotton string ends. I was able to bring a
                                    couple examples back with me. We usually used them to lounge inside
                                    our cabin in the Allegheny mountains of Western PA. At that time I
                                    was light enough to hang the hammocks off of 16 penny nails hammered
                                    into the rafters.

                                    I always wanted to use the hammock to sleep in but my parents (who
                                    layed in the hammocks like bananas in their skins) were convinced
                                    that my back would hurt and simply wouldn't permit it. They just
                                    didn't get it. I would lay in the hammocks diagonally (or even
                                    perpendicular to the hanging points), as I had seen them do in South
                                    America, and knew how wonderfully comfortable they really were.
                                    Amazingly, we slept in sleeping bags on bunks made out of old doors
                                    without padding... this was supposed to be more comfortable!?!?

                                    Anyway, and finally to my point, some 27 years later I still have
                                    those hammocks and they are still in great shape. This thread has
                                    convinced me that I need to hang these inside. I probably won't be
                                    able to convince my wife that we should be sleeping in separate
                                    hammocks so I won't be joining the hammock slumber devotees. But I
                                    do want to spend as many of my waking hours in a hammock as
                                    possible. I plan on using Ed's technique of tying a 2x4 into several
                                    studs. Ed, do you have your inside hammock attached diagonally
                                    between two attached walls or to two walls across from each other?
                                    Would either configuration leave any structural concerns? Call me
                                    paranoid (or maybe just ignorant... I really don't know much about
                                    construction) but I'm a little afraid of my 225 lbs pulling the walls
                                    in. If diagonal, is it important to have the hammock and walls
                                    create a 45/45/90 deg triangle or would 30/60/90 work as well? And,
                                    what about using a similar technique to tie into rafters? Any
                                    concerns with that?

                                    Thanks, everyone, for your contributions. You have all made this a
                                    really great list.


                                    Erin

                                    p.s. Ed: This is my first post so let me say "thank you" for your
                                    efforts and contributions to the list. I particularly respect the
                                    degree of objectivity and generosity that you manage given that you
                                    actually have a commercial interest in hammock camping.



                                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
                                    > Jodi, I feel your pain! Having a hammock fail under you is
                                    certainly
                                    > not conducive for sleep!
                                    >
                                    > Your hanging space is limited and thus not suitable for many stands
                                    that
                                    > angle outward as much as 15'. Instead of a stand, can you mount
                                    > directly to the walls? I've hung my hammock in the bedroom using
                                    3/4"
                                    > thick eyebolts screwed into 4' long 2X4's that are mounted
                                    horizontially
                                    > so they could be screwed into several of the vertical studs inside
                                    the
                                    > walls--dosen't look pretty, but it works. My walls are sheetrock
                                    over
                                    > thin boards. Attaching the horizontal 2X4's to the wall studs is
                                    the
                                    > key--I used lots of 4" long screws. This has held for several
                                    years now
                                    > and I too sleep in the hammock nearly every night.
                                    >
                                    > Hope you're back up and sleeping soon! ....Ed
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hammock_Camping_News>
                                    > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping>
                                    > -----Original Message-----
                                    > From: J Cornelius [mailto:dojers@c...]
                                    > Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2003 7:00 PM
                                    > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                    > Subject: Hammock Camping Question on a HEAVY USE hammock
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Ok y'all – I am totally happy sleeping in a hammock. Beats a bed
                                    by a
                                    > mile!! I now have my Byer Traveller hammock hanging in my room –
                                    but –
                                    > after only a couple of weeks in it, the strands are starting to
                                    break
                                    > (had one break last night – hard time going back to sleep after that
                                    > wondering if the blooming thing was gonna crash on me in the middle
                                    of
                                    > the night!!). I will be sleeping in this thing every night. BUT –
                                    here
                                    > is the problem – I have to be able to hang it within a 9 ½ foot
                                    area.
                                    > Any suggestions? Remember, this thing will be used EVERY night.
                                    >
                                    > T'anks y'all!
                                    > Jodi
                                    >
                                    > Abnormality is THE normality at this locality
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
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                                  • Ed Speer
                                    Welcome and thanks for the kind words Erin. My bedroom hammock is attached straight between opposite walls. Obviously sturdy walls are necessary--my old house
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Jul 3, 2003
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                                      Message
                                      Welcome and thanks for the kind words Erin.  My bedroom hammock is attached straight between opposite walls. Obviously sturdy walls are necessary--my old house has bomb-proof  rock and wood walls, but newer houses generally have less sturdy ones.  If in doubt, hanging the hammock diagonally near the corner between walls might be wise.   My two horizontal 4.5' 2X4s are very securely screwed into my walls such that each one crosses 3 vertical interior-wall studs--at each stud, 5 long screws (4" ea) secure the horizontal 2X4s; in addition numerous random shorter screws also secure the 2X4s to each wall between the studs.  This is a lot of screws, but I've not noticed any problems after 1.5 years of nightly use.  The anchor hardware is 1" eyebolts made from 1/2" dia steel--these screw into the horizontal 2X4s about 3" deep.  The eyebolts do NOT enter any studs, but it would probably be better if they did.
                                       
                                      Erin, hanging from raffters may require a similar reinforced setup.  Whatever you do, watch closely for developing damage or failure....Ed
                                       
                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: Erin [mailto:Erinnee@...]
                                      Sent: Thursday, July 03, 2003 11:42 AM
                                      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: Hammock Camping Question on a HEAVY USE hammock

                                      All,

                                      I was fortunate to spend a couple summers in Barranquia, Colombia as
                                      a child.  I visited friends of the family so I travelled without my
                                      parents.  While in Colombia I was introduced to their wonderful
                                      hammocks.  In that region they are brightly colored cotton fabric
                                      (perhaps 8'x5') with cotton string ends.  I was able to bring a
                                      couple examples back with me.  We usually used them to lounge inside
                                      our cabin in the Allegheny mountains of Western PA.  At that time I
                                      was light enough to hang the hammocks off of 16 penny nails hammered
                                      into the rafters. 

                                      I always wanted to use the hammock to sleep in but my parents (who
                                      layed in the hammocks like bananas in their skins) were convinced
                                      that my back would hurt and simply wouldn't permit it.  They just
                                      didn't get it.  I would lay in the hammocks diagonally (or even
                                      perpendicular to the hanging points), as I had seen them do in South
                                      America, and knew how wonderfully comfortable they really were. 
                                      Amazingly, we slept in sleeping bags on bunks made out of old doors
                                      without padding... this was supposed to be more comfortable!?!?

                                      Anyway, and finally to my point, some 27 years later I still have
                                      those hammocks and they are still in great shape.  This thread has
                                      convinced me that I need to hang these inside.  I probably won't be
                                      able to convince my wife that we should be sleeping in separate
                                      hammocks so I won't be joining the hammock slumber devotees.  But I
                                      do want to spend as many of my waking hours in a hammock as
                                      possible.  I plan on using Ed's technique of tying a 2x4 into several
                                      studs.  Ed, do you have your inside hammock attached diagonally
                                      between two attached walls or to two walls across from each other? 
                                      Would either configuration leave any structural concerns?  Call me
                                      paranoid (or maybe just ignorant... I really don't know much about
                                      construction) but I'm a little afraid of my 225 lbs pulling the walls
                                      in.  If diagonal, is it important to have the hammock and walls
                                      create a 45/45/90 deg triangle or would 30/60/90 work as well?  And,
                                      what about using a similar technique to tie into rafters?  Any
                                      concerns with that?

                                      Thanks, everyone, for your contributions.  You have all made this a
                                      really great list.


                                      Erin

                                      p.s.  Ed:  This is my first post so let me say "thank you" for your
                                      efforts and contributions to the list.  I particularly respect the
                                      degree of objectivity and generosity that you manage given that you
                                      actually have a commercial interest in hammock camping.



                                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
                                      > Jodi, I feel your pain!  Having a hammock fail under you is
                                      certainly
                                      > not conducive for sleep!

                                      > Your hanging space is limited and thus not suitable for many stands
                                      that
                                      > angle outward as much as 15'.  Instead of a stand, can you mount
                                      > directly to the walls?  I've hung my hammock in the bedroom using
                                      3/4"
                                      > thick eyebolts screwed into 4' long 2X4's that are mounted
                                      horizontially
                                      > so they could be screwed into several of the vertical studs inside
                                      the
                                      > walls--dosen't look pretty, but it works.  My walls are sheetrock
                                      over
                                      > thin boards.  Attaching the horizontal 2X4's to the wall studs is
                                      the
                                      > key--I used lots of 4" long screws.  This has held for several
                                      years now
                                      > and I too sleep in the hammock nearly every night.

                                      > Hope you're back up and sleeping soon!  ....Ed


                                      >  <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hammock_Camping_News>
                                      >  <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping>
                                      > -----Original Message-----
                                      > From: J Cornelius [mailto:dojers@c...]
                                      > Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2003 7:00 PM
                                      > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                      > Subject: Hammock Camping Question on a HEAVY USE hammock
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Ok y'all – I am totally happy sleeping in a hammock.  Beats a bed
                                      by a
                                      > mile!!  I now have my Byer Traveller hammock hanging in my room –
                                      but –
                                      > after only a couple of weeks in it, the strands are starting to
                                      break
                                      > (had one break last night – hard time going back to sleep after that
                                      > wondering if the blooming thing was gonna crash on me in the middle
                                      of
                                      > the night!!).  I will be sleeping in this thing every night.  BUT –
                                      here
                                      > is the problem – I have to be able to hang it within a 9 ½ foot
                                      area.
                                      > Any suggestions?  Remember, this thing will be used EVERY night.

                                      > T'anks y'all!
                                      > Jodi

                                      > Abnormality is THE normality at this locality

                                      >
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                                    • Shane
                                      ... Absolutely. Down here in the muck and the mire, there are certain drawbacks. I wish I could say that it was worth it... There are, of course, more than
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Jul 3, 2003
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                                        > Thanks for reminding me why I love the northwest in
                                        > the summer! Most days we never hit 80, even at sea
                                        > level. And if I go climb up a few thousand feet I
                                        > get to sleep in nice comfortable 40 degree nights.

                                        Absolutely. Down here in the muck and the mire, there are certain
                                        drawbacks. I wish I could say that it was worth it...

                                        There are, of course, more than enough trees to hang hammocks from. There
                                        is no tree line until you hit the water, and hiking in February doesn't
                                        involve ice storms...

                                        Shne
                                      • David Anderson
                                        ... Yeah, winter weather can be entertaining, that s why I stick with the coast in the winter. Summers with a late snowpack are more annoying though. In late
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Jul 3, 2003
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                                          At 04:50 PM 7/3/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                                          > > Thanks for reminding me why I love the northwest in
                                          > > the summer! Most days we never hit 80, even at sea
                                          > > level. And if I go climb up a few thousand feet I
                                          > > get to sleep in nice comfortable 40 degree nights.
                                          >
                                          >Absolutely. Down here in the muck and the mire, there are certain
                                          >drawbacks. I wish I could say that it was worth it...
                                          >
                                          >There are, of course, more than enough trees to hang hammocks from. There
                                          >is no tree line until you hit the water, and hiking in February doesn't
                                          >involve ice storms...
                                          >
                                          >Shne

                                          Yeah, winter weather can be entertaining, that's why I stick with the coast
                                          in the winter. Summers with a late snowpack are more annoying though. In
                                          late July most of the trails that went above 5000' at any point still had
                                          snow. And summer slushy snow is a lot less fun than winter snow and ice.

                                          As for the trees, I've never had trouble finding trees sinc4e I rarely camp
                                          above treeline. It's more of a problem with needing 30' tree straps if I'm
                                          in an old growth area.

                                          At some point I would like try hanging a hammock over the water from a
                                          canoe just to claim that I'd done it. The danger is that I'm not always to
                                          lucid when I wake up in the morning (okay, make that "never") and would
                                          probably end up as gator bait.

                                          --
                                          David Anderson
                                          Moderator
                                          http://www.BackpackGearTest.org
                                        • Risk
                                          Short report on the 3-4th trip focused on the padand the temperature. My Frau Diane (Newly trail named EllieD) and I did a gentle 6 miles in the heat and
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Jul 5, 2003
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                                            Short report on the 3-4th trip focused on the padand the temperature.

                                            My Frau Diane (Newly trail named EllieD) and I did a gentle 6 miles
                                            in the heat and humidity on Thursday. Set up camp in an approved
                                            campsite at Zalinsli State Forest, Ohio. Temp 92 degrees. Humidity
                                            about 90 percent...

                                            I agree strongly with Shane about one thing, temperature and wind are
                                            both important, as is humidity.

                                            By sun down it was down to 86 degrees and we went to the trees. No
                                            pad. No wind (<5mph) I was able to get to sleep fairly cool and did
                                            well. About 2 or 3 AM as the temps dropped below 70, My back felt a
                                            little cool to touch, but I was not cold. EllieD said she had the
                                            same experience. If it had dropped a few more degrees or if the wind
                                            had picked up, I would have taken the few seconds it would have taken
                                            to slide the pad out of my pack and between the two layers of my
                                            hammock.

                                            Next day did a fun 10 miles along a forested canyon with many
                                            waterfalls. That felt good!

                                            Pics soon, I promise.

                                            Risk
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