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Re: [Hammock Camping] Springer Mtn Campout Dec 31, 2008

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  • Bruce W. Calkins
    I find that a crossed pair of 3 foot by 2 foot 1/4 inch closed cell pads with a 3/4 length thermarest on top of that might get me to freezing. I have a few
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 6, 2008
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      I find that a crossed pair of 3 foot by 2 foot 1/4 inch closed cell pads
      with a 3/4 length thermarest on top of that might get me to freezing. I
      have a few ideas for colder, but at this point, I have little time to spend
      testing. I did try a twin sized mattress pad slung under the hammock last
      fall with moderate success. Some trimming would help that one, especially
      after the cat sharpened her claws on it last summer.



      Bruce W.



      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      I guess I meant, "Would my ThermaRest work?" Skip the "regular" part. I use
      a Women's ProLite 3. It's pretty narrow, I guess. How about a 22" wide
      closed-cell foam pad?

      MacGyver
    • EHamilton
      Kinda sounds like, if I want to try a hammock, I ll have my  husband send it to me with my summer sleeping bag... MacGyver ________________________________
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 6, 2008
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        Kinda sounds like, if I want to try a hammock, I'll have my  husband send it to me with my summer sleeping bag...

        MacGyver



        ________________________________

        From: Bruce W. Calkins blackwolfe@...
        I find that a crossed pair of 3 foot by 2 foot 1/4 inch closed cell pads
        with a 3/4 length thermarest on top of that might get me to freezing.  I
        have a few ideas for colder, but at this point, I have little time to spend
        testing.  I did try a twin sized mattress pad slung under the hammock last
        fall with moderate success.  Some trimming would help that one, especially
        after the cat sharpened her claws on it last summer.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dave Womble
        ... send it to me with my summer sleeping bag... ... You can get cold from underneath with pads sleeping in shelters or tents as well. The ProLite3 might not
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 6, 2008
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, EHamilton
          <imagainst_the_wind@...> wrote:
          >
          > Kinda sounds like, if I want to try a hammock, I'll have my  husband
          send it to me with my summer sleeping bag...
          >
          > MacGyver
          >

          You can get cold from underneath with pads sleeping in shelters or
          tents as well. The ProLite3 might not be enough by itself in the
          cooler months even when used on the ground. That is basically
          ThermaRest's lightest and less insulating self inflating mat. The
          reason it is the lightest is because it doesn't have as much
          insulation as say the ProLite4 does or even some of the other
          thicker/heavier models. That said, a lot of AT thru hikers probably
          get by with using it the whole way, but they might have some
          uncomfortably cool nights because of it. I started out with their
          comparable 1" model that predated the ProLite3 when I did my thru hike
          but I was able to avoid most of the cold conditions... I wasn't too
          proud to stay in motels and such when storms where about. Other folks
          I hiked around/with weren't always so fortunate and they had some real
          challenging nights at staying warm.

          When you get cold sleeping outdoors, you need to try and pay attention
          and see if you can localize where you are getting cold at. Sometimes
          people blame their top side insulation when their issue is their
          bottom side insulation. If you are cold because you don't have enough
          bottom side insulation, you aren't going to be okay by just adding
          more top side insulation. That holds true in shelters, tents, tarps,
          hammocks, etc. What you can do in those situations is get cold on the
          bottom and be too hot and sweating on top if you mismatch your
          insulation too much. In other words, it wouldn't make much sense to
          me to use a 0F sleeping bag with just a ProLite3 when a ProLite3 might
          start being insufficient for 'you' at 30 to 40F when sleeping on the
          ground. (I emphasised 'you' because individuals can vary on what keeps
          them warm.)
        • EHamilton
          All good info. Actually I ve been thinking of getting a second pad anyway, just a $6 closed-cell from Wal-Mart, for the extra cushioning. Bones getting a
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 6, 2008
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            All good info. Actually I've been thinking of getting a second pad anyway, just a $6 closed-cell from Wal-Mart, for the extra cushioning. Bones getting a little creaky here, I ain't a young'un.

            Now we're getting back into the advantages of a hammock.... no hard surfaces.

            MacGyver




            ________________________________
            From: Dave Womble <dpwomble@...>
            You can get cold from underneath with pads sleeping in shelters or
            tents as well.  The ProLite3 might not be enough by itself in the
            cooler months even when used on the ground.  That is basically
            ThermaRest's lightest and less insulating self inflating mat.  The
            reason it is the lightest is because it doesn't have as much
            insulation as say the ProLite4 does or even some of the other
            thicker/heavier models.  That said, a lot of AT thru hikers probably
            get by with using it the whole way, but they might have some
            uncomfortably cool nights because of it.  I started out with their
            comparable 1" model that predated the ProLite3 when I did my thru hike
            but I was able to avoid most of the cold conditions... I wasn't too
            proud to stay in motels and such when storms where about.  Other folks
            I hiked around/with weren't always so fortunate and they had some real
            challenging nights at staying warm.

            When you get cold sleeping outdoors, you need to try and pay attention
            and see if you can localize where you are getting cold at.  Sometimes
            people blame their top side insulation when their issue is their
            bottom side insulation.  If you are cold because you don't have enough
            bottom side insulation, you aren't going to be okay by just adding
            more top side insulation.  That holds true in shelters, tents, tarps,
            hammocks, etc.  What you can do in those situations is get cold on the
            bottom and be too hot and sweating on top if you mismatch your
            insulation too much.  In other words, it wouldn't make much sense to
            me to use a 0F sleeping bag with just a ProLite3 when a ProLite3 might
            start being insufficient for 'you' at 30 to 40F when sleeping on the
            ground. (I emphasised 'you' because individuals can vary on what keeps
            them warm.)


            ------------------------------------

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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Bruce W. Calkins
            That is what it took for my wife to get comfortable sleeping on the ground. Black Wolfe Bruce W. ... Actually I ve been thinking of getting a second pad
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 6, 2008
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              That is what it took for my wife to get comfortable sleeping on the ground.

              Black Wolfe
              Bruce W.

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              Actually I've been thinking of getting a second pad anyway, just a $6
              closed-cell from Wal-Mart, for the extra cushioning.

              MacGyver
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