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Re: Is 1 stud enough?

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  • Rosaleen Sullivan
    Hi, J.A.- I m not a carpenter, nor do I play one on TV... Could the hammock hanging conundrum be solved in a more aestheticly-pleasing manner described
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 23, 2008
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      Hi, J.A.-

      I'm not a carpenter, "nor do I play one on TV..." <w>

      Could the hammock hanging conundrum be solved in a more aestheticly-pleasing
      manner described next?

      Choose load-bearing walls. Install a pair (opposite each other) of wooden
      shelves with aprons at a height that works for the hammock. Hide a steel
      plate behind the apron, if necessary. Install carriage bolts through the
      aprons into 2 or 3 studs, passing as well through the steel plates. Plug
      the holes to cover the bolts. Install eye bolts in the placements of
      choice, and some "Shaker pegs." Place knick-knacks, books, hiking
      memorabelia/gear on shelves and decorative or functional items on pegs. If
      the hammock is taken down for any reason, just hang something over the eye
      bolts for camoflage.

      I THINK this would spread out the load when the hammock is used. If
      load-bearing walls are not available to this project, I would be looking at
      maybe installing a vertical floor to ceiling component that could attach to
      the ceiling and floor and be made decorative.

      Is this at all workable, in your professional opinion?

      Regards,

      Rosaleen

      Re: Is 1 stud enough?
      Posted by: "j.a. tackett" conifir1@... conifir1
      Date: Sun Nov 23, 2008 3:53 am ((PST))

      being a carpenter of 30 plus years.....you will pull that eye bolt out....

      i do not know if you own your house.......but if you do ....you can take a
      2x6 with a plate on the cieling running from joist to joist mounted with
      screws and a plate on the floor running from floor joist to floor joist
      mounted
      with screws and a verticle 4x4 mounted to these 2 plates....that will do
      it.....and drill a hole in each verticle 4x4 for a nice secure tie down
      .....that is how i would approach this project

      if you want to make this more appealing to the eye then you will be tearing
      out
      sheet rock or plaster and flooring to mount your verticle to the house
      framing
      with carriage bolts....
      then repairing your sheet rock and flooring ......

      either way good luck
    • Carey Parks
      One solution I heard about but have not tried personally is to hang the hammock from a 2x4 beam running across the room so the beam takes the load in
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 23, 2008
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        One solution I heard about but have not tried personally is to hang the
        hammock from a 2x4 beam running across the room so the beam takes the load
        in compression. The beam is held in a wooden "U" bracket on both ends, this
        brackett then only carries 1/2 of your weight in a vertical direction, which
        a couple lag bolts into the 2x4 will easily manage. When you take dowm the
        hammock the beam can be lifted out as well and placed along the floor out of
        the way. Perhaps the person who actually did this will chime in with a
        long-term use report. It makes sense to me.

        Carey

        -----Original Message-----
        From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of dennis barrett
        Sent: Sunday, November 23, 2008 9:27 AM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Is 1 stud enough?


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Neal" <nealaustin@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've been out in the hammock quite a bit and want to hang a hammock in
        > a room in my house. I have a typical American house with 2x4 studs
        > that are 16" apart under gypsum board. My question is: If I screw a
        > eye-bolt with into a stud in each of the walls would it hold? Would
        > the horozontal pull possibly damage the walls. The walls are 9 feet
        > apart and non-load bearing. Would I need to structure the load over 2
        > studs? I weigh 200 lbs
        >

        I have my eno hanging in my house, but my tie points are next to a window
        and a closet,
        so I have extra support there, but still into 2x4. a problem with setting
        the eye bolt is
        getting the height right for the distance between the two tie off points.
        You could always
        put a second hole in, if you had to ..... but as already mentioned, going
        the route of better
        safe than ...... , yeah that's always a good idea! of course you could
        always make a
        "bracket" for the eyebolts by spanning two 2x4s using a 2x8 (or bigger).
        paint or
        decorate it as you'd like .... but then you'd have 4 bolts in your wall
        holding your eyebolt
        bracket to the wall. btw, I use my hammock in my house everyday, sometimes
        sleep in it
        or tap naps during the day, like now, as I've got a terrible cold/flu
        ....... Mostly I watch tv
        in my hammock .... I bet this idea will become the next new home
        decorating tv idea ...






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • j.a. tackett
        i was just taking the idea of replacing the 4x4`s like being trees..... yeah if some thought is put into it you probablly could come up with something that is
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 23, 2008
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          i was just taking the idea of replacing the 4x4`s like being trees.....
          yeah if some thought is put into it you probablly could come up with something that is pleasing to the eye.....personally i like open walls ...to each their own....

          --- On Sun, 11/23/08, Rosaleen Sullivan <rosaleen43@...> wrote:

          From: Rosaleen Sullivan <rosaleen43@...>
          Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Is 1 stud enough?
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, November 23, 2008, 8:23 AM






          Hi, J.A.-

          I'm not a carpenter, "nor do I play one on TV..." <w>

          Could the hammock hanging conundrum be solved in a more aestheticly- pleasing
          manner described next?

          Choose load-bearing walls. Install a pair (opposite each other) of wooden
          shelves with aprons at a height that works for the hammock. Hide a steel
          plate behind the apron, if necessary. Install carriage bolts through the
          aprons into 2 or 3 studs, passing as well through the steel plates. Plug
          the holes to cover the bolts. Install eye bolts in the placements of
          choice, and some "Shaker pegs." Place knick-knacks, books, hiking
          memorabelia/ gear on shelves and decorative or functional items on pegs. If
          the hammock is taken down for any reason, just hang something over the eye
          bolts for camoflage.

          I THINK this would spread out the load when the hammock is used. If
          load-bearing walls are not available to this project, I would be looking at
          maybe installing a vertical floor to ceiling component that could attach to
          the ceiling and floor and be made decorative.

          Is this at all workable, in your professional opinion?

          Regards,

          Rosaleen

          Re: Is 1 stud enough?
          Posted by: "j.a. tackett" conifir1@yahoo. com conifir1
          Date: Sun Nov 23, 2008 3:53 am ((PST))

          being a carpenter of 30 plus years.....you will pull that eye bolt out....

          i do not know if you own your house....... but if you do ....you can take a
          2x6 with a plate on the cieling running from joist to joist mounted with
          screws and a plate on the floor running from floor joist to floor joist
          mounted
          with screws and a verticle 4x4 mounted to these 2 plates....that will do
          it.....and drill a hole in each verticle 4x4 for a nice secure tie down
          .....that is how i would approach this project

          if you want to make this more appealing to the eye then you will be tearing
          out
          sheet rock or plaster and flooring to mount your verticle to the house
          framing
          with carriage bolts....
          then repairing your sheet rock and flooring ......

          either way good luck


















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Arye P. R.
          In a word no ! don t risk it. 1- 2x4 stud that is 16 apart will not work with time they will bow under the weight and you will have cracked walls and or the
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 23, 2008
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            In a word no ! don't risk it. 1- 2x4 stud that is 16" apart will not work with time they will bow under the weight and you will have cracked walls and or the screw eye may rip out. Furthermore depending on how secure the walls/studs are to the floor and celling you may even pull the whole wall down.

            You could use a 2x8 or 10 x 24 inches wide horizontally mounted on the outside of the walls to spread the weight between two vertical studs. Than use 2 eye-bolts through a horizontal 2x4on the inside the walls bolted through to the outside 2x8.

            Personally I would build a frame of 3- 4x4s and 1- 2x4. One 4x4 horizontal at the top stretching between and lag screwed into 2 vertical 4x4s against the walls with a 2x4 as a stretcher at the bottom to keep the legs from pulling in. Than L brackets to support horizontal legs on the floor to keep it all vertical. With this you can hang the hammock from the top or from the sides or hang 2 hammock chairs from the top side by side.

            Don't use screw-eyes, use eye-bolts that go clear through and use oversize washers before securing the nuts on the bolt

            Or a frame of steel pipe as described elsewhere on this forum.
            see
            <http://www.imrisk.com/hammockstand/hammockstand.htm>
            and
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping/message/5036>
            in the photo section see image 6 in the album 'Rainbow04'
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping/photos/album/2054279391/pic/list>
            <http://www.hammockcamping.com/Free%20Reports/HomeMade%20Stand.htm>




            Sapere Aude,

            Arye P. Rubenstein


            Imagination is more important than knowledge...
            It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education... Albert Einstein




            ________________________________
            From: Neal <nealaustin@...>
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, November 22, 2008 9:31:08 PM
            Subject: [Hammock Camping] Is 1 stud enough?


            I've been out in the hammock quite a bit and want to hang a hammock in
            a room in my house. I have a typical American house with 2x4 studs
            that are 16" apart under gypsum board. My question is: If I screw a
            eye-bolt with into a stud in each of the walls would it hold? Would
            the horozontal pull possibly damage the walls. The walls are 9 feet
            apart and non-load bearing. Would I need to structure the load over 2
            studs? I weigh 200 lbs



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • tim garner
              Not bad Rosaleen. I ran a carriage bolt through an exterior wall & secured it w/ a small metal plate & bolt on the outside.     But that s a creative way
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 23, 2008
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                Not bad Rosaleen. I ran a carriage bolt through an exterior wall & secured it w/ a small metal plate & bolt on the outside.
                  But that's a creative way you described, to use an inside wall & keep it looking good.

              don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!

              --- On Sun, 11/23/08, Rosaleen Sullivan <rosaleen43@...> wrote:
              From: Rosaleen Sullivan <rosaleen43@...>
              Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Is 1 stud enough?
              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Sunday, November 23, 2008, 10:23 AM

              Hi, J.A.-

              I'm not a carpenter, "nor do I play one on TV..." <w>

              Could the hammock hanging conundrum be solved in a more aestheticly-pleasing
              manner described next?

              Choose load-bearing walls. Install a pair (opposite each other) of wooden
              shelves with aprons at a height that works for the hammock. Hide a steel
              plate behind the apron, if necessary. Install carriage bolts through the
              aprons into 2 or 3 studs, passing as well through the steel plates. Plug
              the holes to cover the bolts. Install eye bolts in the placements of
              choice, and some "Shaker pegs." Place knick-knacks, books, hiking
              memorabelia/gear on shelves and decorative or functional items on pegs. If
              the hammock is taken down for any reason, just hang something over the eye
              bolts for camoflage.

              I THINK this would spread out the load when the hammock is used. If
              load-bearing walls are not available to this project, I would be looking at
              maybe installing a vertical floor to ceiling component that could attach to
              the ceiling and floor and be made decorative.

              Is this at all workable, in your professional opinion?

              Regards,

              Rosaleen

              Re: Is 1 stud enough?
              Posted by: "j.a. tackett" conifir1@... conifir1
              Date: Sun Nov 23, 2008 3:53 am ((PST))

              being a carpenter of 30 plus years.....you will pull that eye bolt out....

              i do not know if you own your house.......but if you do ....you can take a
              2x6 with a plate on the cieling running from joist to joist mounted with
              screws and a plate on the floor running from floor joist to floor joist
              mounted
              with screws and a verticle 4x4 mounted to these 2 plates....that will do
              it.....and drill a hole in each verticle 4x4 for a nice secure tie down
              .....that is how i would approach this project

              if you want to make this more appealing to the eye then you will be tearing
              out
              sheet rock or plaster and flooring to mount your verticle to the house
              framing
              with carriage bolts....
              then repairing your sheet rock and flooring ......

              either way good luck



              ------------------------------------

              Yahoo! Groups Links








              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • CHRISNIMON@AOL.COM
              I did this in my old house. I weigh 219 lbs. slept in it 2 - 3 times a week and never had a problem. BUT I? did make sure i had plenty of droop so that there
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 24, 2008
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                I did this in my old house. I weigh 219 lbs. slept in it 2 - 3 times a week and never had a problem.
                BUT I? did make sure i had plenty of droop so that there was more downward?pressure?on the stud rather than horizontal.


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Andrew Raney
                I use three 1/4 eyebolts at each end with a climbing load equalizer , and have supported over 350 pounds with no crumbling walls. The eyebolts are at about a
                Message 7 of 16 , Nov 24, 2008
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                  I use three 1/4" eyebolts at each end with a climbing "load equalizer",
                  and have supported over 350 pounds with no crumbling walls.
                  The eyebolts are at about a 30* angle so there is no downward pull on
                  the wood.
                  Andrew
                • Neal
                  I really like Carey s Idea and after thinking it through I think that s the solution that I will be choosing. First I will be using two Eye-bolts on each wall
                  Message 8 of 16 , Nov 24, 2008
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                    I really like Carey's Idea and after thinking it through I think
                    that's the solution that I will be choosing. First I will be using two
                    Eye-bolts on each wall into a stud exactly 1 2x4 height above each
                    other. The 2x4 rests on the bottom eye-bolt( rated 175 lbs) with a
                    lagbolt between the two eyes and through the 2x4 (Kinda like a hinge).
                    Another eyed lagbolt will go through the 2x4 with the eye on the
                    bottom. This solution can also go into a corner of a room using two
                    adjacent walls. The 2x4 resting on the eye-bolt absorbs all of the
                    horizontal pull. The Stud in the wall can absorb the vertical weight.
                    It's easily removable with only the 4 eye-bolts remaining in the two
                    walls. One reason I want to use this hinge type construction is
                    because the Studs in the opposing walls don't line up. Also I will be
                    connecting two 2x4's together with 3 lag-bolts (2 with wing-nuts 1
                    normal) to make the 2x4 bar foldable and thus more portable.
                  • amendment2@aol.com
                    The biggest problem I see with bthat is the potential for two eyebolts 3 1/2 to 4 inches apart to split the stud. You definitely want to drill a pilot hole and
                    Message 9 of 16 , Nov 26, 2008
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                      The biggest problem I see with bthat is the potential for two eyebolts 3 1/2 to 4 inches apart to split the stud. You definitely want to drill a pilot hole and you want the hole centered on the studs. Good luck! Tell us how.it works out.
                      Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: "Neal" <nealaustin@...>

                      Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2008 18:14:23
                      To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re:Is 1 stud enough?


                      I really like Carey's Idea and after thinking it through I think
                      that's the solution that I will be choosing. First I will be using two
                      Eye-bolts on each wall into a stud exactly 1 2x4 height above each
                      other. The 2x4 rests on the bottom eye-bolt( rated 175 lbs) with a
                      lagbolt between the two eyes and through the 2x4 (Kinda like a hinge).
                      Another eyed lagbolt will go through the 2x4 with the eye on the
                      bottom. This solution can also go into a corner of a room using two
                      adjacent walls. The 2x4 resting on the eye-bolt absorbs all of the
                      horizontal pull. The Stud in the wall can absorb the vertical weight.
                      It's easily removable with only the 4 eye-bolts remaining in the two
                      walls. One reason I want to use this hinge type construction is
                      because the Studs in the opposing walls don't line up. Also I will be
                      connecting two 2x4's together with 3 lag-bolts (2 with wing-nuts 1
                      normal) to make the 2x4 bar foldable and thus more portable.



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Neal
                      You are right. I thought about that too. I did use the same size eye-bolt for the top and bottom but I drilled good sized pilot holes for both. Now I realize
                      Message 10 of 16 , Nov 27, 2008
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                        You are right. I thought about that too. I did use the same size
                        eye-bolt for the top and bottom but I drilled good sized pilot holes
                        for both. Now I realize that the top bolt can be pretty wimpy because
                        it's only purpose is to stabilize the 2x4 and that mostly when putting
                        up the beam.I have slept in the hammock 3 nights and it is VERY
                        stable. Remember that the actual hammock hanging eyes are on the
                        bottom of the 2x4.



                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, amendment2@... wrote:
                        >
                        > The biggest problem I see with that is the potential for two
                        eyebolts 3 1/2 to 4 inches apart to split the stud. You definitely
                        want to drill a pilot hole and you want the hole centered on the
                        studs. Good luck! Tell us how.it works out.
                      • Arye P. R.
                        good luck finding the stud center through the wall. Better yet would be to replace the 2x4 with a 2x8 or 2x12 placed on the other side of the wall spanning
                        Message 11 of 16 , Nov 28, 2008
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                          good luck finding the stud center through the wall.

                          Better yet would be to replace the 2x4 with a 2x8 or 2x12 placed on the other side of the wall spanning horizontally across at least 2 studs and place the eye bolts at least 12 inches (30cm) apart just through the walls (not the studs) and through to the 2x8 or 2x12. A piece of webbing or re-bar between the eye bolts can be used to anchor the hammock too.
                          To disguise the 2x's attach a 1x with screws or brackets to form a shelf, finish as would like if not with paint or stain try a self adhesive product like Contact Paper (self adhesive vinyl product
                          <http://housewares.hardwarestore.com/37-188-contact-papers.aspx>)
                          Additionally the same can be done to disguise 2x's on the hammock side that can be installed to prevent the eye-bolts from pulling together if webbing is used.

                          Sapere Aude

                          Arye P. Rubenstein

                          Imagination is more important than knowledge...
                          It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education... Albert Einstein






                          ________________________________
                          From: "amendment2@..." <amendment2@...>
                          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2008 9:34:31 PM
                          Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re:Is 1 stud enough?


                          The biggest problem I see with bthat is the potential for two eyebolts 3 1/2 to 4 inches apart to split the stud. You definitely want to drill a pilot hole and you want the hole centered on the studs. Good luck! Tell us how.it works out.
                          Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: "Neal" <nealaustin@yahoo. com>

                          Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2008 18:14:23
                          To: <hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com>
                          Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re:Is 1 stud enough?


                          I really like Carey's Idea and after thinking it through I think
                          that's the solution that I will be choosing. First I will be using two
                          Eye-bolts on each wall into a stud exactly 1 2x4 height above each
                          other. The 2x4 rests on the bottom eye-bolt( rated 175 lbs) with a
                          lagbolt between the two eyes and through the 2x4 (Kinda like a hinge).
                          Another eyed lagbolt will go through the 2x4 with the eye on the
                          bottom. This solution can also go into a corner of a room using two
                          adjacent walls. The 2x4 resting on the eye-bolt absorbs all of the
                          horizontal pull. The Stud in the wall can absorb the vertical weight.
                          It's easily removable with only the 4 eye-bolts remaining in the two
                          walls. One reason I want to use this hinge type construction is
                          because the Studs in the opposing walls don't line up. Also I will be
                          connecting two 2x4's together with 3 lag-bolts (2 with wing-nuts 1
                          normal) to make the 2x4 bar foldable and thus more portable.

                          __._,_.__

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • aethericpower
                          ... I used a metal pole hanging on window frames before. I used some clothing to stablize the pole from rolling on the frames. My hammock was tied to the pole.
                          Message 12 of 16 , Dec 8, 2008
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                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Neal" <nealaustin@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I've been out in the hammock quite a bit and want to hang a hammock in
                            > a room in my house. I have a typical American house with 2x4 studs
                            > that are 16" apart under gypsum board. My question is: If I screw a
                            > eye-bolt with into a stud in each of the walls would it hold? Would
                            > the horozontal pull possibly damage the walls. The walls are 9 feet
                            > apart and non-load bearing. Would I need to structure the load over 2
                            > studs? I weigh 200 lbs
                            >

                            I used a metal pole hanging on window frames before. I used some
                            clothing to stablize the pole from rolling on the frames. My hammock
                            was tied to the pole.

                            Currently I am using a stand that looks like this but cost me $19 from
                            FogDog.
                            http://www.amazon.com/Wenzel-823104-Deluxe-Hammock-
                            Stand/dp/B0019X00PC/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=sporting-
                            goods&qid=1228778445&sr=1-6

                            It works fine, just takes up a lot of space in terms of length.
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