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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: solar chargers

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  • pure mahem
    Seeing how you would be using this for cycling... instead of using the heavy car battery wouldn t it make more sense to use a rechargeable 6 volt lantern
    Message 1 of 31 , Oct 12, 2008
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      Seeing how you would be using this for cycling... instead of using the heavy car battery wouldn't it make more sense to use a rechargeable 6 volt lantern battery. With that alone you just got cheap and about 25 lbs lighter than a car battery!!!!!



      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Moz <list@...>
      To: Ralph Oborn <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, October 12, 2008 6:05:23 PM
      Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: solar chargers


      Ralph Oborn said:
      > How close do you have to match the voltage and current?

      Very. The things you listed will probably take +/- 5% on voltage but
      the same total power will be required. Powering a laptop requires
      either a big panel or a working battery in the laptop, plus the supply
      requirement is a worst case one for the most part. My laptop power
      supply is rated at 4.5A but rarely draws more than 3. Not that that is
      much relief, it's still 50W. But in practice if it's shut down it will
      charge quite happily at about 1A so the 20W panel is adequate.

      ja "dotty" hackett is at best ill-informed. If you buy cheap junk it
      will not work, leaving you out of pocket the "cheap" price and still
      wanting to fulfill the original requirement. Especially with solar
      gear, the iron law of engineering holds very true - light, cheap,
      reliable: pick any two.

      If cheap is the main criteria buy naked amorphous panels and wire them
      into a home-built housing, then get a cheap solar regulator and an old
      car battery (often available free, but very low joules/kg rating at
      that point), then find 12V supplies for all your stuff. A setup like
      that could be almost free if you're good at scrounging, especially if
      you can find some discarded solar toys (ideally a 12V car battery
      top-up charger (these are fairly common in Australia)).

      For lightweight, a 1kg li-ion battery fed by a flexible panel via a
      supercap and smart charger, powering the laptop directly and the other
      stuff via custom-built smart regulators would be very light (but
      around $1000 in parts alone, you'd need to arrange access to a surface
      mount fab yourself).

      The compromise I used works for me and was a balance between
      affordable and what I was willing to carry.

      Moz






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    • j.a. tackett
      thanks this should keep me busy for awhile......   just got my super shelter in the post today.........   raining here   tomorrow i will go and see how it
      Message 31 of 31 , Oct 15, 2008
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        thanks this should keep me busy for awhile......
         
        just got my super shelter in the post today.........
         
        raining here
         
        tomorrow i will go and see how it sets up

        --- On Tue, 10/14/08, Arye P Rubenstein <aprarye@...> wrote:

        From: Arye P Rubenstein <aprarye@...>
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: solar chargers
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, October 14, 2008, 10:41 PM






        another place to check for solar stuff is
        <http://scientificso nline.com/ category. asp_Q_c_E_ 421196>

        Good luck


















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