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Re: [Hammock Camping] JRB nests & Hennessey Hammock at 3500 m and 0-10*C

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  • Cara Lin Bridgman
    Thanks Tim, but my sleepingbag-hammock budget is pretty much blown for this decade... I was thinking about it during this past trip, but will have to make do
    Message 1 of 39 , Sep 7 8:36 PM
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      Thanks Tim, but my sleepingbag-hammock budget is pretty much blown for
      this decade... I was thinking about it during this past trip, but will
      have to make do with what I've already got.

      CL

      tim garner wrote:
      > Probably not the answer you're looking for Cara, but the Speer Snugfit Underquilt has effectively solved most (if not all) of those problems.
      > If you ever get a chance to check one out, I think you would love it.
      >
      > don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!
      >
      > --- On Sun, 9/7/08, Cara Lin Bridgman <cara.lin@...> wrote:
      > From: Cara Lin Bridgman <cara.lin@...>
      > Subject: [Hammock Camping] JRB nests & Hennessey Hammock at 3500 m and 0-10*C
      > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Sunday, September 7, 2008, 10:00 PM
      >
      > Just finished a 5-day trip in which 4 of the nights were at >3400 m
      > (11,000 ft)in elevation. Nighttime lows were 0-10*C (32-50*F). Being
      > cold in the hammock was not necessarily correlated with temperature.
      > There was a huge correlation with getting the right fit between JRB nest
      > and the HH. In fact, I had to tinker with the adjustments (quilt
      > drawstrings and bungees) several times each night--no such thing as
      > getting the thing adjusted once and having it work for the whole trip.
      >
      > I found cold drafts leaking past the JBR Nest drawstrings and down
      > between the nest and the HH. Bungees seemed to stretch. I'm trying to
      > figure out if that stretch was a function of elevation (high),
      > temperature (low), humidity (high with lots of rain), or all 3. There
      > wasn't much wind. My elastic hairties, which usually last several
      > weeks, had to be replaced each day. So, there was something about the
      > conditions of this trip which were hard on elastic.
      >
      > If the JRB nest was adjusted right, it was toasty, even to about
      > 0*C--and I sleep cold. In fact, I was astounded at how well the JRB
      > No-Sniveler pumped the heat back to me!
      >
      > By the way, the Nest was velcroed to itself, so I was swinging it out of
      > the way to get into and out of the hammock. Before the trip, I did the
      > DIY Under Quilt Foot End Draw Cord Modification here:
      > <http://jacksrbetter.com/index_files/DIY.htm>. It did help.
      >
      > The snag was getting the JRB Nest adjusted properly. I use it or the
      > No-Sniveler as an underquilt in my top-loading hammock at home--never
      > have any problems.
      >
      > Part of the problem on this trip, was that the Nest didn't seem to be
      > spreading out properly to cover the wider parts of the hammock, meaning
      > for a cold shoulder and cold toes.
      >
      > Luckily, we had my 3/4-length thermarest with me. It worked fine in the
      > hammock for keeping my lower back warm. The point is, I'm sure that if
      > I could get the nest adjusted properly, I wouldn't have needed the
      > thermarest at all. I conclude this, because I had 3 nights with lows
      > between 7 and 10*C, two of those nights inside cement shelters (i.e. no
      > wind at all), and two nights were toasty and one night (the second
      > shelter night) was cold and required extra layers beneath my back.
      >
      > So, I'm interested to learn whether others have had problems with
      > bungees acting up and needing adjusting each night. Instructions at JRB
      > suggest that once adjusted, everything should be hunky dory from then on.
      >
      > I'm also interested to hear how others manage to reduce drafts from the
      > ends of the hammock (Nest drawstrings) and yet maintain coverage width.
      >
      > I found it frustrating that I couldn't get the adjustment right--the
      > Nest was almost always too loose (cold & drafty) or too tight (no
      > insulation and no spread across the hammock). It was even more
      > frustrating, because I've not experienced any of these problems with my
      > hammock at home. Admittedly, temperatures inside my home this summer
      > are almost >25*C, but we have fans and I sleep directly under the breeze
      > from the air conditioner.
      >
      > In Taiwan, we are still debating whether there really is a tree line.
      > In other words, are the lack of trees on peaks >3800 m the result of
      > climate or just an artifact of the fact the peaks are continually
      > shedding rock (earthquakes, etc). The 3886 m (>13,500 ft) peak we twice
      > climbed this trip, Shueshan (Snow Mountain), had Juniper trees crawling
      > all over it. None, though, were tall enough from which to suspend a
      > hammock and stay off the ground. We didn't camp there--too much thunder.
      >
      > CL
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >

      --

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Cara Lin Bridgman cara.lin@...

      P.O. Box 013 Shinjhuang http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin
      Longjing Township http://www.BugDorm.com
      Taichung County 43499
      Taiwan Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    • Richard Perlman
      Cara Lin, Have you thought about adding a solid barrier between you and the soggy fog? Perhaps Ed s 10 x 11 Winter Tarp?
      Message 39 of 39 , Sep 15 8:18 AM
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        Cara Lin,

        Have you thought about adding a "solid barrier"
        between you and the soggy fog?

        Perhaps Ed's 10' x 11' Winter Tarp?
        http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/Tarps.htm

        Rich



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