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HH tree huggers & tree damage

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  • Cara Lin Bridgman
    During this 6-day trip with 5 nights at elevation 3400 m, I hung from two species of trees: Cryptomeria sp (Japanese Cedar) and Juniperus sp. The Juniper is
    Message 1 of 39 , Sep 7, 2008
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      During this 6-day trip with 5 nights at elevation >3400 m, I hung from
      two species of trees: Cryptomeria sp (Japanese Cedar) and Juniperus sp.
      The Juniper is the only tree growing at Taiwan's highest elevations.
      It's also the one that shows krumholz (i.e. grows along the ground
      instead of standing tall) at high elevations.

      Even with the HH treehuggers, bark of both species showed clear evidence
      that I had hung from the trees. The Juniperus trees actually sustained
      some damage.

      The Cryptomeria just showed some compression on the bark:
      <080901-255HammockHang2-CryptomeriaSp-Hugger.JPG> and closeup
      <080901-254HammockHang2-CryptomeriaSp-Huggers.JPG>. This was no
      different from the previous experience. In another place (1500 m
      elevation) I monitored the recovery of two Cryptomeria trees after
      hanging from them one night. It took about a year for the trees to no
      longer show visible signs of the places where the tree huggers had
      wrapped around them.

      The Juniper, however, is a different story with different circumstances.
      First off, the trees were huge! Standard tree huggers were too small.
      On one tree, I managed to wrap the tree huggers around it once and a
      half: <080904-521HammockHang2-JuniperusSp-Huggers&Spectra.JPG>. This
      meant, the HH spectra was against the tree. This half of the tree had
      suffered previous damage, but the spectra shaved off bark and cut into
      the bark <080904-528HammockHang2-JuniperusSp-Huggers&Spectra.JPG>. The
      tree hugger webbing embossed itself onto the bark:
      <080904-530HammockHang2-JuniperusSp-back.JPG>.

      On the second tree, the tree huggers were large enough to go 3/4 the way
      around. This worked out ok, because years ago a branch had fallen off,
      making the trunk sort of concave. The HH spectra never came into
      contact with the tree: <080904-520HammockHang2-JuniperusSp-Hugger.JPG>.
      It was the tree huggers that were cutting into the bark and abrading
      the bark: <080904-534HammockHang2-JuniperusSp-hugger.JPG>. This was
      where there was some shifting as I entered and exited the hammock.
      There was also some compression of bark on the back of the tree:
      <080904-533HammockHang2-JuniperusSp-Back.JPG>.

      Admittedly, I definitely pushed the warrented weight limit for a HH
      backpacker asym. My husband and I both sat on it in chair mode for most
      of one afternoon. The HH backpacker asym is warrented for 200 lbs, we
      exceeded this by about 140 lbs. I had already noticed the damage to the
      bark that morning.

      CL
    • Richard Perlman
      Cara Lin, Have you thought about adding a solid barrier between you and the soggy fog? Perhaps Ed s 10 x 11 Winter Tarp?
      Message 39 of 39 , Sep 15, 2008
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        Cara Lin,

        Have you thought about adding a "solid barrier"
        between you and the soggy fog?

        Perhaps Ed's 10' x 11' Winter Tarp?
        http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/Tarps.htm

        Rich



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