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Re: [Hammock Camping] JRB nests & Hennessey Hammock at 3500 m and 0-10*C

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  • tim garner
    Probably not the answer you re looking for Cara, but the Speer Snugfit Underquilt has effectively solved most (if not all) of those problems. If you ever get a
    Message 1 of 39 , Sep 7 7:00 PM
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      Probably not the answer you're looking for Cara, but the Speer Snugfit Underquilt has effectively solved most (if not all) of those problems.
      If you ever get a chance to check one out, I think you would love it.

      don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!

      --- On Sun, 9/7/08, Cara Lin Bridgman <cara.lin@...> wrote:
      From: Cara Lin Bridgman <cara.lin@...>
      Subject: [Hammock Camping] JRB nests & Hennessey Hammock at 3500 m and 0-10*C
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, September 7, 2008, 10:00 PM

      Just finished a 5-day trip in which 4 of the nights were at >3400 m
      (11,000 ft)in elevation. Nighttime lows were 0-10*C (32-50*F). Being
      cold in the hammock was not necessarily correlated with temperature.
      There was a huge correlation with getting the right fit between JRB nest
      and the HH. In fact, I had to tinker with the adjustments (quilt
      drawstrings and bungees) several times each night--no such thing as
      getting the thing adjusted once and having it work for the whole trip.

      I found cold drafts leaking past the JBR Nest drawstrings and down
      between the nest and the HH. Bungees seemed to stretch. I'm trying to
      figure out if that stretch was a function of elevation (high),
      temperature (low), humidity (high with lots of rain), or all 3. There
      wasn't much wind. My elastic hairties, which usually last several
      weeks, had to be replaced each day. So, there was something about the
      conditions of this trip which were hard on elastic.

      If the JRB nest was adjusted right, it was toasty, even to about
      0*C--and I sleep cold. In fact, I was astounded at how well the JRB
      No-Sniveler pumped the heat back to me!

      By the way, the Nest was velcroed to itself, so I was swinging it out of
      the way to get into and out of the hammock. Before the trip, I did the
      DIY Under Quilt Foot End Draw Cord Modification here:
      <http://jacksrbetter.com/index_files/DIY.htm>. It did help.

      The snag was getting the JRB Nest adjusted properly. I use it or the
      No-Sniveler as an underquilt in my top-loading hammock at home--never
      have any problems.

      Part of the problem on this trip, was that the Nest didn't seem to be
      spreading out properly to cover the wider parts of the hammock, meaning
      for a cold shoulder and cold toes.

      Luckily, we had my 3/4-length thermarest with me. It worked fine in the
      hammock for keeping my lower back warm. The point is, I'm sure that if
      I could get the nest adjusted properly, I wouldn't have needed the
      thermarest at all. I conclude this, because I had 3 nights with lows
      between 7 and 10*C, two of those nights inside cement shelters (i.e. no
      wind at all), and two nights were toasty and one night (the second
      shelter night) was cold and required extra layers beneath my back.

      So, I'm interested to learn whether others have had problems with
      bungees acting up and needing adjusting each night. Instructions at JRB
      suggest that once adjusted, everything should be hunky dory from then on.

      I'm also interested to hear how others manage to reduce drafts from the
      ends of the hammock (Nest drawstrings) and yet maintain coverage width.

      I found it frustrating that I couldn't get the adjustment right--the
      Nest was almost always too loose (cold & drafty) or too tight (no
      insulation and no spread across the hammock). It was even more
      frustrating, because I've not experienced any of these problems with my
      hammock at home. Admittedly, temperatures inside my home this summer
      are almost >25*C, but we have fans and I sleep directly under the breeze
      from the air conditioner.

      In Taiwan, we are still debating whether there really is a tree line.
      In other words, are the lack of trees on peaks >3800 m the result of
      climate or just an artifact of the fact the peaks are continually
      shedding rock (earthquakes, etc). The 3886 m (>13,500 ft) peak we twice
      climbed this trip, Shueshan (Snow Mountain), had Juniper trees crawling
      all over it. None, though, were tall enough from which to suspend a
      hammock and stay off the ground. We didn't camp there--too much thunder.

      CL


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    • Richard Perlman
      Cara Lin, Have you thought about adding a solid barrier between you and the soggy fog? Perhaps Ed s 10 x 11 Winter Tarp?
      Message 39 of 39 , Sep 15 8:18 AM
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        Cara Lin,

        Have you thought about adding a "solid barrier"
        between you and the soggy fog?

        Perhaps Ed's 10' x 11' Winter Tarp?
        http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/Tarps.htm

        Rich



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