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Hennessy Tips??

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  • Tom
    Can anybody help? Since I m not young or Houdini or a contortionist I m having trouble getting my body, pad, bag and pillow up and into this hammock without a
    Message 1 of 29 , Jul 28, 2008
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      Can anybody help? Since I'm not young or Houdini or a contortionist I'm
      having trouble getting my body, pad, bag and pillow up and into this
      hammock without a lot of pulling, yanking, rolling to find out soon
      after "I'm there" I have to do it all again before the night is over.
      Not fun! Any speed tricks out there? Any help will be appreciated.
      Thanks!!
    • Ralph Oborn
      ... 1. Set up everything in the hammock carefully 2. Make sure your bag is unzipped about 1/2 way 3. Put your pillow and auxillary pads (hip and knee) in the
      Message 2 of 29 , Aug 10, 2008
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        On Mon, Jul 28, 2008 at 12:32 PM, Tom <thebaldguyd@...> wrote:



        > Can anybody help? Since I'm not young or Houdini or a contortionist I'm having
        > trouble getting my body, pad, bag and pillow up and into this
        > hammock without a lot of pulling, yanking, rolling to find out soon
        > after "I'm there" I have to do it all again before the night is over.
        > Not fun! Any speed tricks out there? Any help will be appreciated.
        > Thanks!!
        >




        1. Set up everything in the hammock carefully
        2. Make sure your bag is unzipped about 1/2 way
        3. Put your pillow and auxillary pads (hip and knee) in the ridge line
        4. When you climb in try yo put your butt about where you want it to be

        I'm trying to add a line inside from the head end to pull on to help me move
        and to hold stuff out of the way


        Ralph


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Carey Parks
        Use the bag as a quilt, leaving the foot box zipped to stabilize that end of things. I just toss the pillow and bag WAY up into the head end of the hammock,
        Message 3 of 29 , Aug 10, 2008
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          Use the bag as a quilt, leaving the foot box zipped to stabilize that end of
          things. I just toss the pillow and bag WAY up into the head end of the
          hammock, Fold or roll if a long pad the part of the pad that extends past
          the end of the slit back, sit down and lay back. Raising my butt allows the
          pad to flop down where it belongs. I pull my knees up, slip the footbox of
          the bag over my feet and put a small duffle bag with clothes or something
          under my knees to take pressure off my knees.

          You don't get much benefit from the sleeping bag that's compressed under you
          anyway. open the bag makes a very nice quilt in the hammock. Maybe a bit too
          wide, but as it's down not a problem. My very old 3 season bag and an
          equally old 3/4 in 3/4 length thermarest will get me down to 40. Below 40? I
          dunno. I live in Florida.

          C

          -----Original Message-----
          From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Ralph Oborn
          Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2008 10:35 AM
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Hennessy Tips??


          On Mon, Jul 28, 2008 at 12:32 PM, Tom <thebaldguyd@...> wrote:

          > Can anybody help? Since I'm not young or Houdini or a contortionist I'm
          having
          > trouble getting my body, pad, bag and pillow up and into this
          > hammock without a lot of pulling, yanking, rolling to find out soon
          > after "I'm there" I have to do it all again before the night is over.
          > Not fun! Any speed tricks out there? Any help will be appreciated.
          > Thanks!!
          >

          1. Set up everything in the hammock carefully
          2. Make sure your bag is unzipped about 1/2 way
          3. Put your pillow and auxillary pads (hip and knee) in the ridge line
          4. When you climb in try yo put your butt about where you want it to be

          I'm trying to add a line inside from the head end to pull on to help me
          move
          and to hold stuff out of the way

          Ralph

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • C C Wayah
          I m trying to add a line inside from the head end to pull on to help me move and to hold stuff out of the way Me too and I d also make my Ed Spear blow up
          Message 4 of 29 , Aug 11, 2008
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            I'm trying to add a line inside from the head end to pull on to help me
            move and to hold stuff out of the way

            Me too and I'd also make my Ed Spear blow up pillow a bag to insert it in
            and attach to the line as I can't keep my pillow from drifting to my feet
            with the slippery nylon fabric.

            Rogene
          • Cara Lin Bridgman
            Attaching the pillow to the end of the hammock is a great idea. That s one less thing to get piled up under your rear or to fall out of the hammock.
            Message 5 of 29 , Aug 12, 2008
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              Attaching the pillow to the end of the hammock is a great idea. That's
              one less thing to get piled up under your rear or to fall out of the
              hammock. Installing a pocket for book and water bottle is good, too. I
              keep getting bonked by my water bottle. I've been thinking of making a
              small hammock (maybe wider than it is long) to hang from the ridge-line
              in the extreme head, end. Then, I can just stuff things into it. Right
              now, it's all strings and clips and they're not working for the water
              bottle.

              I'm also finding that it's rather easy for things to get dumped out of
              the ridge-line pockets on my HH backpacker-asym. This, really, is only
              a concern when its my pencil that gets dumped out.

              What's really annoying is that every time I exit the hammock, I have to
              throw the quilt up behind me. Then, every time I get back into the
              hammock, I've got to push the quilt up towards the head end out of the
              way, get myself situated, and then throw the quilt back down over my
              feet. Any warmth in the down gets lost in a hurry!

              When I was sleeping on the ground, I'd stand up, step out of my sleeping
              bag (never bothering with the zipper), and flip the hood part over the
              rest of the sleeping bag. This way, the inside of the bag was still
              warm when I got back.

              With a top-entry hammock, it is a little easier to get in and out
              without disturbing the warmth. The problem with a top-entry hammock,
              though, is that it is much easier to lose all or part of the quilt over
              the side where it dumps on or drags on the ground. This is really only
              a problem if the ground is dirty or muddy.

              CL

              C C Wayah wrote:
              > I'd also make my Ed Spear blow up pillow a bag to insert it in
              > and attach to the line as I can't keep my pillow from drifting to my feet
              > with the slippery nylon fabric.
            • Amy Bailey
              That s why I gave in and got an underquilt. No pad. I use my sleepingbag as a topquilt with footbox. I throw the sleeping bag and pillow in ahead of me, get
              Message 6 of 29 , Aug 12, 2008
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                That's why I gave in and got an underquilt. No pad. I use my sleepingbag
                as a topquilt with footbox. I throw the sleeping bag and pillow in ahead of
                me, get in, make sure the velcro is velcroed, put the sleeping bag over top
                of me, put my feet into the bag, and my pillow under my head. I'm assuming
                it's cold, where ensuring that the velcro is closed is an issue for me. I
                first usually put my eyeglasses into the ridgeline pocket, hang the
                flashlight on the line, and toss my book in with the pillow.

                ---Amy


                On 7/28/08, Tom <thebaldguyd@...> wrote:
                >
                > Can anybody help? Since I'm not young or Houdini or a contortionist I'm
                > having trouble getting my body, pad, bag and pillow up and into this
                > hammock without a lot of pulling, yanking, rolling to find out soon
                > after "I'm there" I have to do it all again before the night is over.
                > Not fun! Any speed tricks out there? Any help will be appreciated.
                > Thanks!!
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Tom Galvin
                Was the underquilt a HH product or are there others out there that fit the HH? Any alterations needed? Thanks Tom ... From: Amy Bailey
                Message 7 of 29 , Aug 12, 2008
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                  Was the underquilt a HH product or are there others out there that fit the HH? Any alterations needed?
                  Thanks Tom

                  --- On Tue, 8/12/08, Amy Bailey <rosecentaur@...> wrote:

                  From: Amy Bailey <rosecentaur@...>
                  Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Hennessy Tips??
                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 3:35 PM






                  That's why I gave in and got an underquilt. No pad. I use my sleepingbag
                  as a topquilt with footbox. I throw the sleeping bag and pillow in ahead of
                  me, get in, make sure the velcro is velcroed, put the sleeping bag over top
                  of me, put my feet into the bag, and my pillow under my head. I'm assuming
                  it's cold, where ensuring that the velcro is closed is an issue for me. I
                  first usually put my eyeglasses into the ridgeline pocket, hang the
                  flashlight on the line, and toss my book in with the pillow.

                  ---Amy

                  On 7/28/08, Tom <thebaldguyd@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                  >
                  > Can anybody help? Since I'm not young or Houdini or a contortionist I'm
                  > having trouble getting my body, pad, bag and pillow up and into this
                  > hammock without a lot of pulling, yanking, rolling to find out soon
                  > after "I'm there" I have to do it all again before the night is over.
                  > Not fun! Any speed tricks out there? Any help will be appreciated.
                  > Thanks!!
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]















                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • C C Wayah
                  Now your cookin! ... My thoughts have been angelling on doing just this my self. However thinking I d connect the water bottle to the line above my head that
                  Message 8 of 29 , Aug 12, 2008
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                    Now your cookin!
                    >Attaching the pillow to the end of the hammock is a great idea.
                    >Installing a pocket for book and water bottle is good, too.

                    My thoughts have been angelling on doing just this my self. However thinking
                    I'd connect the water bottle to the line above my head that holds the pillow
                    or a second line? I have palenty of room to do this as I;m only 5 foot
                    tall. However if the bottle leaked!


                    > I've been thinking of making a small hammock (maybe wider than it is
                    > long) to hang from the ridge-line in the extreme head, end. Then, I can
                    > just stuff things into it. Right

                    I dont; know I would think it would swing and dump things. Interesting idea
                    though. perhpas one with a mesh liner to help hold things in.

                    > I'm also finding that it's rather easy for things to get dumped out of
                    > the ridge-line pockets on my HH backpacker-asym.

                    I was wondering if you could find some plastic magnetic
                    strips to close this pocket somehow. Velcro seams to hard to handle for such
                    a closure. No one whats to sleep with a pencil poking them.


                    > What's really annoying is that every time I exit the hammock, I have to
                    > throw the quilt up behind me.

                    Why? I just shove the quilt/slleping bag to one side or the other then slip
                    out of my hammock. Wiyth it bunched up like that it tends to retain the
                    heat.

                    The problem with a top-entry hammock, though, is that it is much easier
                    to lose all or part of the quilt over the side where it dumps on or drags
                    on the ground.

                    Ed Spears pea pod would solve this in a top loader I would think.

                    Rogene
                  • rosaleen43
                    Hi,Tom- You have some good tips already given. We each find what works best for us. One thing that can help reduce your pad s shifting is a piece of grippy
                    Message 9 of 29 , Aug 12, 2008
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                      Hi,Tom-

                      You have some good tips already given. We each find what works best for
                      us. One thing that can help reduce your pad's shifting is a piece of
                      grippy shelf liner between the pad and the hammock bottom.

                      Better yet, suspend a layer below and around the hammock bottom and lay
                      your pad on it. I keep a mylar space blanket around the outside of my
                      hammock, suspended with elastic, and guyed out to the side pullouts.
                      Depending on the temps, I can undo one side and move it out of the way,
                      deploy it, adding layers, like a Gossamer Gear Thinlight pad, and/or a
                      homemade fleece poncho. With these, it is simple to spread my sleeping
                      bag over me and use it as a quilt on any but the coldest nights.

                      Place pillows and other wanted items into a bag and toss in above you
                      or hold on your lap until you are situated in the hammock, then pull
                      them out to use them. I like to use a child's cut-down inflatable swim
                      cuff for a neck pillow. Stove Stomper suggested this on another forum
                      years ago. The biggest problem is finding a pair of the type that has
                      one flat side and two inflatable chambers. Cut off the flat side, and
                      one is left with a nice "V-shaped" pillow that cradles the neck and
                      stabilizes the head.

                      Another option is the SPE, Segmented Pad Extender. IIRC, Just Jeff
                      developed the one that Speer Hammocks sells. Slap one of those into
                      your hammock, with closed cell foam in the "wings," and use your
                      sleeping bag as a quilt.

                      Then,there are some options for quilts that hang under the hammock. My
                      personal preference is the layered space blanket/fleece poncho/pad
                      option. It is quick and cheap to make and can be used for various
                      needs.

                      Regards,

                      Rosaleen

                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <thebaldguyd@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Can anybody help? Since I'm not young or Houdini or a contortionist
                      I'm
                      >(SNIP)
                      >
                    • Cara Lin Bridgman
                      Hi Rosaleen, How do you handle the noise of a space blanket? Especially when there s a wind? CL
                      Message 10 of 29 , Aug 13, 2008
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                        Hi Rosaleen,

                        How do you handle the noise of a space blanket? Especially when there's
                        a wind?

                        CL

                        rosaleen43 wrote:
                        > I keep a mylar space blanket around the outside of my
                        > hammock, suspended with elastic, and guyed out to the side pullouts.
                        > Depending on the temps, I can undo one side and move it out of the way,
                        > deploy it, adding layers, like a Gossamer Gear Thinlight pad, and/or a
                        > homemade fleece poncho. With these, it is simple to spread my sleeping
                        > bag over me and use it as a quilt on any but the coldest nights.
                      • Cara Lin Bridgman
                        Hi Tom, Hennessey doesn t make an underquilt. They make a supershelter and underpad system( scroll down and
                        Message 11 of 29 , Aug 13, 2008
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                          Hi Tom,

                          Hennessey doesn't make an underquilt. They make a supershelter and
                          underpad system(<http://www.hennessyhammock.com/new-products.html>
                          scroll down and look for Supershelter). The problem is, no one seems
                          happy with it when the temperatures get below 50*F--but that is based on
                          reviews a year ago.

                          To me, the idea of a down blanket hanging under the hammock (like the
                          JRB nest
                          <http://jacksrbetter.com/index_files/Products%20List_files/Under%20Quilt.htm>)
                          made intuitive sense--it just costs lots! I was thinking long-term (>10
                          years of almost daily use) when I bought it, though. You see, I use the
                          nest under the hammock I sleep in at home. There are several places
                          that make synthetic underquilts. Online, there are also directions for
                          making your own.

                          Frankly, any rectangular (not mummy) sleeping bag (or blanket or fleece)
                          can be converted to an under quilt by adding draw strings and bungees at
                          the long ends.

                          CL

                          Tom Galvin wrote:
                          > Was the underquilt a HH product or are there others out there that fit the HH? Any alterations needed?
                          > Thanks Tom
                        • Amy Bailey
                          I havethe JRB Nest. http://jacksrbetter.com/index_files/Products%20List.htm They tend to run sales now and then, but I got mine used here:
                          Message 12 of 29 , Aug 13, 2008
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                            I havethe JRB Nest. http://jacksrbetter.com/index_files/Products%20List.htm
                            They tend to run sales now and then, but I got mine used here:
                            http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=28 People sell them
                            from time to time, as well as HH's and other hammocks. I splurged because I
                            was going to need a better sleeping bag for lightweight hiking anyway, and
                            the pad situation was really frustrating. I'll get the No Sniveler someday,
                            but meanwhile, I'm using a summer weight bag. :)

                            ---Amy


                            On Wed, Aug 13, 2008 at 5:09 AM, Cara Lin Bridgman
                            <cara.lin@...>wrote:

                            > Hi Tom,
                            >
                            > Hennessey doesn't make an underquilt. They make a supershelter and
                            > underpad system(<http://www.hennessyhammock.com/new-products.html>
                            > scroll down and look for Supershelter). The problem is, no one seems
                            > happy with it when the temperatures get below 50*F--but that is based on
                            > reviews a year ago.
                            >
                            > To me, the idea of a down blanket hanging under the hammock (like the
                            > JRB nest
                            > <
                            > http://jacksrbetter.com/index_files/Products%20List_files/Under%20Quilt.htm>)
                            >
                            > made intuitive sense--it just costs lots! I was thinking long-term (>10
                            > years of almost daily use) when I bought it, though. You see, I use the
                            > nest under the hammock I sleep in at home. There are several places
                            > that make synthetic underquilts. Online, there are also directions for
                            > making your own.
                            >
                            > Frankly, any rectangular (not mummy) sleeping bag (or blanket or fleece)
                            > can be converted to an under quilt by adding draw strings and bungees at
                            > the long ends.
                            >
                            > CL
                            >
                            >
                            > Tom Galvin wrote:
                            > > Was the underquilt a HH product or are there others out there that fit
                            > the HH? Any alterations needed?
                            > > Thanks Tom
                            >
                            >
                            >


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • rosaleen43
                            Hi,Cara Lin- The quick and fip answer is foam ear plugs. Once I m in the hammock and settled, I don t move around much,unlike my tossing and turning on the
                            Message 13 of 29 , Aug 13, 2008
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                              Hi,Cara Lin-

                              The quick and fip answer is "foam ear plugs."

                              Once I'm in the hammock and settled, I don't move around much,unlike
                              my tossing and turning on the ground or even a good bed. Therefore, I
                              don't notice the crinkling much. It also helps to have the mylar
                              blanket well-fastened and have that foam pad laid out on top of it.
                              It helps to have the blanket have a bit of weight on it. I supposed
                              a few pebbles or even spare socks could help, if not using the pad.

                              Regards,

                              Rosaleen

                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
                              <cara.lin@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi Rosaleen,
                              >
                              > How do you handle the noise of a space blanket? Especially when
                              there's
                              > a wind?
                              >
                              > CL
                              >
                              > rosaleen43 wrote:
                              > > I keep a mylar space blanket around the outside of my
                              > > hammock, suspended with elastic, and guyed out to the side
                              pullouts.
                              (SNIP)
                            • Thomas Vickers
                              I also use a space blanket between the HH underpad and the hammock (with the undercover). Once I get in it doesn t seem to make that much noise and if it does,
                              Message 14 of 29 , Aug 13, 2008
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                                I also use a space blanket between the HH underpad and the hammock
                                (with the undercover).
                                Once I get in it doesn't seem to make that much noise and if it does,
                                the ear plugs don't let it bother me.

                                TV
                              • Dave Womble
                                The Universal Model of the SnugFit Underquilt sold by Speer Hammocks will also fit the Hennessy Hammocks http://speerhammocks.com/Products/SnugFit.htm . It
                                Message 15 of 29 , Aug 13, 2008
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                                  The Universal Model of the SnugFit Underquilt sold by Speer Hammocks
                                  will also fit the Hennessy Hammocks
                                  http://speerhammocks.com/Products/SnugFit.htm . It was specifically
                                  designed for trouble free use as an underquilt for hammocks and there
                                  are significant advantages to it over other underquilts. Not only is
                                  the shape designed for fitting underneath a hammock without air gaps
                                  or significant compression of the down, but it uses a superior
                                  suspension system that maintains the fit when you reposition yourself
                                  or the hammock fabric stretches during the night.

                                  Dave Womble
                                  aka Youngblood 2000AT
                                  designer of the Speer Segmented Pad Extender, SnugFit Underquilt, and
                                  WinterTarp
                                • kwpapke
                                  ... there s ... I use an Adventure Medical Heatsheet: http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/kit_detail.asp?series=1000&seriesNav=&kit=2&kitNO=0140-0222 in my HH
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Aug 13, 2008
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                                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
                                    <cara.lin@...> wrote:

                                    > How do you handle the noise of a space blanket? Especially when
                                    there's
                                    > a wind?

                                    I use an Adventure Medical Heatsheet:


                                    http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/kit_detail.asp?series=1000&seriesNav=&kit=2&kitNO=0140-0222

                                    in my HH Explorer Supershelter. I've slept on the same one about 25
                                    times and it shows no signs of wear and tear, and is really quiet. No
                                    rustling like traditional space blankets.

                                    REI carries them.

                                    --Kurt
                                  • kwpapke
                                    ... based on ... I have used my Supershelter down to 23*F. A space blanket (I use the Adventure Medical Heatsheet) is absolutely required at lower temps - it
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Aug 13, 2008
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                                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
                                      <cara.lin@...> wrote:

                                      > Hennessey doesn't make an underquilt. They make a supershelter and
                                      > underpad system(<http://www.hennessyhammock.com/new-products.html>
                                      > scroll down and look for Supershelter). The problem is, no one seems
                                      > happy with it when the temperatures get below 50*F--but that is
                                      based on
                                      > reviews a year ago.

                                      I have used my Supershelter down to 23*F. A space blanket (I use the
                                      Adventure Medical Heatsheet) is absolutely required at lower temps -
                                      it gives you at least another 10 degrees.

                                      For me, the Supershelter with space blanket gets a little chilly at
                                      temperatures below 30*F, but that is also the temperature rating of my
                                      sleeping bag so I can't expect to stay piping hot at temps below that.

                                      Wind is also a huge factor - I've been cold in temps in the 40's in my
                                      SS if the wind is howling off a lake.

                                      The conventional hammock wisdom is that mummy sleeping bags are
                                      ineffective, and quilts are the way to go. I use my mummy bag as a
                                      quilt at warmer temps, but I can go at least another 10*F lower if I
                                      mummy-up. You can probably do as well with a quilt if you use a good
                                      balaclava, etc., but that mummy bag is awfully cozy when only my nose
                                      is poking out.

                                      --Kurt
                                    • Thomas Vickers
                                      I have used the HH underpad, undercover and a space blanket thing between the pad and hammock down to about 26 F. It worked fine for me. TV
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Aug 15, 2008
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                                        I have used the HH underpad, undercover and a space blanket thing between
                                        the pad and hammock down to about 26 F.
                                        It worked fine for me.

                                        TV
                                      • Thomas Vickers
                                        Thanks for the tip. I am going to have to try the heat sheet this winter TV
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Aug 15, 2008
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                                          Thanks for the tip. I am going to have to try the heat sheet this winter

                                          TV
                                        • billybob38801
                                          Hi CL, I have a SS that, once I figured out how to use it, has taken me to the high teens once, using a lot of tricks to get more out of it. But just as the
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Aug 22, 2008
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                                            Hi CL,
                                            I have a SS that, once I figured out how to use it, has taken me to
                                            the high teens once, using a lot of tricks to get more out of it. But
                                            just as the basic system, I have used it in the 30s a-ok many times.
                                            Now, it's not as convenient to use at really cold temps, as my PeaPod,
                                            which works GREAT!. But it does have it's charms and is a lot cheaper
                                            than a PeaPod. But is certainly has a learning curve, as do most of
                                            these hammock related items.
                                            Bill

                                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
                                            <cara.lin@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Hi Tom,
                                            >
                                            > Hennessey doesn't make an underquilt. They make a supershelter and
                                            > underpad system(<http://www.hennessyhammock.com/new-products.html>
                                            > scroll down and look for Supershelter). The problem is, no one seems
                                            > happy with it when the temperatures get below 50*F--but that is
                                            based on
                                            > reviews a year ago.
                                            >
                                            > To me, the idea of a down blanket hanging under the hammock (like the
                                            > JRB nest
                                            >
                                            <http://jacksrbetter.com/index_files/Products%20List_files/Under%20Quilt.htm>)

                                            > made intuitive sense--it just costs lots! I was thinking long-term
                                            (>10
                                            > years of almost daily use) when I bought it, though. You see, I use
                                            the
                                            > nest under the hammock I sleep in at home. There are several places
                                            > that make synthetic underquilts. Online, there are also directions for
                                            > making your own.
                                            >
                                            > Frankly, any rectangular (not mummy) sleeping bag (or blanket or
                                            fleece)
                                            > can be converted to an under quilt by adding draw strings and
                                            bungees at
                                            > the long ends.
                                            >
                                            > CL
                                            >
                                            > Tom Galvin wrote:
                                            > > Was the underquilt a HH product or are there others out there that
                                            fit the HH? Any alterations needed?
                                            > > Thanks Tom
                                            >
                                          • billybob38801
                                            Same here, I never hear the SB once I am in the hammock. And I do think that SB is essential for the SuperShelter to reach full potential. Bill
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Aug 22, 2008
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                                              Same here, I never hear the SB once I am in the hammock. And I do
                                              think that SB is essential for the SuperShelter to reach full potential.
                                              Bill

                                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Vickers" <redroach@...>
                                              wrote:
                                              >
                                              > I also use a space blanket between the HH underpad and the hammock
                                              > (with the undercover).
                                              > Once I get in it doesn't seem to make that much noise and if it does,
                                              > the ear plugs don't let it bother me.
                                              >
                                              > TV
                                              >
                                            • billybob38801
                                              I agree with you about the benefits of a mummy bag when approaching the sleeping bags/quilts lower limits. More than once I have been cold until I quit trying
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Aug 22, 2008
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                                                I agree with you about the benefits of a mummy bag when approaching
                                                the sleeping bags/quilts lower limits. More than once I have been cold
                                                until I quit trying to use my mummy bag as a quilt, gave up, got in
                                                and zipped up. Usually this seems to make an almost instant 10-20*F
                                                dif. ( However, dedicated quilts probably work better as a quilt than
                                                does my mummy bag, giving better draft seal at shoulders and neck)

                                                I think that is one reason the PeaPod works so superbly, in my
                                                experience: It somewhat mimics a mummy bag when closed down to a small
                                                breathing hole, or even better, closed all the way! Only more
                                                comfortable than a mummy bag. And similarly to the SuperShelter, a 2
                                                oz space blanket added between the hammock and PeaPod seems to add at
                                                least 10 degrees.
                                                Bill

                                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "kwpapke" <kwpapke@...> wrote:

                                                > I have used my Supershelter down to 23*F. A space blanket (I use the
                                                > Adventure Medical Heatsheet) is absolutely required at lower temps -
                                                > it gives you at least another 10 degrees.
                                                >
                                                > For me, the Supershelter with space blanket gets a little chilly at
                                                > temperatures below 30*F, but that is also the temperature rating of my
                                                > sleeping bag so I can't expect to stay piping hot at temps below that.
                                                >
                                                > Wind is also a huge factor - I've been cold in temps in the 40's in my
                                                > SS if the wind is howling off a lake.
                                                >
                                                > The conventional hammock wisdom is that mummy sleeping bags are
                                                > ineffective, and quilts are the way to go. I use my mummy bag as a
                                                > quilt at warmer temps, but I can go at least another 10*F lower if I
                                                > mummy-up. You can probably do as well with a quilt if you use a good
                                                > balaclava, etc., but that mummy bag is awfully cozy when only my nose
                                                > is poking out.
                                                >
                                                > --Kurt
                                                >
                                              • Cara Lin Bridgman
                                                Hi Bill, Glad to hear you step in with actual experience with the supershelter. All I knew was the reviews at backpackgeartest.org. I read those, probably in
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Aug 22, 2008
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                                                  Hi Bill,

                                                  Glad to hear you step in with actual experience with the supershelter.
                                                  All I knew was the reviews at backpackgeartest.org. I read those,
                                                  probably in 2006, before deciding on the JRB quilts.

                                                  CL

                                                  billybob38801 wrote:
                                                  > I have a SS that, once I figured out how to use it, has taken me to
                                                  > the high teens once, using a lot of tricks to get more out of it. But
                                                  > just as the basic system, I have used it in the 30s a-ok many times.
                                                  > Now, it's not as convenient to use at really cold temps, as my PeaPod,
                                                  > which works GREAT!. But it does have it's charms and is a lot cheaper
                                                  > than a PeaPod. But is certainly has a learning curve, as do most of
                                                  > these hammock related items.
                                                  > Bill
                                                  >
                                                  > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
                                                  > <cara.lin@...> wrote:
                                                  >> Hennessey doesn't make an underquilt. They make a supershelter and
                                                  >> underpad system(<http://www.hennessyhammock.com/new-products.html>
                                                  >> scroll down and look for Supershelter). The problem is, no one seems
                                                  >> happy with it when the temperatures get below 50*F--but that is
                                                  > based on
                                                  >> reviews a year ago.
                                                • ypsyculman
                                                  Greetings all, I have a Hennessy SS, and have tried many variations, except the expense of down quilts (yet... $$$). Two space blankets, taped together are
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Aug 23, 2008
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                                                    Greetings all,

                                                    I have a Hennessy SS, and have tried many variations, except the
                                                    expense of down quilts (yet... $$$). Two space blankets, taped
                                                    together are always a must, any time, inserted between the hammock,
                                                    and under cover. Doesn't make a sound, though some small cloth under
                                                    the lower hips is good to absorb a little condensation that will
                                                    collect there. I pull the rain fly down and tuck it in around the
                                                    undercover, in lew of buying an overcover, adds 10 deg to the inside
                                                    temperature.

                                                    For temps down to 32: bib ski pants, puffy polyester vest (not fleece)
                                                    over heavy fleece hooded shirt, Montrail booties, and a 3'x7' fleece
                                                    blanket. These pant/vest/booties stuff down to nothing, and are less
                                                    weight, bulk, and expense. They are a means of very specific
                                                    insulation. (and you can get up at night in the Montrail booties
                                                    without putting on boots)

                                                    I have been out in the mid-teens several times, same configuration.
                                                    Change to a -15 deg Kelty down bag (GearTrade.com = inexpensive).
                                                    Wearing only thermal underware, under whatever pants and shirt I was
                                                    already in and add same booties,(good double socks will work). That's
                                                    it. I stuff my parka, and puffy polyester vest (not fleece) between
                                                    the hammock, and undercover. I would be comfortable with this
                                                    arrangement down to zero, but, will not have that experience to
                                                    report till this winter.

                                                    I have the Hennessy underpad, shoulder pad, and kidney pad, but, they
                                                    do not compress well. Also made a under pad of alumanized bubble
                                                    material, it is excelent too!!! After learning how to use the hammock
                                                    properly, my "under stuff" does not scoot around. I always use a tarp
                                                    of some kind, if there is any breeze or wind, fixed low the the
                                                    ground, the moving air will greatly affect heat retention, ANY time
                                                    of year.

                                                    Link to booties
                                                    http://www.mountaingear.com/pages/product/product.asp/imanf/Montrail/i
                                                    desc/Bivouac+PrimaLoft+Bootie+-+Unisex/Store/MG/item/205284/N/0
                                                    Link to Kelty bag
                                                    http://www.geartrade.com/browse/106/94/181/item/63452

                                                    Anything you might want to know: Hammock Forums.com


                                                    So, not much weight or money, and, a lot of fun! Hope this helped!
                                                  • ypsyculman
                                                    This solved the problem for me of sliding down to the middle of the hammock away from the head end: Set up the hammock so that the HEAD end is LOWER than the
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Aug 23, 2008
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                                                      This solved the problem for me of sliding down to the middle of the
                                                      hammock away from the head end:

                                                      Set up the hammock so that the HEAD end is LOWER than the foot end.
                                                      Three to five inches lower will make a big difference.

                                                      This position will NOT affect your body position in the hammock. You
                                                      will not feel 'head down'. Your body will center more to the head end,
                                                      and, be closer to that end. Also, keep your feet to the right of the
                                                      exit opening, and your shoulders a little to your left, off center,
                                                      thus asymetrical, that's the way Tom made it for us.

                                                      Hope this helps
                                                    • Thomas Vickers
                                                      I use a Feathered Friends Vireo (half bag) and a jacket when I sleep in cold temps. The jacket (integral designs dolomitti) goes over the top of bag. Some day
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Aug 23, 2008
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                                                        I use a Feathered Friends Vireo (half bag) and a jacket when I sleep in cold
                                                        temps. The jacket (integral designs dolomitti) goes over the top of bag.

                                                        Some day I may get a new Vireo and see if FF will put a foot zipper/opening
                                                        in it.

                                                        The benefit is that I only have to wiggle into a bag up to my waist/chest
                                                        and my jacket stays on, even when I have to get up in the night

                                                        TV
                                                      • billybob38801
                                                        Hi Cara, I just went back and read those BGT reviws, and they are truly a mixed bag, even after the addition of the 4 ozs worth of kidney and torso pads. One
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Aug 23, 2008
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                                                          Hi Cara,
                                                          I just went back and read those BGT reviws, and they are truly a mixed
                                                          bag, even after the addition of the 4 ozs worth of kidney and torso
                                                          pads. One 32 years old female from AZ could not be happy below 50*F,
                                                          one 51 y.o. male from NY was OK at 25*F, and one 43y.o. female was
                                                          apparently OK to 0*F, amazingly! "In my previous reports, I noted that
                                                          when out in the teens, I did get a chill when the temps dropped to the
                                                          low teens - 13 F (-11 C). When able to get out and test the
                                                          SuperShelter with the new pads, I did not get any chills -............
                                                          The weather was calm and warm during the summer with some rainy
                                                          nights, and this winter testing has had temperatures that have ranged
                                                          from 26 F (-3 C) to 0 F (-18 C) with heavy snows, some winds (5 to 20
                                                          mph /8 km to 32 km) and some clear, frosty nights. I have woken in
                                                          the morning with snow piled on top of the hammock but did not get any
                                                          moisture inside the hammock. I stayed very warm with the extra pads"

                                                          So, people vary widely in their opinion of SSs, no doubt. Because of
                                                          my own experience, I would say a lot of that is due to a lack of
                                                          knowing how to use it. As with me for instance: Assisted by worse than
                                                          usual brain function due high altitude, combined with not only first
                                                          time in the field with the SS but also first night ever in a HH
                                                          (pretty stupid, eh?), I woke up shivering violently at 0200 and 22*. I
                                                          had to abandon the hammock and just slept under the stars on the
                                                          ground/pad. But I was warm enough after that on the ground, and on the
                                                          following nights and ever sense, I've done a-ok in the SS.

                                                          My terrible first night experience provided some real laughs for my
                                                          ground dwelling fellow hikers! However, after the rest of that trip
                                                          and the one the year after that, they have both converted , to
                                                          hammocks, due to their observations of the two hangers!

                                                          None are using a HH and SS, though. But one, after one try with my
                                                          PeaPod, decided to start with one of those. So we now have two PeaPod
                                                          aficionados here in my small southern town! The other will probably
                                                          use pads. This is a matter of cost along with a preference for top
                                                          loading hammock, so he can't use my HH and SS.

                                                          If it is going to be really cold, mid 20s or below, I will usually
                                                          just grab a PeaPod, it is just easier and more certain and requires
                                                          little expertise. I can take the SS way below 30, but there are quite
                                                          a few
                                                          tricks involved, like extra clothing ( if there is any)down in the UC,
                                                          or a Garlington Insulator.And most of all, avoiding any sag causingthe
                                                          dreaded gap and guaranteed cold. But for now I'm keeping my SS just to
                                                          have something dif to use when it is above 30, and maybe extra windy
                                                          and rainy, or just for fun. You do get a good bit of extra sideways
                                                          rain and wind protection from that sil-nylon under cover, in my
                                                          experience.
                                                          Bill



                                                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
                                                          <cara.lin@...> wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          > Hi Bill,
                                                          >
                                                          > Glad to hear you step in with actual experience with the supershelter.
                                                          > All I knew was the reviews at backpackgeartest.org. I read those,
                                                          > probably in 2006, before deciding on the JRB quilts.
                                                          >
                                                          > CL
                                                          >
                                                          > billybob38801 wrote:
                                                          > > I have a SS that, once I figured out how to use it, has taken me to
                                                          > > the high teens once, using a lot of tricks to get more out of it. But
                                                          > > just as the basic system, I have used it in the 30s a-ok many times.
                                                          > > Now, it's not as convenient to use at really cold temps, as my PeaPod,
                                                          > > which works GREAT!. But it does have it's charms and is a lot cheaper
                                                          > > than a PeaPod. But is certainly has a learning curve, as do most of
                                                          > > these hammock related items.
                                                          > > Bill
                                                          > >
                                                          > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
                                                          > > <cara.lin@> wrote:
                                                          > >> Hennessey doesn't make an underquilt. They make a supershelter and
                                                          > >> underpad system(<http://www.hennessyhammock.com/new-products.html>
                                                          > >> scroll down and look for Supershelter). The problem is, no one
                                                          seems
                                                          > >> happy with it when the temperatures get below 50*F--but that is
                                                          > > based on
                                                          > >> reviews a year ago.
                                                          >
                                                        • Thomas Vickers
                                                          I have hiked with someone who only uses a sleeping bag in his HH and he slept down to 26 comfortably. He might have thrown a thermarest under himself, but he
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Aug 23, 2008
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                                                            I have hiked with someone who only uses a sleeping bag in his HH and he
                                                            slept down to 26 comfortably. He might have thrown a thermarest under
                                                            himself, but he is a bit strange

                                                            tV
                                                          • Cara Lin Bridgman
                                                            Hi Bill, It was for the sideways wind and for splash back (and for bushes and seedlings rubbing on the bottom of my hammock) that I made a outer-quilt (some
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , Aug 24, 2008
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                                                              Hi Bill,

                                                              It was for the sideways wind and for splash back (and for bushes and
                                                              seedlings rubbing on the bottom of my hammock) that I made a outer-quilt
                                                              (some might call it a weathershield, to use the JRB term) out of tyvek.
                                                              Tarptents.com sells a sheet of tyvek as a groundcloth for their
                                                              double-rainbow. It has the perfect dimensions for an outershield for a
                                                              Hennessey hammock (or most any other camping hammock). It also doubles
                                                              well as a ground cloth if I have to go to ground or sleep on the shelves
                                                              in shelters. Plus, I've found I rather like the feel of tyvek!

                                                              So, I bought a length of tyvek and sewed some hot pink mason's twine
                                                              through the ends (folded over once) to make an outer-quilt that covers
                                                              my JRB nest. It also add some extra warmth by blocking wind.

                                                              One of the criticisms I read at backbackgeartest.org about the
                                                              supershelter was that it had a tendency to blow open. I've found that I
                                                              actually prefer to keep my nest velcroed shut (waste of velcro and
                                                              weight, may as well remove the velcro and sew it shut...) and get in and
                                                              out of the HH by swinging that (and sometimes the tyvek) out of the way.
                                                              The tyvek not only helps block wind, but it also helps make sure the
                                                              nest stays velcroed shut.

                                                              I guess I'm a little worried about condensation with a silnylon
                                                              undercover like the supershelter. I tried the garlington taco with
                                                              mylar and a few other things and the non-breathable things definitely
                                                              got puddles of condensation. I've not noticed any with the tyvek.

                                                              Also, I'm still leary of using the silnylon as a groundcloth type thing.
                                                              In my mind, it's rather fragile. The tyvek seems so much more sturdy
                                                              (especially after the hour or so it took me thread string through the
                                                              ends and after it blunted needle).

                                                              I probably gave more weight to the unhappy-with-cold review, because I
                                                              tend to sleep cold.

                                                              CL

                                                              billybob38801 wrote:
                                                              > Hi Cara,
                                                              > I just went back and read those BGT reviws, and they are truly a mixed
                                                              > bag, even after the addition of the 4 ozs worth of kidney and torso
                                                              > pads. One 32 years old female from AZ could not be happy below 50*F,
                                                              > one 51 y.o. male from NY was OK at 25*F, and one 43y.o. female was
                                                              > apparently OK to 0*F, amazingly!
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