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Re: [Hammock Camping] Hennessy vs Clark vs ?

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  • Neal
    You know the more that I look at the site, the better I like it. The double bottom is really nice. I am looking at the the expedition with the diamond fly
    Message 1 of 26 , Jun 26, 2008
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      You know the more that I look at the site, the better I like it. The
      double bottom is really nice. I am looking at the the expedition with
      the diamond fly option. The last time I used my Pack'N'Go hammock, it
      was with a rectangular fly stretched diagonally. I only noticed slight
      cold spots on the bottom. Has anyone ever used the White foam for
      packaging furniture as a lightweight summer insulation? A good size
      weighs only 50 grams.

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chinell, David F (GE EntSol,
      Security)" <david.chinell@...> wrote:
      >
      > Neal:
      >
      > I feel like a broken record about this, but I always recommend Mosquito
      > Hammocks. I like the Expedition model best, but have one or two of each
      > model.
      >
      > www.mosquitohammock.com
      >
      > They are the best of all worlds in a pre-made hammock AFAIC.
      >
      > You have a built-in mosquito net, but you can flip the whole thing over
      > and lounge around on an open hammock during the day.
      >
      > Bear
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Cara Lin Bridgman
      My husband uses that sort of white foam all the time! It s sold in Taiwan for use as sleeping pads and tent floor liners. It comes with a silver-mylar-like
      Message 2 of 26 , Jun 26, 2008
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        My husband uses that sort of white foam all the time! It's sold in
        Taiwan for use as sleeping pads and tent floor liners. It comes with a
        silver-mylar-like coating on one side and is surprisingly durable.

        CL

        Neal wrote:
        > Has anyone ever used the White foam for
        > packaging furniture as a lightweight summer insulation? A good size
        > weighs only 50 grams.
      • Tom Frazier
        That s true...the mosquito netting has done just fine...we ve got these strange little biters in the summer months that could get through the netting, but
        Message 3 of 26 , Jun 26, 2008
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          That's true...the mosquito netting has done just fine...we've got these strange little biters in the summer months that could get through the netting, but they, curiously, don't jump that high so I just hang my hammock up a little higher than I usually do and I'm fine.

          Last weekend's campout in the mountains (had clouds hitting me on the ridgeline, pouring rain, hot blistering days, and intermittent strong winds coupled with hauntingly calm) I actually sweated in my JH (used reflectivix pad) and I did notice the lingering smell of night sweat soaked up in the polyester...once sufficiently aired out, though, it was just fine...my sleeping bag held on to the odors in the same way...not too big of a deal once dried out in sunlight. ;o)




          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Cara Lin Bridgman
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2008 5:48 AM
          Subject: [Hammock Camping] Mosquito Hammock, was Hennessy vs Clark vs ?


          That double-bottom is also important for keeping off mosquitoes.
          According to the Hennessey Hammock website, mosquitoes have a seriously
          hard time biting through two layers of cloth. When it's really hot out,
          we're not going to be interested in insulation or wearing more clothing
          than we have to. A double-bottom will be cooler than a full outfit of
          long sleeved shirts, long pants, and socks. Also, when it's really hot
          out and if you don't need to worry about the micro-sized biters, then
          the mosquito netting of the mosquito hammock will allow a whole lot more
          air circulation than the no-see-um netting of other hammocks.

          My only concern with the polyester in the Mosquito Hammocks is that
          polyester tends to retain odor faster, more penetratingly, and longer
          than nylon.

          CL

          mrbyer wrote:
          > And don't forget the double bottom to put a pad. Great feature.
          >
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Frazier" <wildewudu@...>
          > wrote:
          >> I agree...I think they are a pretty good deal, even though they're
          > now $150 each...but you get not only a hammock with a spreadable
          > mosquito netting (it isn't no-see-um netting) and a ykk zippered
          > entrance, but a camo. diamond shaped tarp to go with it.





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        • Neal
          Dave et al After carefully comparing all of the options between the 3 choices Mosquito Hammock, Hennessy Expedition and the Clark Hammock I chose the Mosquito
          Message 4 of 26 , Jun 28, 2008
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            Dave et al

            After carefully comparing all of the options between the 3 choices
            Mosquito Hammock, Hennessy Expedition and the Clark Hammock I chose
            the Mosquito Hammock and the Diamond Fly. Reason # 1 was the flat
            double "floor", Reason # 2 was reports of stuff falling out of the
            entrance of the hennessy. #3 As much as I like Velcro, It does tend to
            get dirty/gunked up after a while. #4 Those pockets on the Clark
            website REALLY look busy. The perfect dirt catcher. Also they only
            "Insulate" in the Arse area in the lightweight one. # 5 The straps on
            the Mosquito are easily removable and an extra Knot and tree hugger
            straps are not needed as with the other two. I wonder why the Mosquito
            Hammock doesn't sew a loop on one end of each strap.

            Thanks to all for the great informationNeal


            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chinell, David F (GE EntSol,
            Security)" <david.chinell@...> wrote:
            >
            > Neal:
            >
            > I feel like a broken record about this, but I always recommend Mosquito

            > www.mosquitohammock.com
            >
            > Bear
          • Chinell, David F (GE EntSol, Security)
            Neal: Here s another bonus. When you get your Mosquito Hammock, you ll roll it out on the floor and have a geez moment when you realize it s just three
            Message 5 of 26 , Jun 30, 2008
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              Neal:

              Here's another bonus. When you get your Mosquito Hammock, you'll roll it
              out on the floor and have a "geez" moment when you realize it's just
              three layers of fabric with a casing at either end and a zipper on one
              side. (Well, not quite that simple, but utterly no fancy cuts or
              curves.)

              You may be encouraged to try making your own after all. If you fold and
              tie the ends, you don't even have to sew. You can see my attempt at
              improving on Tom Claytor's design in my images folder (Photos > Bear's
              Pix). I call it my "Dream Hammock" so all the pictures are prefixed with
              "DH."

              I sewed a casing (rather my sweetie-pie did) but there's no reason why
              you couldn't fold and tie layers. I'm going to do that next time I get
              ambitious.

              Bear




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Brian H
              I just came across a couple pounds of down/feather mix (probably 500 fill). My thought is to use some of my Wally World $1/yd 1.1 oz ripstop and sew up a
              Message 6 of 26 , Jul 1, 2008
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                I just came across a couple pounds of down/feather mix (probably 500 fill).
                My thought is to use some of my Wally World $1/yd 1.1 oz ripstop and sew up
                a summer quilt.

                The final dimensions ideally will be 76x48, with an omni tape and drawstring
                footbox. This is for use in a spear type hammock.

                My question to the group is, how much additional length/width should I allow
                for, knowing that I will lose some with the sewn through design, and about
                how far apart should the down channels be?

                Thanks,

                Brian H
                Folsom, CA
              • tim garner
                  I m no expert on quilt making, but I d guess that the loss of length wouldn t be much because of the sewn through construction, but I d allow for at least 2
                Message 7 of 26 , Jul 2, 2008
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                    I'm no expert on quilt making, but I'd guess that the loss of length wouldn't be much because of the sewn through construction, but I'd allow for at least 2 or 3".
                     I do know that it would be better to end up w/ an extra inch or two rather than coming up short in width/length.  
                   
                     Again, I'm not the expert, but I'd say no more than about 8" wide baffles. If they are to wide, there's not enough control of the down, allowing thick & thin spots. ...Tim 


                  don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!

                  --- On Tue, 7/1/08, Brian H <bhonnold@...> wrote:

                  From: Brian H <bhonnold@...>
                  Subject: [Hammock Camping] Sewn Through Down Quilt
                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, July 1, 2008, 2:55 PM

                  I just came across a couple pounds of down/feather mix (probably 500 fill).
                  My thought is to use some of my Wally World $1/yd 1.1 oz ripstop and sew up
                  a summer quilt.

                  The final dimensions ideally will be 76x48, with an omni tape and drawstring
                  footbox. This is for use in a spear type hammock.

                  My question to the group is, how much additional length/width should I allow
                  for, knowing that I will lose some with the sewn through design, and about
                  how far apart should the down channels be?

                  Thanks,

                  Brian H
                  Folsom, CA


                  ------------------------------------

                  Yahoo! Groups Links






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Neal
                  My Mosquito Hammock came in the mail and I tried it out last night. I threw it up with some crappy knots. It was pitch dark but the knots held well. I think
                  Message 8 of 26 , Jul 14, 2008
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                    My Mosquito Hammock came in the mail and I tried it out last night. I
                    threw it up with some crappy knots. It was pitch dark but the knots
                    held well. I think the straps were the reason. It comes with these
                    "military style" looking straps that had hardly any stretch at all.
                    The hammock that I had previously bound me at the shoulders. The MH
                    didn't at all. This is one sweet hammock with very simple
                    construction. It does weigh in a little bit heavy at 1560 grams (3 lbs
                    7oz) with the diamond tarp but is pretty rugged. The fly really covers
                    well.I am one happy camper. Thanks Tom Claytor for a really superb
                    product.
                  • billybob38801
                    I would also like to add about the Claytor No Net version: What ever the benefits or drawbacks of these particular hammocks might be, one advantage is that the
                    Message 9 of 26 , Jul 14, 2008
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                      I would also like to add about the Claytor No Net version: What ever
                      the benefits or drawbacks of these particular hammocks might be, one
                      advantage is that the Speer PeaPod works superbly with this hammock,
                      even better than it does with most top loaders. I believe that is only
                      because it is a more narrow hammock than most. Again, whatever the
                      overall benefits or negatives of a more narrow hammmock might be, it
                      allows the PeaPod to lay down on the top of my body pretty much as if
                      I was on the ground in a down sleeping bag. IOW, there is little or no
                      air space above my body- caused by the hammock sides holding the Pod
                      above your body- that needs to be filled with a top quilt. Although,
                      this will vary a bit depending on the amount of sag you hand the
                      hammock with. But it always works good!

                      In addition, for whatever reason, the bottom layer seems extra easy to
                      adjust so that it is just barely in contact with my while still
                      maintaining FULL loft. This is one warm, easy to use combo!

                      All of these hammocks have their pros and cons, and I don't like
                      everything about the Claytor NN, though it is one of my favorite
                      hammocks overall. But I just thought I would point out, for those
                      considering one of these hammocks, how GREAT it works with the already
                      wonderful PeaPod. I also have a Claytor jungle. and it works as well
                      with it if you turn the Claytor over, though I'm not yet sure I like
                      the feel of the JH as well once it is turned upside down. But it will
                      work.

                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Neal" <nealaustin@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > My Mosquito Hammock came in the mail and I tried it out last night. I
                      > threw it up with some crappy knots. It was pitch dark but the knots
                      > held well. I think the straps were the reason. It comes with these
                      > "military style" looking straps that had hardly any stretch at all.
                      > The hammock that I had previously bound me at the shoulders. The MH
                      > didn't at all. This is one sweet hammock with very simple
                      > construction. It does weigh in a little bit heavy at 1560 grams (3 lbs
                      > 7oz) with the diamond tarp but is pretty rugged. The fly really covers
                      > well.I am one happy camper. Thanks Tom Claytor for a really superb
                      > product.
                      >
                    • Tom Frazier
                      The Claytor mosquito hammock *is* nice....I got one earlier this year and have used it on many, many camping trips since. I don t really have any complaints,
                      Message 10 of 26 , Jul 14, 2008
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                        The Claytor mosquito hammock *is* nice....I got one earlier this year and have used it on many, many camping trips since. I don't really have any complaints, but I do intend on replacing those ropes. Just last night I was hanging in the mountains between two trees that were a little too far apart, so I had to improvise between some 3' ft. tree hugger straps (held together with loops on the ends and a carabiner) and tying the jungle hammock (the version I have) off onto the carabiners.

                        Outside of the ideal 10' to 15' foot range, the ropes will tend to stretch like a spring. You'll notice very shortly that small fibers will start to separate (i.e. get "fuzzy") and the ropes will start sticking to the tree trunks you're tying to. I'm going to remedy this by using a cinch buckle and a 1" inch wide strap (climbing grade)....that should remedy both the issue with fraying and sticking to the tree trunks as well as the "stretch" of the stock ropes...plus, using the cinch buckles, I only have to worry about one strap for each side and can put them in their own bag (ropes tend to collect pine sap and other things I don't want on my hammock) as well as the benefit of an easy adjustment method using the cinch buckles.

                        I love this hammock, though! It took me some time to get used to camping and sleeping in a hammock, but now that I've used it so much I fall asleep rather quickly and get some really good quality sleep out where I'd normally be sleeping on rocks and fallen branches. Hammocks are defininately the way to go! I just need to get my two kids and my wife set up now. ;o)




                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Neal
                        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Monday, July 14, 2008 8:07 AM
                        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Hennessy vs Clark vs Mosquito Hammock


                        My Mosquito Hammock came in the mail and I tried it out last night. I
                        threw it up with some crappy knots. It was pitch dark but the knots
                        held well. I think the straps were the reason. It comes with these
                        "military style" looking straps that had hardly any stretch at all.
                        The hammock that I had previously bound me at the shoulders. The MH
                        didn't at all. This is one sweet hammock with very simple
                        construction. It does weigh in a little bit heavy at 1560 grams (3 lbs
                        7oz) with the diamond tarp but is pretty rugged. The fly really covers
                        well.I am one happy camper. Thanks Tom Claytor for a really superb
                        product.






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                      • ptoddf
                        Is the consensus that the mosquito NN is MORE comfortable and roomier feeling than the Speer, for those that are commenting here? Excellent info on the
                        Message 11 of 26 , Jul 15, 2008
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                          Is the consensus that the mosquito NN is MORE comfortable and roomier
                          feeling than the Speer, for those that are commenting here?

                          Excellent info on the mosquito, a new item to me with this thread. I
                          have one of the fabulous and unique PeaPods, but the stock Speer
                          hammock could be more comfortable for me. Reports here that it fits
                          the mosquito NN has me about to order.

                          I also have a Hennessey that I almost never use. I was thinking of
                          cutting the net off and trying it with the Pea Pod, after making the
                          ridgeline detachable, but the mosquito sounds better. Maybe I can
                          sell my HH to someone who needs a full time bug net.

                          The Hennessey is a brilliant piece of design, no doubt, but I don't
                          want a bug net between me and the stars except when it's absolutely
                          necessary, rare to never in California high desert and Sierra. I do
                          like a hammock ridge line so I can hang stuff off it, but that's
                          easily added to an open style hammock.

                          I modified my MacCat fly to furl down to it's own ridge line/support
                          rope using HH "snake skins". This makes an independently tied, fat
                          ridgeline higher above the hammock. Same deal -- little or no
                          interference with sky views, with air or with easy in and out of the
                          hammock. I unfurl the fly and drop the attached cords and captive
                          stakes down only when weather demands it. Like when the stars go out
                          because of heavy rain clouds.

                          Best, Todd F.
                        • Chinell, David F (GE EntSol, Security)
                          Tom and all: Don t forget to tie higher up on trees that are farther apart. I was utterly baffled at the different stretch performance I was getting out of
                          Message 12 of 26 , Jul 17, 2008
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                            Tom and all:

                            Don't forget to tie higher up on trees that are farther apart. I was
                            utterly baffled at the different "stretch" performance I was getting out
                            of the same polyester webbing until I realized there was a substantial
                            difference in the space between my test trees and the forest trees I
                            generally use.

                            Changing the angle changes the tension you put on the straps.

                            Bear


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Tom Frazier
                            I m going to switch to 1 climbing straps to prevent any stretch, but mostly so I can use the cinch buckles to make adjustments a cinch. ;o) I ve only sagged
                            Message 13 of 26 , Jul 17, 2008
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                              I'm going to switch to 1" climbing straps to prevent any stretch, but mostly so I can use the cinch buckles to make adjustments a cinch. ;o)

                              I've only sagged once, and the reason was because the two trees I tied to were *really* far apart. I even had to use tree hugger straps just to cover the distance! I'm going to eliminate the need for having extra straps and instead of two cords I'll just have one strap to put a rain diverting felt cloth onto.

                              I noticed, though, that I do like the tauter tie rather than having moderate to severe sag. Though, I think that has mostly to do with the fact that the Claytor JH is only 3' wide, so you can't angle yourself at a severe angle to lay flat like you'd be able to with a wider hammock.

                              Tom



                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Chinell, David F (GE EntSol, Security)
                              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Thursday, July 17, 2008 1:03 PM
                              Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: Hennessy vs Clark vs Mosquito Hammock


                              Tom and all:

                              Don't forget to tie higher up on trees that are farther apart. I was
                              utterly baffled at the different "stretch" performance I was getting out
                              of the same polyester webbing until I realized there was a substantial
                              difference in the space between my test trees and the forest trees I
                              generally use.

                              Changing the angle changes the tension you put on the straps.

                              Bear

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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                            • mrbyer
                              I also noticed that I am much flatter with a less diagonal lie in the Claytor when compared to my other hammocks ... moderate to severe sag. Though, I think
                              Message 14 of 26 , Jul 18, 2008
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                                I also noticed that I am much flatter with a less diagonal lie in the
                                Claytor when compared to my other hammocks

                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Frazier" <wildewudu@...>
                                wrote:

                                > I noticed, though, that I do like the tauter tie rather than having
                                moderate to severe sag. Though, I think that has mostly to do with
                                the fact that the Claytor JH is only 3' wide, so you can't angle
                                yourself at a severe angle to lay flat like you'd be able to with a
                                wider hammock.
                                >
                                > Tom
                                >
                                >
                              • wisedove_wisedove
                                Did you say you might want to sell your HH? I am interested... what model would you be selling? I have two, but need a third for my son... grown boy, 185 lbs
                                Message 15 of 26 , Aug 3, 2008
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                                  Did you say you might want to sell your HH? I am interested... what
                                  model would you be selling? I have two, but need a third for my
                                  son... grown boy, 185 lbs at least.
                                  Dove --
                                  - In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ptoddf" <ptoddf@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Is the consensus that the mosquito NN is MORE comfortable and
                                  roomier
                                  > feeling than the Speer, for those that are commenting here?
                                  >
                                  > Excellent info on the mosquito, a new item to me with this thread.
                                  I
                                  > have one of the fabulous and unique PeaPods, but the stock Speer
                                  > hammock could be more comfortable for me. Reports here that it fits
                                  > the mosquito NN has me about to order.
                                  >
                                  > I also have a Hennessey that I almost never use. I was thinking of
                                  > cutting the net off and trying it with the Pea Pod, after making
                                  the
                                  > ridgeline detachable, but the mosquito sounds better. Maybe I can
                                  > sell my HH to someone who needs a full time bug net.
                                  >
                                  > The Hennessey is a brilliant piece of design, no doubt, but I don't
                                  > want a bug net between me and the stars except when it's absolutely
                                  > necessary, rare to never in California high desert and Sierra. I do
                                  > like a hammock ridge line so I can hang stuff off it, but that's
                                  > easily added to an open style hammock.
                                  >
                                  > I modified my MacCat fly to furl down to it's own ridge
                                  line/support
                                  > rope using HH "snake skins". This makes an independently tied, fat
                                  > ridgeline higher above the hammock. Same deal -- little or no
                                  > interference with sky views, with air or with easy in and out of
                                  the
                                  > hammock. I unfurl the fly and drop the attached cords and captive
                                  > stakes down only when weather demands it. Like when the stars go
                                  out
                                  > because of heavy rain clouds.
                                  >
                                  > Best, Todd F.
                                  >
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