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RE: [Hammock Camping] 5 Days of granola bars and tunafish!!

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  • David Fox
    Try looking at Trailplace.com or USTrailwalker.com or whiteblaze.com They all have scads of info. From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
    Message 1 of 9 , May 20 4:16 AM
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      Try looking at Trailplace.com or USTrailwalker.com or whiteblaze.com They
      all have scads of info.



      From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of Andrew Buskov
      Sent: Monday, May 19, 2008 10:23 PM
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com; backpackingtalk@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] 5 Days of granola bars and tunafish!!



      Not sure that this belongs in this group. I'd suggest the BackpackingTalk
      group. However, my suggestion is to take a look at the Freezerbagcooking
      .com. If you can get these guys interested in lightweight food, that tastes
      good, that's easy to cook, with little to no cleanup, then you'll have a
      killer time prepping for the trip. With projects ranging from dehydrating,
      to making a cozy, and even down to making your own alcohol stove, there are
      a number of projects to keep them occupied.

      BTW. I cross posted, so I'd suggest all further communication take place in
      the other forum.

      AB

      _____

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      Blogging about BackpackGearTest.org, Firefighting, Linux, Hiking and more!

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      ____________________________

      Hello everyone. I need some ideas. We have almost 20 scouts ranging in
      age from 13 to 18 hiking for 5 days on the AT in July. We just did a 2
      day backpacking trip, and you would not believe the food some of these
      guys brought with them. On kid ate nothing but peanut butter. 2 Jars,
      one spoon. Another kid brought a pack of hotdogs....Nothing else. So,
      keeping in mind that these boys have to buy the food themselves, prep
      it, and cook it on the trail. What are some fun ideas that will keep
      them from starving, and they can afford.

      Ralph.
      Troop 14 Griffin Ga.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tod Massa
      Ralph, We took our venture crew (same age group as you describe) from Pen-Mar to Harpers Ferry in March. About 45 miles in 4 days. Our strategy was to break
      Message 2 of 9 , May 20 6:27 AM
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        Ralph,

        We took our venture crew (same age group as you describe) from Pen-Mar to Harpers Ferry in March. About 45 miles in 4 days. Our strategy was to break into small groups for meals, one adult per group since we would always be in the same place for meals and thus observing two-deep leadership at all times.

        This strategy allowed us to ensure that meals were always appropriate because of adequate guidance. In preparation for developing the menus, we sent the boys to cooking and food forums whiteblaze.net and and to wander the supermarkets. Oatmeal works well for breakfast on cold/cool days, with nuts and dried fruits. Summer sausage, pepperoni, other hard meats with cheese and flat breads or tortillas work well at lunch, and dinners often relied on ramen, pasta, noodle or rice meals (Zatarains, liptons, etc) with foil packages of chicken, tuna, or salmon. McCormick sauce mixes (stroganoff, spaghetti sauces,e tc) can all work well with ramen , foil-packed meats, powdered milk or freeze-dried tomato paste, whatever is appropriate to the recipe. Our guys are all competent cooks since we have an annual cooking competition campout, so we know they can cook.

        Harmony House Foods (http://www.harmonyhousefoods.com/) has lots of good freeze dried and dehydrated foods, including chili and stew mixes which are excellent for backpacking. However, they are incredibly healthy and may need to be supplemented with meat, salt and fat depending on the conditions.

        Instant pudding also works well at night.

        There really is no reason not to teach these boys to eat well on the trail. When they are on their own they can live off snicker bars and ramen all they want...but they will have at least made an informed choice.

        -Tod


        ______________________________________________________________________________
        Ain't got no mo' mojo, but I got plenty o' banjo.



        ----- Original Message ----
        From: thomassen_ralph <thomassen_ralph@...>
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, May 19, 2008 11:09:14 PM
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] 5 Days of granola bars and tunafish!!


        Hello everyone. I need some ideas. We have almost 20 scouts ranging in
        age from 13 to 18 hiking for 5 days on the AT in July. We just did a 2
        day backpacking trip, and you would not believe the food some of these
        guys brought with them. On kid ate nothing but peanut butter. 2 Jars,
        one spoon. Another kid brought a pack of hotdogs....Nothing else. So,
        keeping in mind that these boys have to buy the food themselves, prep
        it, and cook it on the trail. What are some fun ideas that will keep
        them from starving, and they can afford.

        Ralph.
        Troop 14 Griffin Ga.
      • C C Wayah
        Ralph, First I d break up that trip up into smaller groups to lessen the impact on the trial. Seeing their terrible diet on the first trip. I d recommend pop
        Message 3 of 9 , May 20 7:19 PM
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          Ralph,
          First I'd break up that trip up into smaller groups to lessen the impact on
          the trial.
          Seeing their terrible diet on the first trip.
          I'd recommend pop tarts for breakfast just to be sure they eat a energy
          breakfast and hot chocolate or tang?. .Gorp with nuts and dried fruit and
          M&M's for snacks or granola bars. Actually peanut butter is a hiker staple.
          Since your going in July add plenty of Gatorade for the inevitable
          dehydration in the heat of July. .
          Mac and cheese etc for supper? Nothing too complicated.
          Perhaps if you did some nutrition type backpacking cooking classes between
          now and then the kids might beef up their diet a bit and eat better. Many
          use hard boiled eggs, string cheese rolled in burritos, to supplement the
          poor diet while on the trial.
          Making a set nutritional menu is a mistake as kids these days are junk food
          addicts and don't know how to eat
          so if you set them up with good for them meals some just might throw it in
          the bushes and not eat. .
          Ask the kids what they want/like to eat and then use that list to tweak
          their diet as best you can.
          Powdered breakfast food is also a good one most kids will drink. Smores at
          least once is always a winner.
          And yes there's the ever popular Snickers.
          There's also the choice of prepackaged oriental Thai or other noodles to
          just add boiling water too some come with a bit of veggies in them. Denty
          Moore stew,
          I've done the menu for youth groups going camping in a farmer's filed and it
          can get rough to satisfy every one..
          However most of the kids were vegetarians so were used to veggies and salads
          every day.

          Rogene






          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "thomassen_ralph" <thomassen_ralph@...>
          To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, May 19, 2008 11:09 PM
          Subject: [Hammock Camping] 5 Days of granola bars and tunafish!!


          > Hello everyone. I need some ideas. We have almost 20 scouts ranging in
          > age from 13 to 18 hiking for 5 days on the AT in July. We just did a 2
          > day backpacking trip, and you would not believe the food some of these
          > guys brought with them. On kid ate nothing but peanut butter. 2 Jars,
          > one spoon. Another kid brought a pack of hotdogs....Nothing else. So,
          > keeping in mind that these boys have to buy the food themselves, prep
          > it, and cook it on the trail. What are some fun ideas that will keep
          > them from starving, and they can afford.
          >
          > Ralph.
          > Troop 14 Griffin Ga.
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Mike S.
          Hello Ralph Here is a website that lets you download an e-book on light weight backpacking techniques written by a scoutmaster and used by his troop. I hope
          Message 4 of 9 , May 21 6:02 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Hello Ralph
            Here is a website that lets you download an e-book on light weight backpacking techniques written by a scoutmaster and used by his troop. I hope this will help and good luck with your troop and their hike
            Mike S.
            assistant SM
            troop 84
            Hornersville, Mo.

            http://www.kuffelcreek.com/new_release.htm


            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.comFrom: ccwayah@...: Tue, 20 May 2008 22:19:22 -0400Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] 5 Days of granola bars and tunafish!!




            Ralph,First I'd break up that trip up into smaller groups to lessen the impact on the trial.Seeing their terrible diet on the first trip.I'd recommend pop tarts for breakfast just to be sure they eat a energy breakfast and hot chocolate or tang?. .Gorp with nuts and dried fruit and M&M's for snacks or granola bars. Actually peanut butter is a hiker staple.Since your going in July add plenty of Gatorade for the inevitable dehydration in the heat of July. .Mac and cheese etc for supper? Nothing too complicated.Perhaps if you did some nutrition type backpacking cooking classes between now and then the kids might beef up their diet a bit and eat better. Many use hard boiled eggs, string cheese rolled in burritos, to supplement the poor diet while on the trial.Making a set nutritional menu is a mistake as kids these days are junk food addicts and don't know how to eatso if you set them up with good for them meals some just might throw it in the bushes and not eat. .Ask the kids what they want/like to eat and then use that list to tweak their diet as best you can.Powdered breakfast food is also a good one most kids will drink. Smores at least once is always a winner.And yes there's the ever popular Snickers.There's also the choice of prepackaged oriental Thai or other noodles to just add boiling water too some come with a bit of veggies in them. Denty Moore stew,I've done the menu for youth groups going camping in a farmer's filed and it can get rough to satisfy every one..However most of the kids were vegetarians so were used to veggies and salads every day.Rogene----- Original Message ----- From: "thomassen_ralph" <thomassen_ralph@...>To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>Sent: Monday, May 19, 2008 11:09 PMSubject: [Hammock Camping] 5 Days of granola bars and tunafish!!> Hello everyone. I need some ideas. We have almost 20 scouts ranging in> age from 13 to 18 hiking for 5 days on the AT in July. We just did a 2> day backpacking trip, and you would not believe the food some of these> guys brought with them. On kid ate nothing but peanut butter. 2 Jars,> one spoon. Another kid brought a pack of hotdogs....Nothing else. So,> keeping in mind that these boys have to buy the food themselves, prep> it, and cook it on the trail. What are some fun ideas that will keep> them from starving, and they can afford.>> Ralph.> Troop 14 Griffin Ga.>>> ------------------------------------>> Yahoo! Groups Links>>>






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          • Chuck Henderson
            I took my scout troop on a 5 day trip through Algonquin Park two years ago i used a variety of dried stuff that i got at the bulk food store in town. then I
            Message 5 of 9 , May 24 12:45 PM
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              I took my scout troop on a 5 day trip through Algonquin Park two years
              ago i used a variety of dried stuff that i got at the bulk food store
              in town.

              then I discovered freezerbagcooking.com it is so easy and
              nutritious , I actully lived on this stuff when I was living in
              Barracks during my divorce, and I came out well fed.

              I would advise however to cut back on the portions especially the ones
              that call for couscous, that stuff kept on expanding much to the
              amazement of the troop who had a great time eating it and watching it
              fill up the bowl again.
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