Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

A lot to learn!!!

Expand Messages
  • thomassen_ralph
    While preparing to purhcase gear a 50 mile AT hike later this year me and my sons stumbled upon a hammock camping site: Just Jeff s Hiking Page. We were amazed
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 17, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      While preparing to purhcase gear a 50 mile AT hike later this year me
      and my sons stumbled upon a hammock camping site: Just Jeff's Hiking
      Page. We were amazed at what all could be done with so very little
      expense.
      We ran directly to the Walmart down the road and purchased some
      material that I am fairly certain might possibly be ripstop nylon. At
      the very least, if it gets a hole in it it does not come apart. We
      rushed straight home, made some folds, tied some knots, and hung the
      hammocks in the back yard. We then realized that we had made hammocks
      for the 6 year old. Back to Walmart for more material, at this point
      I am pretty glad its only $1/yard. This time, 4 yards worth each!! We
      rushed back home,again, Eureka, we had done it. We were the envy of
      the nighborhood! We threw our hammocks and ropes into our packs, and
      the next weekend we were off. An overnight hike at Franklin Deleanor
      Roosevelt State Park in Warm Springs Georgia. A really fun place with
      lots of history. Some of our scout troop were in tents, one a bivy,
      three brave lads laid on a comforter, and covered up with plastic.
      Not us, we like kings, looking down on all the paeons sleeping on the
      ground. As the sun set and wind picked up I began to remember that
      somewhere I had read that hammocks are hard to insulate. Something to
      do with air space. Luckily we had all packed out sleeping mats out of
      habit. We threw those into our homemade hammocks, and with crappy 40F
      Coleman sleeping bags we were quite comfortable through the night. We
      later found out it was in the mid to high 40's. I woke in the morning
      refreshed, and ready to take on the world. Thanks to all of you that
      have contribuited to the wealth of info on the web regarding hammock
      camping!!
      Ralph, Chandler and Jared.
      Troop 14 Griffin GA
    • Ralph Oborn
      Not us, we like kings, looking down on all the paeons sleeping on the ground. Ahh Yes There is that almost automatic superiority and wel deserved snobbishness
      Message 2 of 18 , Apr 18, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Not us, we like kings, looking down on all the paeons sleeping on the
        ground.



        Ahh Yes

        There is that almost automatic superiority and wel deserved snobbishness of
        those that hang halfway between earth and sky.
        We do love to look down of ground dwellers.

        Ralph Oborn (also with a scout group)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tod Massa
        Pretty cool, eh? I have converted some folks in the troop to hammocks, but can t convince them to make their own. Just Jeff s page is a great resource. Tod
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 18, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Pretty cool, eh? I have converted some folks in the troop to hammocks, but can't convince them to make their own. Just Jeff's page is a great resource.

          Tod

          ______________________________________________________________________________
          Ain't got no mo' mojo, but I got plenty o' banjo.

          ----- Original Message ----
          From: thomassen_ralph <thomassen_ralph@...>
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, April 18, 2008 12:16:39 AM
          Subject: [Hammock Camping] A lot to learn!!!

          While preparing to purhcase gear a 50 mile AT hike later this year me
          and my sons stumbled upon a hammock camping site: Just Jeff's Hiking
          Page. We were amazed at what all could be done with so very little
          expense.
          We ran directly to the Walmart down the road and purchased some
          material that I am fairly certain might possibly be ripstop nylon. At
          the very least, if it gets a hole in it it does not come apart. We
          rushed straight home, made some folds, tied some knots, and hung the
          hammocks in the back yard. We then realized that we had made hammocks
          for the 6 year old. Back to Walmart for more material, at this point
          I am pretty glad its only $1/yard. This time, 4 yards worth each!! We
          rushed back home,again, Eureka, we had done it. We were the envy of
          the nighborhood! We threw our hammocks and ropes into our packs, and
          the next weekend we were off. An overnight hike at Franklin Deleanor
          Roosevelt State Park in Warm Springs Georgia. A really fun place with
          lots of history. Some of our scout troop were in tents, one a bivy,
          three brave lads laid on a comforter, and covered up with plastic.
          Not us, we like kings, looking down on all the paeons sleeping on the
          ground. As the sun set and wind picked up I began to remember that
          somewhere I had read that hammocks are hard to insulate. Something to
          do with air space. Luckily we had all packed out sleeping mats out of
          habit. We threw those into our homemade hammocks, and with crappy 40F
          Coleman sleeping bags we were quite comfortable through the night. We
          later found out it was in the mid to high 40's. I woke in the morning
          refreshed, and ready to take on the world. Thanks to all of you that
          have contribuited to the wealth of info on the web regarding hammock
          camping!!
          Ralph, Chandler and Jared.
          Troop 14 Griffin GA



          Messages in this topic (1) Reply (via web post) | Start a new topic
          Messages | Files | Photos | Links | Database | Polls | Members | Calendar
        • Mark Bayern
          Yep -- a hammock is the only way to sleep when you re in a wooded area! You ve already handled the cool weather -- remember that a sleeping bag will be crushed
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 18, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Yep -- a hammock is the only way to sleep when you're in a wooded area!

            You've already handled the cool weather -- remember that a sleeping
            bag will be crushed to nothingness beneath you. The next thing to
            consider is damage to the trees. If you were using a rope around the
            tree, you might consider a flat strap instead. A round rope
            concentrates the pressure onto a single point (line?) around the tree.
            A strap will distribute the pressure over a larger area. Hennessey
            calls their arrangement 'tree huggers', others use a loosely braided
            rope the flattens out around the tree trunk. Speer hammocks don't use
            any rope just the strapping. Some good pictures are at:
            <http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/Hammock.htm>

            Once you get the straps figured out, there is insect protection,
            protection from the weather ...

            Lots of fun!

            Mark
          • thomassen_ralph
            We just came back from an overnight campout at Providence Canyon State park in SW. 4 more scouts were in hammocks, 2 of them home made. The conditions on this
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 19, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              We just came back from an overnight campout at Providence Canyon
              State park in SW. 4 more scouts were in hammocks, 2 of them home
              made. The conditions on this campout were less than perfect. It only
              took 2 hours of thunderstorm to convince me that my tarp was less
              than perfect to suit my needs. I think that it is simply to small,
              not enough coverage, Aparently washing it in the washing machine to
              remove coca-cola that was spilled on it remove some of its
              waterproofing. It wasn't quite leaky as a sieve, it did manage to
              keep of some hail. I think until I can find sil-nylon that I can
              afford, I will have to stick with a "blue" tarp, or heavy grade
              plastic( we have a huge roll in our scout wagon) We just recently
              aquired 3 miles of mule tape. If you have never heard if it it is a
              5/8" wide strap used by linesmen to pull cable through conduit. This
              stuff has a rated pull strength of 1800 lbs. We have used a section
              to pull a van out of a bad mudhole!!! All this with a very light
              weight. Cool stuff. We hung our hammocks with it this weekend. I am
              proud to say it holds up better to a downpour than I do. I will be
              better prepared next time.

              Ralph, Jared, and Chandler
              Troop 14 Griffin Ga.
            • Ralph Oborn
              We just recently aquired 3 miles of mule tape. If you have never heard if it it is a 5/8 wide strap used by linesmen to pull cable through conduit. This stuff
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 19, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                We just recently
                aquired 3 miles of mule tape. If you have never heard if it it is a
                5/8" wide strap used by linesmen to pull cable through conduit. This
                stuff has a rated pull strength of 1800 lbs. We have used a section
                to pull a van out of a bad mudhole!!! All this with a very light
                weight. Cool stuff. We hung our hammocks with it this weekend. I am
                proud to say it holds up better to a downpour than I do. I will be
                better prepared next time.


                I also have used mule tape, be careful it has a relatively small cross
                section and can harm the bark on a tree,
                You may want to consider something thicker to wrap around the bark.

                Try hanging your blue tarp diagonally to get some extra length out of it.


                Ralph
                ( I used to be an antelopee)


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • thomassen_ralph
                Hey Ralph, Actually both of my sons put their blue tarps up in a diagonal configuration and stayed bone dry. Whats the best solution for keeping your pack dry?
                Message 7 of 18 , Apr 19, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hey Ralph,
                  Actually both of my sons put their blue tarps up in a diagonal
                  configuration and stayed bone dry. Whats the best solution for keeping
                  your pack dry? I put mine in a hefty bag I was saving for clean up on
                  the trail with me the next day. But, I am not gonna always carry a
                  garbage bag on every hike.
                • thomassen_ralph
                  Hey Mark, I can see the the straps on the Speer hammock would be alot easier on the tree, and reduce the chance of a rope slipping dramatically. I have seen
                  Message 8 of 18 , Apr 19, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hey Mark,
                    I can see the the straps on the Speer hammock would be alot easier on
                    the tree, and reduce the chance of a rope slipping dramatically. I
                    have seen some materials like that at the hardware store. I will
                    check that out to see if its strong enough. As far as bugs go, I
                    think its gonna be Deet all the way. One of the reasons I was looking
                    at hammocks for hiking is the fact I have trouble sleeping if I feel
                    closed in. So a bivy sac, or small backpacking tent is out. I like
                    how open they feel. That being said we are canoeing down the Altamaha
                    or Suwannee river later this year. Being way in the swamp, I may need
                    to rethink shelter. I tihnk I may try to make something like the
                    hammock sock for our hammocks.

                    Ralph, Chandler, and Jared
                    Troop 14 Griffin Ga

                    >
                    > Yep -- a hammock is the only way to sleep when you're in a wooded
                    area!
                    >
                    > You've already handled the cool weather -- remember that a sleeping
                    > bag will be crushed to nothingness beneath you. The next thing to
                    > consider is damage to the trees. If you were using a rope around the
                    > tree, you might consider a flat strap instead. A round rope
                    > concentrates the pressure onto a single point (line?) around the
                    tree.
                    > A strap will distribute the pressure over a larger area. Hennessey
                    > calls their arrangement 'tree huggers', others use a loosely braided
                    > rope the flattens out around the tree trunk. Speer hammocks don't
                    use
                    > any rope just the strapping. Some good pictures are at:
                    > <http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/Hammock.htm>
                    >
                    > Once you get the straps figured out, there is insect protection,
                    > protection from the weather ...
                    >
                    > Lots of fun!
                    >
                    > Mark
                    >
                  • Ralph Oborn
                    But, I am not gonna always carry a garbage bag on every hike. Why not? I do. Actually a couple. :] Ralph [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Message 9 of 18 , Apr 19, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      But, I am not gonna always carry a garbage bag on every hike.


                      Why not? I do. Actually a couple. :]

                      Ralph


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Mark Bayern
                      ... But if you don t, what do you do with the trash you pickup off the trail? I usually seem to end up with a bag tied to my belt so I have a place to put the
                      Message 10 of 18 , Apr 20, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        > ... But, I am not gonna always carry a
                        > garbage bag on every hike.

                        But if you don't, what do you do with the trash you pickup off the trail?

                        I usually seem to end up with a bag tied to my belt so I have a place
                        to put the trash I pickup off the trail. This does mean that the first
                        thing I'm looking for at a trailhead is a trash can!

                        Mark
                      • Mark Bayern
                        ... absolutely -- keep in mind they are light and very multi-purpose. Mark
                        Message 11 of 18 , Apr 20, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          >> But, I am not gonna always carry a garbage bag on every hike.
                          >
                          > Why not? I do. Actually a couple. :]

                          absolutely -- keep in mind they are light and very multi-purpose.

                          Mark
                        • thomassen_ralph
                          Mark this weekend we started a new rule for our Troop. We car camped because the park we went to had no backcountry sites for us. After breaking camp on
                          Message 12 of 18 , Apr 20, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Mark this weekend we started a new rule for our Troop. We car camped
                            because the park we went to had no backcountry sites for us. After
                            breaking camp on Saturday we had the Troop divide into their patrols in
                            a straight line. The last scout in line, whammo, trash guy. Had to tote
                            our trash bag the ENTIRE hike. It was only 7 miles so he should not be
                            scarred for life. I would like a nylon hip bag I could put a small
                            liner in to hang from my belt or pack straps. Maybe you could use paper
                            clips to hold the liner tight at the top. I think that is something
                            that I could make that is not out of my league!!!
                            Ralph,Chandler, and Jared.
                            Troop 14 Griffin, Ga.
                            >
                            > > ... But, I am not gonna always carry a
                            > > garbage bag on every hike.
                            >
                            > But if you don't, what do you do with the trash you pickup off the
                            trail?
                            >
                            > I usually seem to end up with a bag tied to my belt so I have a place
                            > to put the trash I pickup off the trail. This does mean that the first
                            > thing I'm looking for at a trailhead is a trash can!
                            >
                            > Mark
                            >
                          • Ralph Oborn
                            On Sat, Apr 19, 2008 at 7:51 PM, thomassen_ralph ... A good source for straps are the motorcycle tie downs. I wouldn t nessarily
                            Message 13 of 18 , Apr 20, 2008
                            • 0 Attachment
                              On Sat, Apr 19, 2008 at 7:51 PM, thomassen_ralph <thomassen_ralph@...>
                              wrote:

                              > Hey Mark,
                              > I can see the the straps on the Speer hammock would be alot easier on
                              > the tree, and reduce the chance of a rope slipping dramatically. I
                              > have seen some materials like that at the hardware store. I will
                              > check that out to see if its strong enough.



                              A good source for straps are the motorcycle tie downs. I wouldn't nessarily
                              trust the tightners and I would remove most of the hooks, but the straps are
                              designed for weight, and are available everywhere.

                              Ralph


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • thomassen_ralph
                              ... nessarily ... straps are ... have busted tightners. I do cable work, so I use them fasten ladders atop the van. So, that will be my plan, tie off the
                              Message 14 of 18 , Apr 20, 2008
                              • 0 Attachment
                                >
                                > A good source for straps are the motorcycle tie downs. I wouldn't
                                nessarily
                                > trust the tightners and I would remove most of the hooks, but the
                                straps are
                                > designed for weight, and are available everywhere.

                                > I did not even think about that, I have 3 sets in the garage that
                                have busted tightners. I do cable work, so I use them fasten ladders
                                atop the van. So, that will be my plan, tie off the hammock with the
                                mule tape, then have the tie downs around the tree. I wil have to work
                                with the ties downs and see if it will take a sheetbend. I know there
                                are other preffered knots, but thescouts ahve to have that one down pat!

                                Thanks Ralph.


                                >
                              • Tom Frazier
                                I always carry grocery bags with me (recycle); mainly, I use them to bag up my food garbage and hang on a tree far from my camp, and take with me when I leave
                                Message 15 of 18 , Apr 20, 2008
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  I always carry grocery bags with me (recycle); mainly, I use them to bag up my food garbage and hang on a tree far from my camp, and take with me when I leave the area. Since I got into hammocking I've been more inclined to use these grocery bags to tie up my boots when I leave them on the ground over the night, and I use them also in my shoes as a vapor barrier method of keeping my feet warm when I don't have enough layers (I put the bags between multiple layers of socks).



                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Mark Bayern
                                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Sunday, April 20, 2008 10:57 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] A lot to learn!!!


                                  > ... But, I am not gonna always carry a
                                  > garbage bag on every hike.

                                  But if you don't, what do you do with the trash you pickup off the trail?

                                  I usually seem to end up with a bag tied to my belt so I have a place
                                  to put the trash I pickup off the trail. This does mean that the first
                                  thing I'm looking for at a trailhead is a trash can!

                                  Mark





                                  ------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                  No virus found in this incoming message.
                                  Checked by AVG.
                                  Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 269.23.2/1387 - Release Date: 4/19/2008 11:31 AM


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Tom Frazier
                                  Certainly more multi-purpose than most pack rain covers. Recyling little grocery bags for use on the trail would be a great way to save space. ... From: Mark
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Apr 20, 2008
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Certainly more multi-purpose than most pack rain covers. Recyling little grocery bags for use on the trail would be a great way to save space.


                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: Mark Bayern
                                    To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Sunday, April 20, 2008 10:59 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] A lot to learn!!!


                                    >> But, I am not gonna always carry a garbage bag on every hike.
                                    >
                                    > Why not? I do. Actually a couple. :]

                                    absolutely -- keep in mind they are light and very multi-purpose.

                                    Mark





                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                    No virus found in this incoming message.
                                    Checked by AVG.
                                    Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 269.23.2/1387 - Release Date: 4/19/2008 11:31 AM


                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • freelanderyx
                                    Another newbie here in the UK. I m looking for a good pattern for a capming hammock but most seem to involve tying bulky knots in the material. Can you guys
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Apr 27, 2008
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Another newbie here in the UK.

                                      I'm looking for a good pattern for a capming hammock but most seem to
                                      involve tying bulky knots in the material.

                                      Can you guys send me some tried and tested patterns that you've used.

                                      Thanks

                                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "thomassen_ralph"
                                      <thomassen_ralph@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > While preparing to purhcase gear a 50 mile AT hike later this year
                                      me
                                      > and my sons stumbled upon a hammock camping site: Just Jeff's
                                      Hiking
                                      > Page. We were amazed at what all could be done with so very little
                                      > expense.
                                      > We ran directly to the Walmart down the road and purchased some
                                      > material that I am fairly certain might possibly be ripstop nylon.
                                      At
                                      > the very least, if it gets a hole in it it does not come apart. We
                                      > rushed straight home, made some folds, tied some knots, and hung
                                      the
                                      > hammocks in the back yard. We then realized that we had made
                                      hammocks
                                      > for the 6 year old. Back to Walmart for more material, at this
                                      point
                                      > I am pretty glad its only $1/yard. This time, 4 yards worth each!!
                                      We
                                      > rushed back home,again, Eureka, we had done it. We were the envy of
                                      > the nighborhood! We threw our hammocks and ropes into our packs,
                                      and
                                      > the next weekend we were off. An overnight hike at Franklin
                                      Deleanor
                                      > Roosevelt State Park in Warm Springs Georgia. A really fun place
                                      with
                                      > lots of history. Some of our scout troop were in tents, one a bivy,
                                      > three brave lads laid on a comforter, and covered up with plastic.
                                      > Not us, we like kings, looking down on all the paeons sleeping on
                                      the
                                      > ground. As the sun set and wind picked up I began to remember that
                                      > somewhere I had read that hammocks are hard to insulate. Something
                                      to
                                      > do with air space. Luckily we had all packed out sleeping mats out
                                      of
                                      > habit. We threw those into our homemade hammocks, and with crappy
                                      40F
                                      > Coleman sleeping bags we were quite comfortable through the night.
                                      We
                                      > later found out it was in the mid to high 40's. I woke in the
                                      morning
                                      > refreshed, and ready to take on the world. Thanks to all of you
                                      that
                                      > have contribuited to the wealth of info on the web regarding
                                      hammock
                                      > camping!!
                                      > Ralph, Chandler and Jared.
                                      > Troop 14 Griffin GA
                                      >
                                    • Tom Frazier
                                      You could follow the same directions you can easily find elsewhere (imrisk, hammockforums.net, speerhammocks.com, etc.), but instead of tying the end knot,
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Apr 27, 2008
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        You could follow the same directions you can easily find elsewhere (imrisk, hammockforums.net, speerhammocks.com, etc.), but instead of tying the end knot, simply sew up a tube on the ends, like what you find on a Claytor (http://www.mosquitohammock.com/images/picJungleHammockEnd.JPG), and reinforce the inside outter edges of this pocket with poly webbing for reinforcement. Sew the heck out of this pocket (see image for example) so that it doesn't come apart on you when you get in (I've had no problems whatsoever with the Claytor's pocket)...then loop your 1" strap through this pocket, wrap it a couple of times around the tree(s) and then attach it to the other end of the strap however you see fit (I'm going to use these on mine: http://www.onrope1.com/store/index.php?p=product&id=118&parent=4 They have a minimum order of 5 now, which isn't a problem for me, since I'll just get 6 so I have enough for the three hammocks my family will be using)...

                                        You can buy reasonably priced kits from Ed Speer, that cost around $70 USD....not bad, considering the digital camo. hammock I'm making for my wife, with all the bells and whistles, is going to cost me around $90 USD in materials, and then I'll need to buy material for a tarp (for now, will probably let my wife use my claytor tarp, since she'll be camping in the summer time with me and won't really need much in the way of a tarp; though, I can fit two hammocks under the speer winter tarp if I don't close it up all the way). Though, you can get a kit from Ed Speer for *both* a hammock and tarp from $99 up to $137 USD, depending upon the size you opt. for (http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/HammockKits.htm).

                                        These Speer kits are substantially more affordable than even the Claytor hammock I ordered, which now costs $150 USD (back in the day they cost only $120), which includes both a hammock and diamond tarp. He also sells all the materials you need to build your own hammock/tarp from scratch at really good prices that beats many competitors selling the same materials.

                                        Good luck!!



                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        From: freelanderyx
                                        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Sunday, April 27, 2008 3:56 AM
                                        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: A lot to learn!!!


                                        Another newbie here in the UK.

                                        I'm looking for a good pattern for a capming hammock but most seem to
                                        involve tying bulky knots in the material.

                                        Can you guys send me some tried and tested patterns that you've used.

                                        Thanks

                                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "thomassen_ralph"
                                        <thomassen_ralph@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > While preparing to purhcase gear a 50 mile AT hike later this year
                                        me
                                        > and my sons stumbled upon a hammock camping site: Just Jeff's
                                        Hiking
                                        > Page. We were amazed at what all could be done with so very little
                                        > expense.
                                        > We ran directly to the Walmart down the road and purchased some
                                        > material that I am fairly certain might possibly be ripstop nylon.
                                        At
                                        > the very least, if it gets a hole in it it does not come apart. We
                                        > rushed straight home, made some folds, tied some knots, and hung
                                        the
                                        > hammocks in the back yard. We then realized that we had made
                                        hammocks
                                        > for the 6 year old. Back to Walmart for more material, at this
                                        point
                                        > I am pretty glad its only $1/yard. This time, 4 yards worth each!!
                                        We
                                        > rushed back home,again, Eureka, we had done it. We were the envy of
                                        > the nighborhood! We threw our hammocks and ropes into our packs,
                                        and
                                        > the next weekend we were off. An overnight hike at Franklin
                                        Deleanor
                                        > Roosevelt State Park in Warm Springs Georgia. A really fun place
                                        with
                                        > lots of history. Some of our scout troop were in tents, one a bivy,
                                        > three brave lads laid on a comforter, and covered up with plastic.
                                        > Not us, we like kings, looking down on all the paeons sleeping on
                                        the
                                        > ground. As the sun set and wind picked up I began to remember that
                                        > somewhere I had read that hammocks are hard to insulate. Something
                                        to
                                        > do with air space. Luckily we had all packed out sleeping mats out
                                        of
                                        > habit. We threw those into our homemade hammocks, and with crappy
                                        40F
                                        > Coleman sleeping bags we were quite comfortable through the night.
                                        We
                                        > later found out it was in the mid to high 40's. I woke in the
                                        morning
                                        > refreshed, and ready to take on the world. Thanks to all of you
                                        that
                                        > have contribuited to the wealth of info on the web regarding
                                        hammock
                                        > camping!!
                                        > Ralph, Chandler and Jared.
                                        > Troop 14 Griffin GA
                                        >






                                        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                        No virus found in this incoming message.
                                        Checked by AVG.
                                        Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 269.23.5/1400 - Release Date: 4/27/2008 9:39 AM


                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.