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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re:Pros and Cons

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  • pure mahem
    For the most part you don t sway unless you want to. A lot of hangers enjoy swaying but to get the hammock to do it continuously it really doesn t happen
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 7 12:26 PM
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      For the most part you don't sway unless you want to. A lot of hangers enjoy swaying but to get the hammock to do it continuously it really doesn't happen unless you tie your self a line to pull on. Only swaying I get is when I get in or when I'm using my hammock as a chair and rock with my legs. I can't recall ever really even being swayed by strong winds but then again I'm not exactly a light weight on the scale.



      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Mary McMonagle <m3sews@...>
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, April 7, 2008 10:54:00 AM
      Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re:Pros and Cons


      > YMMV. Hammock's are not for everyone, even if there are trees. I don't know
      > why not since I love it,
      > Happy hanging!
      > Carey
      I'm on this list for info for DH and ds. I'm one that won't hammock. I
      can't stand the movement, and I don't normally get motion sick. Even
      sleeping under ds, who loves to sway, makes me sick listening to him
      swaying. I do like the protection of his tarp though.

      --
      Sew soon,
      Mary McMonagle
      State College, PA ASG President





      ____________________________________________________________________________________
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    • Tom Frazier
      I purchased a claytor for the exact same reason. Later, I m going to make a claytor-clone or something similar with a few more features that I want (integrated
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 7 3:13 PM
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        I purchased a claytor for the exact same reason. Later, I'm going to make a claytor-clone or something similar with a few more features that I want (integrated underquilt/weathershield); the one thing that I'm disapointed with on the claytor design, and that's the fact that he uses "mosquito" netting and not "no-see-um" netting, which is small enough to keep the little no-see-um bugs away. Though, I've only had mosquitos try to enter the hammock thus far, so no really issues with what I consider one of the few, if only, minor flaw[s] of the claytor.

        Cons? Number one on that list is "cold", for sure. Have to get creative if you're taking a hammock out in anything but nice, warm weather (also depending upon how warm you sleep). The trouble I had with my byer is that the material was oh-so-thin (so it was light to pack!) but that thinness let the cold air sink right into my lower back. Not fun!

        I think that most other cons will be specific to the style of hammock you buy. For example, my byer was only 7 feet long. Waaaay too short for me. My pad--coldweather use--also kept sliding sideways into a completely perpedicular configuration so that my head and my feet were covered in netting. That's another reason why I decided to go ahead with the purchase of the ready-made claytor hammock: it's 9' ft. 9" inches...plenty long enough.

        Hammocking in general...I think a "con" for me is that even though I've been camping since I was 4 years old and worked hard to develop a light 'tent camping' set up, I now have to start from the beginning and learn nearly everything anew. So there's a learning curve associated with hammock camping, as there is with anything new we pick up. Easy way to overcome this is to ask questions, see what others have done, and use the resources at hammockforums.net.

        The second night out with my claytor I was trying to pitch close to my brother's tent and the fire he had made...which made my choices less than perfect. I ended up pitching my SWT part way around the large trees I was tying to. What resulted is the loss of about a foot or two from my ridgeline. Which took about a foot away from my claytor hammock which in turn resulted in the hammock having more sag than I would have liked and I had to angle myself even more than I would have had I actually hung it in a space it would actually fit in...thus, my sides got cold because I ended up hanging off the pad a little bit...I was still able to get to sleep, but I did have to deal with the cold-sides issue...made me envious of those underquilt users out there! I'll get/make one soon enough though!




        ----- Original Message -----
        From: ginohav
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, April 06, 2008 7:08 PM
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Pros and Cons


        Hi,I'm new to this group and love backpacking and stealth camping and
        I've heard all the pros about hammock camping, but what about the cons?
        I've read some people on other sites are worried about bears and flying
        bugs eating you alive in a hammock. I'm thinking of purchasing a clark
        hammock as I don't have the time now for a DIY hammock. Every form of
        camping has it's pro's and con's, lets hear the con's. By the way I've
        had bears come right up to our tent look around then leave, so what's
        the problem others have had or think they might have in a hammock?
        Thanks






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      • Tom Frazier
        The ENO double hammock supposedly allows two-people occupancy, though I haven t read anyone s report on how comfortable that would actually be. I m going to
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 7 3:16 PM
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          The ENO double hammock supposedly allows two-people occupancy, though I haven't read anyone's report on how comfortable that would actually be.

          I'm going to make one for my wife and two children; I had originally thought about a double hammock set up myself, but then it just didn't seem like it would be too comfortable. An adult and an infant maybe...but two adults? Just seems too impracticle to me.



          ----- Original Message -----
          From: david ball
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, April 07, 2008 6:56 AM
          Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Pros and Cons


          I too am totally new to this whole thing, however; I am more excited than a deer tick in a blood bank about it. I do a lot of canoe camping, hosting groups for 3-10 days of 8-12 people. I am always limited by tent spaces as we go down the river. I think hanging will help eliminate some of that, as my space can now be used by guests.

          As I have been investigating, the major drawback for me is my inability to cuddle up with my significant other. We are going to get two hammocks to hang our heads close and get a large rectangular tarp. I get my quarterly bonus Friday and will be ordering a Claytor JH and a Claytor Expedition with the large rectangular rain fly.

          Canoeing, ultra light is not a concern. Even with this "heavier" arrangement our combined weight is less than the Timberline we were using on the ground. We are very excited about hanging and will be headed to Northern Lower Michigan for a 4 day trip on Mother's Day weekend. In the meantime, I wll get some practice at home. Keep the feedback coming, you all and the Hammock Forum have been very helpful to this newbie.

          David

          aka: Canoebie

          ginohav <ginohav@...> wrote:
          Hi,I'm new to this group and love backpacking and stealth camping and
          I've heard all the pros about hammock camping, but what about the cons?
          I've read some people on other sites are worried about bears and flying
          bugs eating you alive in a hammock. I'm thinking of purchasing a clark
          hammock as I don't have the time now for a DIY hammock. Every form of
          camping has it's pro's and con's, lets hear the con's. By the way I've
          had bears come right up to our tent look around then leave, so what's
          the problem others have had or think they might have in a hammock?
          Thanks

          Working for our customers providing personal growth, team building and leadership development through outdoor adventure.

          "In the woods we return to reason and faith...there nothing will befall me, no disgrace, no calamity which nature cannot repair..."

          Ralph Waldo Emerson

          http://www.riverjourneys.org

          David and Cara Lawson Ball
          RiverJourneys Inc.
          70529 Martin Road
          Edwardsburg, MI 49112

          574-535-3623

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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        • Tom Frazier
          I ll second that! It got plenty windy on my last hammocking trip, and I really didn t sway at all. Sometimes I thought I was swaying, and even if I was, it
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 7 3:18 PM
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            I'll second that! It got plenty windy on my last hammocking trip, and I really didn't sway at all. Sometimes I 'thought' I was swaying, and even if I was, it was only a little bit. I'm not that light myself (200 lbs.), so I'm not sure if that had to do with anything. I'll see the proof of the pudding I guess when I stick my three year old overnight in a hammock.




            ----- Original Message -----
            From: pure mahem
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, April 07, 2008 12:26 PM
            Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re:Pros and Cons


            For the most part you don't sway unless you want to. A lot of hangers enjoy swaying but to get the hammock to do it continuously it really doesn't happen unless you tie your self a line to pull on. Only swaying I get is when I get in or when I'm using my hammock as a chair and rock with my legs. I can't recall ever really even being swayed by strong winds but then again I'm not exactly a light weight on the scale.

            ----- Original Message ----
            From: Mary McMonagle <m3sews@...>
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, April 7, 2008 10:54:00 AM
            Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re:Pros and Cons

            > YMMV. Hammock's are not for everyone, even if there are trees. I don't know
            > why not since I love it,
            > Happy hanging!
            > Carey
            I'm on this list for info for DH and ds. I'm one that won't hammock. I
            can't stand the movement, and I don't normally get motion sick. Even
            sleeping under ds, who loves to sway, makes me sick listening to him
            swaying. I do like the protection of his tarp though.

            --
            Sew soon,
            Mary McMonagle
            State College, PA ASG President

            __________________________________________________________
            You rock. That's why Blockbuster's offering you one month of Blockbuster Total Access, No Cost.
            http://tc.deals.yahoo.com/tc/blockbuster/text5.com

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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          • C C Wayah
            Canobie, This option is pricy. I d go this route for general car camping and canoe camping if price was not an issue. This is a triangular suspended tent
            Message 5 of 16 , Apr 7 3:32 PM
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              Canobie,
              This option is pricy.
              I'd go this route for general car camping
              and canoe camping if price was not an issue.
              This is a triangular suspended tent
              system that weights about five
              It hangs above the ground on a platform that is stretched by ratchets
              between three trees.
              http://trease.biz/
              Several models to choose from.
              Rogene


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "david ball" <riverjourneys@...>
              To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, April 07, 2008 9:56 AM
              Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Pros and Cons


              >I too am totally new to this whole thing, however; I am more excited than a
              >deer tick in a blood bank about it. I do a lot of canoe camping, hosting
              >groups for 3-10 days of 8-12 people. I am always limited by tent spaces as
              >we go down the river. I think hanging will help eliminate some of that, as
              >my space can now be used by guests.
              >
              > As I have been investigating, the major drawback for me is my inability
              > to cuddle up with my significant other. We are going to get two hammocks
              > to hang our heads close and get a large rectangular tarp. I get my
              > quarterly bonus Friday and will be ordering a Claytor JH and a Claytor
              > Expedition with the large rectangular rain fly.
              >
              > Canoeing, ultra light is not a concern. Even with this "heavier"
              > arrangement our combined weight is less than the Timberline we were using
              > on the ground. We are very excited about hanging and will be headed to
              > Northern Lower Michigan for a 4 day trip on Mother's Day weekend. In the
              > meantime, I wll get some practice at home. Keep the feedback coming, you
              > all and the Hammock Forum have been very helpful to this newbie.
              >
              > David
              >
              > aka: Canoebie
              >
              > ginohav <ginohav@...> wrote:
              > Hi,I'm new to this group and love backpacking and stealth camping
              > and
              > I've heard all the pros about hammock camping, but what about the cons?
              > I've read some people on other sites are worried about bears and flying
              > bugs eating you alive in a hammock. I'm thinking of purchasing a clark
              > hammock as I don't have the time now for a DIY hammock. Every form of
              > camping has it's pro's and con's, lets hear the con's. By the way I've
              > had bears come right up to our tent look around then leave, so what's
              > the problem others have had or think they might have in a hammock?
              > Thanks
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Working for our customers providing personal growth, team building and
              > leadership development through outdoor adventure.
              >
              >
              > "In the woods we return to reason and faith...there nothing will befall
              > me, no disgrace, no calamity which nature cannot repair..."
              >
              > Ralph Waldo Emerson
              >
              > http://www.riverjourneys.org
              >
              > David and Cara Lawson Ball
              > RiverJourneys Inc.
              > 70529 Martin Road
              > Edwardsburg, MI 49112
              >
              > 574-535-3623
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
            • Billy Chard
              Hey I have a Double ENO and the two person set up is mainly for 2 pal to sit in it. across way. 2 pal in a hammock sleeping is a dif story. I can be done but
              Message 6 of 16 , Apr 7 4:23 PM
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                Hey I have a Double ENO and the two person set up is mainly for 2 pal
                to sit in it. across way.
                2 pal in a hammock sleeping is a dif story. I can be done but its best
                to sleep head to foot.
                My wife and I have take a few naps in it and we were quite
                comply.
                I would love to give you a recent test but my wife is 8 months pregnant.


                It can be done you will just have to get nice and close

                Billy

                -----Original Message-----
                From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tom Frazier
                Sent: Monday, April 07, 2008 6:17 PM
                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Pros and Cons

                The ENO double hammock supposedly allows two-people occupancy, though I
                haven't read anyone's report on how comfortable that would actually be.

                I'm going to make one for my wife and two children; I had originally
                thought about a double hammock set up myself, but then it just didn't
                seem like it would be too comfortable. An adult and an infant
                maybe...but two adults? Just seems too impractical to me.

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: David ball
                To: hammockcamping@ <mailto:hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>
                yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, April 07, 2008 6:56 AM
                Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Pros and Cons

                I too am totally new to this whole thing, however; I am more excited
                than a deer tick in a blood bank about it. I do a lot of canoe camping,
                hosting groups for 3-10 days of 8-12 people. I am always limited by tent
                spaces as we go down the river. I think hanging will help eliminate some
                of that, as my space can now be used by guests.

                As I have been investigating, the major drawback for me is my inability
                to cuddle up with my significant other. We are going to get two hammocks
                to hang our heads close and get a large rectangular tarp. I get my
                quarterly bonus Friday and will be ordering a Clayton JH and a Clayton
                Expedition with the large rectangular rain fly.

                Canoeing, ultra light is not a concern. Even with this "heavier"
                arrangement our combined weight is less than the Timberline we were
                using on the ground. We are very excited about hanging and will be
                headed to Northern Lower Michigan for a 4 day trip on Mother's Day
                weekend. In the meantime, I wall get some practice at home. Keep the
                feedback coming, you all and the Hammock Forum have been very helpful to
                this newbie.

                David

                aqua: Cenobite

                gingham <ginohav@yahoo. <mailto:ginohav%40yahoo.com> com> wrote:
                Hakim's new to this group and love backpacking and stealth camping and
                I've heard all the pros about hammock camping, but what about the cons?
                I've read some people on other sites are worried about bears and flying
                bugs eating you alive in a hammock. I'm thinking of purchasing a Clark
                hammock as I don't have the time now for a DIY hammock. Every form of
                camping has it's pro's and con's, lets hear the con's. By the way I've
                had bears come right up to our tent look around then leave, so what's
                the problem others have had or think they might have in a hammock?
                Thanks

                Working for our customers providing personal growth, team building and
                leadership development through outdoor adventure.

                "In the woods we return to reason and faith...there nothing will befall
                me, no disgrace, no calamity which nature cannot repair..."

                Ralph Waldo Emerson

                http://www.riverjou <http://www.riverjourneys.org> rneys.org

                David and Cara Lawson Ball
                RiverJourneys Inc.
                70529 Martin Road
                Edwardsburg, MI 49112

                574-535-3623

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                ----------------------------------------------------------

                No virus found in this incoming message.
                Checked by AVG.
                Version: 7.5.519 / Virus Database: 269.22.8/1363 - Release Date:
                4/7/2008 8:56 AM

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • gerzson
                ... Last year I went out a lot with beginners and I remember they had this problem. One minute after entering the hammock I was perfectly still but some of
                Message 7 of 16 , Apr 8 1:11 AM
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                  On Mon, Apr 7, 2008 at 10:26 PM, pure mahem <pure_mahem@...> wrote:
                  > For the most part you don't sway unless you want to. A lot of hangers enjoy swaying but to get the hammock to do it continuously it

                  Last year I went out a lot with beginners and I remember they had this problem.
                  One minute after entering the hammock I was perfectly still but some
                  of them seemed to sway harder and harder (involuntarily).
                  One of them even slept on the dirt for this reason.

                  To keep to the subject I'll add my list of cons (already mentioned here):
                  1. the need for trees (or other hanging spots). Even one can get
                  inventive when traveling alone, this can be a problem for a group of
                  hammockers outside of a forest.
                  2. The thermal isolation is less efficient than on the ground.
                  Especially if there is some air movement. Having said this, I have
                  slept in the hammock in -20C temperatures during a light snowstorm
                  without any discomfort.

                  Apart from this two, I didn't found any other cons, but as some said -
                  the hammock camping isn't for anyone.
                  Also I found that in order to be comfortable in the hammock, one must
                  learn to use it (more than with ground sleeping).

                  gerzson
                • Cara Lin Bridgman
                  The Hennessey Hammocks come with side bungies (elastic line) that act to dampen swings. They also spread out the hammock so it doesn t close up around you so
                  Message 8 of 16 , Apr 8 2:51 AM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    The Hennessey Hammocks come with side bungies (elastic line) that act to
                    dampen swings. They also spread out the hammock so it doesn't close up
                    around you so much. With the hammock your DH uses, it should be easy to
                    temporarily attach bungies to see if they help you (they would run from
                    widest part of hammock to the ground). If they do, then you and your
                    husband will have a great system.

                    CL

                    Mary McMonagle wrote:
                    > I'm on this list for info for DH and ds. I'm one that won't hammock. I
                    > can't stand the movement, and I don't normally get motion sick. Even
                    > sleeping under ds, who loves to sway, makes me sick listening to him
                    > swaying. I do like the protection of his tarp though.
                  • Tom Frazier
                    I personally was curious about the double nest as I m trying to get the family into hammocks this summer. ;o) My wife and infant can take a hammock (we have
                    Message 9 of 16 , Apr 8 3:02 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I personally was curious about the double nest as I'm trying to get the family into hammocks this summer. ;o) My wife and infant can take a hammock (we have yet to give this a try, so it's just hypothetical right now), I take another hammock and my three year old gets his own hammock. lol..hopefully I can work something out.


                      Tom



                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Billy Chard
                      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Monday, April 07, 2008 4:23 PM
                      Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Pros and Cons


                      Hey I have a Double ENO and the two person set up is mainly for 2 pal
                      to sit in it. across way.
                      2 pal in a hammock sleeping is a dif story. I can be done but its best
                      to sleep head to foot.
                      My wife and I have take a few naps in it and we were quite
                      comply.
                      I would love to give you a recent test but my wife is 8 months pregnant.

                      It can be done you will just have to get nice and close

                      Billy

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tom Frazier
                      Sent: Monday, April 07, 2008 6:17 PM
                      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Pros and Cons

                      The ENO double hammock supposedly allows two-people occupancy, though I
                      haven't read anyone's report on how comfortable that would actually be.

                      I'm going to make one for my wife and two children; I had originally
                      thought about a double hammock set up myself, but then it just didn't
                      seem like it would be too comfortable. An adult and an infant
                      maybe...but two adults? Just seems too impractical to me.

                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: David ball
                      To: hammockcamping@ <mailto:hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>
                      yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Monday, April 07, 2008 6:56 AM
                      Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Pros and Cons

                      I too am totally new to this whole thing, however; I am more excited
                      than a deer tick in a blood bank about it. I do a lot of canoe camping,
                      hosting groups for 3-10 days of 8-12 people. I am always limited by tent
                      spaces as we go down the river. I think hanging will help eliminate some
                      of that, as my space can now be used by guests.

                      As I have been investigating, the major drawback for me is my inability
                      to cuddle up with my significant other. We are going to get two hammocks
                      to hang our heads close and get a large rectangular tarp. I get my
                      quarterly bonus Friday and will be ordering a Clayton JH and a Clayton
                      Expedition with the large rectangular rain fly.

                      Canoeing, ultra light is not a concern. Even with this "heavier"
                      arrangement our combined weight is less than the Timberline we were
                      using on the ground. We are very excited about hanging and will be
                      headed to Northern Lower Michigan for a 4 day trip on Mother's Day
                      weekend. In the meantime, I wall get some practice at home. Keep the
                      feedback coming, you all and the Hammock Forum have been very helpful to
                      this newbie.

                      David

                      aqua: Cenobite

                      gingham <ginohav@yahoo. <mailto:ginohav%40yahoo.com> com> wrote:
                      Hakim's new to this group and love backpacking and stealth camping and
                      I've heard all the pros about hammock camping, but what about the cons?
                      I've read some people on other sites are worried about bears and flying
                      bugs eating you alive in a hammock. I'm thinking of purchasing a Clark
                      hammock as I don't have the time now for a DIY hammock. Every form of
                      camping has it's pro's and con's, lets hear the con's. By the way I've
                      had bears come right up to our tent look around then leave, so what's
                      the problem others have had or think they might have in a hammock?
                      Thanks

                      Working for our customers providing personal growth, team building and
                      leadership development through outdoor adventure.

                      "In the woods we return to reason and faith...there nothing will befall
                      me, no disgrace, no calamity which nature cannot repair..."

                      Ralph Waldo Emerson

                      http://www.riverjou <http://www.riverjourneys.org> rneys.org

                      David and Cara Lawson Ball
                      RiverJourneys Inc.
                      70529 Martin Road
                      Edwardsburg, MI 49112

                      574-535-3623

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      ----------------------------------------------------------

                      No virus found in this incoming message.
                      Checked by AVG.
                      Version: 7.5.519 / Virus Database: 269.22.8/1363 - Release Date:
                      4/7/2008 8:56 AM

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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                      Checked by AVG.
                      Version: 7.5.519 / Virus Database: 269.22.8/1363 - Release Date: 4/7/2008 8:56 AM


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Tom Frazier
                      Something I had considered while we waited for a hammock for my kids is setting up a ground pad and sleeping bag under and to the side of my claytor hammock
                      Message 10 of 16 , Apr 8 3:06 PM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Something I had considered while we waited for a hammock for my kids is setting up a ground pad and sleeping bag under and to the side of my claytor hammock under the speer winter tarp I've got. I could easily get myself (in a hammock) plus three or four more adults sleeping on the ground.




                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Cara Lin Bridgman
                        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Tuesday, April 08, 2008 2:51 AM
                        Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re:Pros and Cons


                        The Hennessey Hammocks come with side bungies (elastic line) that act to
                        dampen swings. They also spread out the hammock so it doesn't close up
                        around you so much. With the hammock your DH uses, it should be easy to
                        temporarily attach bungies to see if they help you (they would run from
                        widest part of hammock to the ground). If they do, then you and your
                        husband will have a great system.

                        CL

                        Mary McMonagle wrote:
                        > I'm on this list for info for DH and ds. I'm one that won't hammock. I
                        > can't stand the movement, and I don't normally get motion sick. Even
                        > sleeping under ds, who loves to sway, makes me sick listening to him
                        > swaying. I do like the protection of his tarp though.






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