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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: How can I hang my hammock indoors?

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  • Cara Lin Bridgman
    Dave & Bill, I read your emails. I understand your points about wanting to consider all the details and ramifications. I do know how important it is to
    Message 1 of 56 , Jan 25, 2008
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      Dave & Bill,

      I read your emails. I understand your points about wanting to consider
      all the details and ramifications. I do know how important it is to
      consider the risks you know about, because there are always a plethora
      of risks that you don't know about and cannot control.

      My point is that we are over-analyzing and exaggerating the risks
      involved in hammocks. This is a problem. We lose credibility if we
      choose exaggerated analogies. There's a time and a place for hyperbole,
      but we should be clear that it is hyperbole. If we spent as much time
      analyzing the risks of other activities, we wouldn't walk, ride bikes,
      go up and down steps, shower, or let our kids play on swing sets or
      climb trees. We'd definitely not ride cars, fly, or go hiking.

      This list is about hanging in hammocks, not rocket science or accident
      rates at intersections. I've appreciated some of the detailed and
      mathematical discussions of the physics involved in hanging, but I'd
      even more greatly appreciate some perspective and acceptance of the fact
      that setting up a hammock is an elementary thing that elementary school
      kids are capable of doing without getting out their programmable
      calculators or slide rules. These same kids ride bikes and climb trees.

      In most cases, the indicators of a bad hang are immediate. This is a
      good enough teacher for most people--whether or not they have any
      understanding of the physics. Hangs that fail over time go into another
      category, whether it is wear and tear on the hammock or accumulated
      stresses on the supports that eventually pull out hinges and pins and
      pull down walls and tress. The physics can be helpful for understanding
      the reasons for some of these failures and might prevent other
      failures--but there's no such thing as perfect and infallible.

      Physics are important, but the ultimate tests and the ultimate teachers
      are reality and experience.

      CL

      Dave Womble wrote:
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
      > <caralinb@...> wrote:
      >> You are still exaggerating the risks of hanging. If they were as
      >> serious as driving, we wouldn't be letting our kids play in
      > hammocks--at
      >> least, not without licenses, helmets, knee pads, and elbow pads.
      >>
      >
      > CL,
      >
      > You are missing the point I was trying to make with the comparison. I
      > am sorry that I did not make that point clear enough. Here is the
      > statement I made:
      > --------------------
      > "Bill,
      >
      > A lot of people don't understand the physics involved and aren't
      > interested in learning it. No one has guaranteed it won't work, the
      > problem is that without knowing a lot of the factors involved it is a
      > crap-shoot with some serious risks. Maybe the best answer at this
      > point is to propose a similar question that folks can better
      > understand the risks involved with so they can draw their own
      > parallels to the hammock question. How about this: "Will I be okay if
      > I drive my vehicle without stopping and going no more than 30 mph
      > through the first traffic light I come to?"
      >
      > Dave"
      > -------------------
      >
      > The parallel was intended to be about making a decision without
      > knowing enough of the particular details, not about the relative
      > seriousness of a failure between the two or even the relative
      > probability of failure between the two. Not everyone understands the
      > physics involved with hanging a hammock between two walls and
      > appreciate the technical details being discussed. But most everyone
      > understands the physics involved with driving through an intersection
      > with a traffic light and understand that some details need to be known
      > before advising someone to "just do it". The situation you encounter
      > when you want to drive through an intersection with a traffic light is
      > not always the same, just as the situation you encounter when you want
      > to attach a hammock between two walls is not always the same.
      >
      > My intention was that understanding that there are important details
      > involved in making a decision about driving through an intersection
      > with a traffic light might help everyone appreciate why so many
      > details were being discussed about hanging a hammock between two
      > walls. Apparently my intentions didn't work out.
      >
      > Dave
    • Arye P. R.
      Thanks, wish I was there - than I guess being in the Midwest (Chicago), that is why we have have both flea markets and swap meets. The famous one here is the
      Message 56 of 56 , Feb 23, 2008
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        Thanks, wish I was there - than

        I guess being in the Midwest (Chicago), that is why we have have both flea markets and swap meets. The famous one here is the Maxwell Street Market which has been around for better than 100 years.

        Arye P. Rubenstein


        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Blake Robert <xflagstaff9@...>
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2008 11:44:14 AM
        Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Superstitions hike anyone???????

        I tried living in Ft. Lauderdale-- teaching at Broward
        Community College and Florida Atlantic
        University-- --but, allergies drove me out.

        At that time the Nicaraqua Contra war ended-lots of
        supplies ended up on the market. I found a person
        selling at the Plantation Flea Market--what is called
        a swap meet out west---a pirate's wharf on the Gulf
        Coast. He charged $5/#10 can. I bought many cases. I
        wish I had bought many more.

        Starting to run low exc. on scrambled eggs---so,
        recently bought a case of freeze dried cottage cheese.
        The instructions say to mix with water at at least 72
        degrees F. That wasn't available-so, after using a
        steripen I tried mixing with Superstitions creek water
        and found the curds just floated. You can eat
        dry---sort of a sweet/sour taste. Very light for its
        volume.

        RB

        --- "Arye P. R." <aprarye@ameritech. net> wrote:

        > Can I ask where the dozens of freeze dried #10 cans
        > of food at $5 each came from
        > Arye P. Rubenstein










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