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it is good to listen to Ed

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  • billybob38801
    Ed said When first attaching the PeaPod, I like to leave some open air space between it & the hammock, then if it s going to be cold, I fill that extra space
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 16, 2008
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      Ed said "When first attaching the PeaPod, I like to leave some open
      air space between it & the hammock, then if it's going to be cold, I fill
      that extra space with down blankets, CCF pads or unused clothing like
      jackets, rain pants, sweaters, pack covers, etc-the extra warmth is
      amazing.
      Even dead leaves can be added! In fact, packing the PeaPod with dead
      leaves
      can take you well below zero F without carrying any additional weight!".

      I had been experimenting with adding pads, and may still do some more
      of that later. But I finally decided to try out Ed's suggestion from
      above. I guess it makes sense that the designer would know what works.

      So, I gave it some extra sag and, instead of wearing my 14 oz Bozeman
      Mtn works Cocoon Parka, I put it down in the pod. Just like with the
      pad, I had a little excess gap. So, I tightened it up a bit, and there
      was basically no gap as I laid in it. Then I did my usual test of
      reaching around on the outside, pushing the pod up towards my behind
      to estimate loft. To my amazement, it felt like I had a solid 4" or
      more loft under my butt and lower back! I tried it again with a
      Patagonia down vest, and it felt like I had even more loft, maybe a
      good 5" or more! Holy Cow, that is a lot of loft!!!!! And additional
      loft generated from what I would have with me anyway. So no extra
      weight. Wow!

      I have not yet had a chance to test this in really cold temps. But
      fellow hangers, don't you think this is likely to be SUPER warm, and
      even more so with the space blanket that took me to 10* the other
      night with no extra loft placed down below?

      Now I realize that IF I am needing every item of clothing I have with
      me in the wild to sleep warm on top, then this won't be much use. But
      I think that is unlikely. I have been so warm on top with a summer
      weight quilt on top inside the pod, and so far by far the greatest
      challenge has been underneath. And there is a limit anyway in how much
      you can put in the top with you, room wise. So I feel like there is
      always going to be at
      least an item or too of high loft clothing available to put down below.

      If no clothing is available, then I can go the Garlington insulator
      route. Using a trash bag with a space blanket and some trapped air in
      it, just like I used to do with my HH SuperShelter. Or if no space
      blanket, some leaves, if available, in a trash bag. Though it's
      unclear to me how well wet leaves would work. It seems like the weight
      would crush down the loft of the 900 Fp down.

      Ed's slogan "laugh at the cold" may be very apt for the PeaPod.
    • ibeboatin
      Hang from a Door hinge ?....Most doors , especially pre-hung have very short screws that only extend into door casing. Replace each short screw one at a time
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 18, 2008
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        Hang from a Door hinge ?....Most doors , especially pre-hung have very
        short screws that only extend into door casing. Replace each short
        screw one at a time with a three inch screw ( get the best from
        hardware dept). This will significantly strengthen door hinge...by
        screwing into the studding that frames the door.
      • Cara Lin Bridgman
        I m not hanging from a door hinge. I m hanging from the steel frame of one door. The other door is of the sort you re really not likely to find in the USA.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 18, 2008
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          I'm not hanging from a door hinge. I'm hanging from the steel frame of
          one door. The other door is of the sort you're really not likely to
          find in the USA. Even trailers are framed in wood, right? This door
          and the frame is plastic! The hinge is cheap aluminum. Think of the
          cheapest door, frame, and hinge and make it cheaper. Both frames are
          set into rebar-reinforced concrete. There are not that many residential
          buildings like this in the USA, but they're all over the place here in
          Taiwan.

          The reason it works is because the real pull is on a wooden pole. Well,
          sometimes I'm surprised this works. It was a late-night jury rig for
          short term use that's now run into almost 2 months. Guess I'll have to
          figure out how to take pictures and post them.

          CL

          ibeboatin wrote:
          > Hang from a Door hinge ?....Most doors , especially pre-hung have very
          > short screws that only extend into door casing. Replace each short
          > screw one at a time with a three inch screw ( get the best from
          > hardware dept). This will significantly strengthen door hinge...by
          > screwing into the studding that frames the door.
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