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tips for use of CCF pads with PeaPods( or UQs)?

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  • billybob38801
    Hey, guys. I was playing around with my PeaPod and some pads the other day. It seems likely that max warmth would be achieved simply adding the pad, in an SPE
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 13, 2008
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      Hey, guys. I was playing around with my PeaPod and some pads the other
      day. It seems likely that max warmth would be achieved simply adding
      the pad, in an SPE or otherwise, inside the hammock, with the Pod
      adjusted the same as without a pad. I tried this and I can attest that
      you quickly have some serious warmth going on from below! But of
      course, then you have to hassle with a pad in the hammock.

      OTOH, the pad placed down between the pod and the hammock is easily
      managed and adjusted from within the hammock. Big plus! BUT, I notice
      that if I just add it to the Pod as already optimally adjusted, it
      sags down a few inches below my back. I suppose that is because the
      weight of the Ridgerest pad is compressing the down, which was almost
      lofting to/ touching my back, with very little air gap, before I added
      my pad.

      So then, I can readjust the pod for more tension, and that will pull
      the pad up against my back. But I can only suspect that will compress
      the down even more, maybe leaving me with only the insulation of the
      pad and maybe 1/4" loft! I am already playing with a simple alteration
      idea, where I add a cord with loop on one side of the pad, and a piece
      of shock cord on the other, and once in connect them and then pull the
      pad snug up against my back. All while leaving the Pod adjusted as
      though there is no pad in use.

      But first I thought I would solicit tips/ideas over here re: using
      pads between a PeaPod and the hammock.
      Thanks in advance for any ideas
      Bill
    • tim garner
      i think you re right about the weight of the ccf (little as it may be) working against the full loft of the down pea pod. i think the added cords you mentioned
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 13, 2008
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        i think you're right about the weight of the ccf (little as it may be) working against the full loft of the down pea pod.
        i think the added cords you mentioned should work well.

        i've thought of something similar.
        this would not only allow you to use the ccf as an independently supported insulation source under your hammock, but it could also be helpful in using the ccf for other things as well...
        like a large wind screen to help the smaller wind screen on your stove.
        i have done that using my ccf & hiking poles to create a wind break for the stove & it works great!

        billybob38801 <billybob38801@...> wrote:
        Hey, guys. I was playing around with my PeaPod and some pads the other
        day. It seems likely that max warmth would be achieved simply adding
        the pad, in an SPE or otherwise, inside the hammock, with the Pod
        adjusted the same as without a pad. I tried this and I can attest that
        you quickly have some serious warmth going on from below! But of
        course, then you have to hassle with a pad in the hammock.

        OTOH, the pad placed down between the pod and the hammock is easily
        managed and adjusted from within the hammock. Big plus! BUT, I notice
        that if I just add it to the Pod as already optimally adjusted, it
        sags down a few inches below my back. I suppose that is because the
        weight of the Ridgerest pad is compressing the down, which was almost
        lofting to/ touching my back, with very little air gap, before I added
        my pad.

        So then, I can readjust the pod for more tension, and that will pull
        the pad up against my back. But I can only suspect that will compress
        the down even more, maybe leaving me with only the insulation of the
        pad and maybe 1/4" loft! I am already playing with a simple alteration
        idea, where I add a cord with loop on one side of the pad, and a piece
        of shock cord on the other, and once in connect them and then pull the
        pad snug up against my back. All while leaving the Pod adjusted as
        though there is no pad in use.

        But first I thought I would solicit tips/ideas over here re: using
        pads between a PeaPod and the hammock.
        Thanks in advance for any ideas
        Bill




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      • Johan van Dijk
        Bill and of course everybody else, I ve tried something similar with my No Sniveler Underquilt and my HH last week of december. Works okay but I too had the
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 14, 2008
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          Bill and of course everybody else,

          I've tried something similar with my No Sniveler Underquilt and my HH last
          week of december. Works okay but I too had the idea of adjusting the pad
          more towards the body of the hammock to let the lofty down of the underquilt
          do it's work....

          Grtz Johan

          On Jan 13, 2008 10:29 PM, billybob38801 <billybob38801@...> wrote:

          > Hey, guys. I was playing around with my PeaPod and some pads the other
          > day. It seems likely that max warmth would be achieved simply adding
          > the pad, in an SPE or otherwise, inside the hammock, with the Pod
          > adjusted the same as without a pad. I tried this and I can attest that
          > you quickly have some serious warmth going on from below! But of
          > course, then you have to hassle with a pad in the hammock.
          >
          > OTOH, the pad placed down between the pod and the hammock is easily
          > managed and adjusted from within the hammock. Big plus! BUT, I notice
          > that if I just add it to the Pod as already optimally adjusted, it
          > sags down a few inches below my back. I suppose that is because the
          > weight of the Ridgerest pad is compressing the down, which was almost
          > lofting to/ touching my back, with very little air gap, before I added
          > my pad.
          >
          > So then, I can readjust the pod for more tension, and that will pull
          > the pad up against my back. But I can only suspect that will compress
          > the down even more, maybe leaving me with only the insulation of the
          > pad and maybe 1/4" loft! I am already playing with a simple alteration
          > idea, where I add a cord with loop on one side of the pad, and a piece
          > of shock cord on the other, and once in connect them and then pull the
          > pad snug up against my back. All while leaving the Pod adjusted as
          > though there is no pad in use.
          >
          > But first I thought I would solicit tips/ideas over here re: using
          > pads between a PeaPod and the hammock.
          > Thanks in advance for any ideas
          > Bill
          >
          >
          >



          --
          It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most
          intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

          --
          mob: +31 6 44 80 82 63
          email: gonewalkabout2003@...

          http://www.geocities.com/johanvandijk
          http://calendar.yahoo.com/johanvandijk
          --


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • billybob38801
          Johan, You have, or are about to have, a PeaPod and Speer hammock, correct? Did you get these with plans of replacing your No Sniveler and HH? Or, are you more
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 14, 2008
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            Johan,
            You have, or are about to have, a PeaPod and Speer hammock, correct?
            Did you get these with plans of replacing your No Sniveler and HH? Or,
            are you more planning on somehow using the No Sniveler in combination
            with the PeaPod? If so, I guess that wouldn't be unexpected as I
            imagine it gets pretty cold in your neck of the woods!

            I had an interesting experience this AM. I wimped out and did not
            sleep out last night, but left my PeaPod hanging outside under my HH
            Sil nylon hex tarp. But when I got up a little before 0700, I noticed
            it was 25*. So I threw on some mid weight fleece pants/jacket/hat,
            grabbed my summer weight quallofil bag and went out- before coffee or
            anything- and hopped in. The outside of the PeaPod and underside of
            the tarp were both COVERED in a thick layer of frost. I settled in
            with about a 4" diameter breathing hole above my face. Of course, the
            pod was very much ice cold to start. In the small amount of time it
            took me to get in and get the quilt up and close the Velcro on the
            pod, my hands( no gloves) were REALLY cold.

            After 10 minutes or so, I was VERY warm on top. Almost too warm, but I
            enjoyed it while my hands got back to normal. But, I noticed my
            back/behind was not nearly as arm, and on the verge of feeling cool.
            After about 30 minutes, still almost too warm on top but a little cool
            on the bottom, I felt around underneath. There seemed to be very
            little to no air gap, but the loft seemed OK but certainly not max. I
            was surprised at not being plenty warm on bottom at 25*, considering
            my previous experience OK at 10*F, though I did have a space blanket
            that time. Still, this am is 15* warmer! Just goes to show how many
            variables are involved in keeping warm!

            So I hopped out, adjusted for just a bit more sag, went in and got the
            space blanket plus a pillow and something to go under my knees, and
            settled in again, with the SB between me and the pod. But when I got
            out a few minutes earlier, I noticed that I was rubbing against the
            tarp and getting a good bit of frost all over my jacket and hat, some
            of which I no doubt had taken into the hammock with me the first time.
            This time I was more careful to avoid this, which was tricky. Once
            again, quickly super warm on top. It was better on the bottom, but
            still a bit cooler, not really warm. I nodded of for a few minutes,
            and got up after about 30 minutes, by which time I now noticed I was
            plenty warm on the bottom also. I also noticed that just me being in
            the hammock had caused most of the frost/moisture on the outside of
            the pod to go away.

            So, the space blanket seems to really help for very little weight( 2
            ozs ) or bulk or cost. Just like it always did in my HH Super Shelter.
            A lot of folks don't fel the SBs are worth their weight, but they
            always seem to help for me. Probably the vapor barrier effect as much
            as anything. Although, the slight sag adjustment might have made some
            dif. I suspect other factors were the layer of frost that already
            surrounded the pod before I got in, moisture I inadvertently took into
            the pod with me, and the fact that the pod was ice cold from hanging
            below freezing all night. Probably some moisture affecting the down,
            plus a lot of time required for my body heat to warm up the pod on
            bottom.

            I look forward to reports on you PeaPod.
            Bill


            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Johan van Dijk"
            <gonewalkabout2003@...> wrote:
            >
            > Bill and of course everybody else,
            >
            > I've tried something similar with my No Sniveler Underquilt and my
            HH last
            > week of december. Works okay but I too had the idea of adjusting the pad
            > more towards the body of the hammock to let the lofty down of the
            underquilt
            > do it's work....
            >
            > Grtz Johan
            >
            > On Jan 13, 2008 10:29 PM, billybob38801 <billybob38801@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Hey, guys. I was playing around with my PeaPod and some pads the
            other
            > > day. It seems likely that max warmth would be achieved simply adding
            > > the pad, in an SPE or otherwise, inside the hammock, with the Pod
            > > adjusted the same as without a pad. I tried this and I can attest that
            > > you quickly have some serious warmth going on from below! But of
            > > course, then you have to hassle with a pad in the hammock.
            > >
            > > OTOH, the pad placed down between the pod and the hammock is easily
            > > managed and adjusted from within the hammock. Big plus! BUT, I notice
            > > that if I just add it to the Pod as already optimally adjusted, it
            > > sags down a few inches below my back. I suppose that is because the
            > > weight of the Ridgerest pad is compressing the down, which was almost
            > > lofting to/ touching my back, with very little air gap, before I added
            > > my pad.
            > >
            > > So then, I can readjust the pod for more tension, and that will pull
            > > the pad up against my back. But I can only suspect that will compress
            > > the down even more, maybe leaving me with only the insulation of the
            > > pad and maybe 1/4" loft! I am already playing with a simple alteration
            > > idea, where I add a cord with loop on one side of the pad, and a piece
            > > of shock cord on the other, and once in connect them and then pull the
            > > pad snug up against my back. All while leaving the Pod adjusted as
            > > though there is no pad in use.
            > >
            > > But first I thought I would solicit tips/ideas over here re: using
            > > pads between a PeaPod and the hammock.
            > > Thanks in advance for any ideas
            > > Bill
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most
            > intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.
            >
            > --
            > mob: +31 6 44 80 82 63
            > email: gonewalkabout2003@...
            >
            > http://www.geocities.com/johanvandijk
            > http://calendar.yahoo.com/johanvandijk
            > --
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Cara Lin Bridgman
            Bill, Where are you? Is it generally humid or generally dry in your back yard? From all I ve heard and read, vapor barriers really only work where it s dry.
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 14, 2008
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              Bill,

              Where are you? Is it generally humid or generally dry in your back
              yard? From all I've heard and read, vapor barriers really only work
              where it's dry.

              I live where it's soggy and we can get rolling and freezing fogs.
              Because of the humidity, we routinely carry sleeping bags rated for
              temperatures much lower than we'll actually experience (seldom below
              -10*C). I've not yet hammocked in these near-freezing conditions, but
              have already experienced a rolling (but not freezing) fog.

              I did try once to hang a large 'truck sun-shade' sort of ccf pad under
              my hammock Garlington-taco-style. I was camped in a picnic shelter, but
              the ccf pad collected water. I've not yet had any moisture collect in
              the Tyvek cover (very much like the JRB weather-shield, I suspect) I
              made to go outside the JRB nest to keep off punctures, splash-back, and
              dog noses.

              CL

              billybob38801 wrote:
              > So, the space blanket seems to really help for very little weight( 2
              > ozs ) or bulk or cost. Just like it always did in my HH Super Shelter.
              > A lot of folks don't fel the SBs are worth their weight, but they
              > always seem to help for me. Probably the vapor barrier effect as much
              > as anything.
            • billybob38801
              Hi Cara Lin, I am in north MS near the TN line.( where are you?) And high humidity is the norm. But in my experience, regardless of humidity, a VB will, if
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 14, 2008
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                Hi Cara Lin,
                I am in north MS near the TN line.( where are you?) And high humidity
                is the norm. But
                in my experience, regardless of humidity, a VB will, if nothing else,
                stop any moisture from your body from getting into your insulation and
                decreasing it's insulating value. And maybe even freezing in the outer
                layers of the insulation. Though it is important, NO DOUBT, to not
                have any insulation between you and the VB that you are not willing to
                get wet. It will also, regardless of the humidity
                level outside, stop any evaporative cooling that your body might
                otherwise make happen.

                Though I'm pretty sure that if the humidity is low, you would tend to
                get more evaporative cooling than if the humidity was near 100%. For
                the same reasons that you FEEL hotter at 90* in MS than you do at 100*
                in Arizona. Much more efficient evaporative cooling in AZ due to the
                super low humidity. In fact,in AZ, evaporative coolers ( simply a fan
                drawing air through a filter soaked with water) can keep your house
                cool ( though humid ) at well over 100*, no air conditioner needed.

                So I think you are right that you would see a bigger benefit from a VB
                in say, AZ than MS. But I think you still see a significant effect
                regardless of humidity. Unless the temperature level was high enough,
                along with high humidity, that there was no worry about any
                condensation of of body vapor in the outer layers of the bag.

                And I don't really know whether the benefit I have seen from the space
                blanket (on a recent 10*F night and at this mornings 25*s and on other
                nights with my HH Super Shelter)was due to vapor barrier, radiant heat
                loss block, or both.

                But your idea of a cover is something I have been thinking of for the
                PeaPod, to keep moisture off. I know Ed does not recommend any thing
                but very breathable shells ( DWR only ) for the PeaPod, but I wonder
                how a separate shell ( cover, sock ) would work in the battle against
                moisture?

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
                <caralinb@...> wrote:
                >
                > Bill,
                >
                > Where are you? Is it generally humid or generally dry in your back
                > yard? From all I've heard and read, vapor barriers really only work
                > where it's dry.
                >
                > I live where it's soggy and we can get rolling and freezing fogs.
                > Because of the humidity, we routinely carry sleeping bags rated for
                > temperatures much lower than we'll actually experience (seldom below
                > -10*C). I've not yet hammocked in these near-freezing conditions, but
                > have already experienced a rolling (but not freezing) fog.
                >
                > I did try once to hang a large 'truck sun-shade' sort of ccf pad under
                > my hammock Garlington-taco-style. I was camped in a picnic shelter,
                but
                > the ccf pad collected water. I've not yet had any moisture collect in
                > the Tyvek cover (very much like the JRB weather-shield, I suspect) I
                > made to go outside the JRB nest to keep off punctures, splash-back, and
                > dog noses.
                >
                > CL
                >
                > billybob38801 wrote:
                > > So, the space blanket seems to really help for very little weight( 2
                > > ozs ) or bulk or cost. Just like it always did in my HH Super Shelter.
                > > A lot of folks don't fel the SBs are worth their weight, but they
                > > always seem to help for me. Probably the vapor barrier effect as much
                > > as anything.
                >
              • Cara Lin Bridgman
                Hi Bill, I live in the humid sub-tropics of Taiwan, but usually hike in Taiwan s montane and sub-alpine zone (elevations: 2000-3952 m). Taiwan at 2000 m is
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 14, 2008
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                  Hi Bill,

                  I live in the humid sub-tropics of Taiwan, but usually hike in Taiwan's
                  montane and sub-alpine zone (elevations: 2000-3952 m). Taiwan at 2000 m
                  is not that different from Tennessee (where I went to school) or
                  Kentucky (where my parents live now). Western TN, near Memphis, is
                  definitely humid. I've not yet hammocked in freezing or near-freezing
                  temperatures, though.

                  In December, I was hammocking in the almost-tropics of southern Taiwan.
                  I was hammocking because the university guest house was booked solid,
                  but my hammock is much more comfortable than any bed in a guest house.
                  Anyway, it was warm enough that I didn't even need the quilt until the
                  clouds got replaced by clear sky. I did the hammock-nest-tyvek and
                  didn't notice any condensation.

                  I had a bad night only because of an idiot dog. The hammock doesn't
                  seem to affect birds, but dogs sure tend to bark at it--must be too
                  weird for them.

                  Last spring, I fooled around with a mylar space blanket one night at
                  about 2000 m (more Garlington-taco), but it sure made a heap of noise.
                  Tyvek, after being run through the washing machine (cold water, no
                  soap), makes hardly any noise at all. Apparently Tyvek breaths, if you
                  keep the logo side out.

                  CL

                  billybob38801 wrote:
                  > Hi Cara Lin,
                  > I am in north MS near the TN line.( where are you?) And high humidity
                  > is the norm. But
                  > in my experience, regardless of humidity, a VB will, if nothing else,
                  > stop any moisture from your body from getting into your insulation and
                  > decreasing it's insulating value. And maybe even freezing in the outer
                  > layers of the insulation. Though it is important, NO DOUBT, to not
                  > have any insulation between you and the VB that you are not willing to
                  > get wet. It will also, regardless of the humidity
                  > level outside, stop any evaporative cooling that your body might
                  > otherwise make happen.
                • billybob38801
                  Hi Cara Lin, Wow! Taiwan! The internet world is amazing. And being totally ignorant of the area, I never even thought of Taiwan as having montane and
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 15, 2008
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                    Hi Cara Lin,
                    Wow! Taiwan! The internet world is amazing. And being totally ignorant
                    of the area, I never even thought of Taiwan as having montane and
                    sub-alpine ( also alpine? )zones. Re: space blanket noise- the $2, 2
                    oz ones I get from Wal-mart are no doubt noisy devils. Irritatingly
                    noise when I set them up or pack them up. But amazingly, once I get
                    them in either my HH Supershelter or my Speer PeaPod, I never even
                    come close to hearing them. Otherwise, I probably wouldn't be able to
                    tolerate them. Of course, they don't appear to be breathable at all.
                    So you must keep the SP between the hammock and any insulation, or the
                    insulation will get wet. Though actually, I don't usually see a whole
                    lot of condensation on the SB. I suppose because it is not wrapped
                    around be and is still open to air to the side, and it's not tight
                    against me. But you say Tyvek is breathable? I didn't know that.
                    Bill

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
                    <caralinb@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Bill,
                    >
                    > I live in the humid sub-tropics of Taiwan, but usually hike in Taiwan's
                    > montane and sub-alpine zone (elevations: 2000-3952 m). Taiwan at
                    2000 m
                    > is not that different from Tennessee (where I went to school) or
                    > Kentucky (where my parents live now). Western TN, near Memphis, is
                    > definitely humid. I've not yet hammocked in freezing or near-freezing
                    > temperatures, though.
                    >
                    > In December, I was hammocking in the almost-tropics of southern Taiwan.
                    > I was hammocking because the university guest house was booked solid,
                    > but my hammock is much more comfortable than any bed in a guest house.
                    > Anyway, it was warm enough that I didn't even need the quilt until the
                    > clouds got replaced by clear sky. I did the hammock-nest-tyvek and
                    > didn't notice any condensation.
                    >
                    > I had a bad night only because of an idiot dog. The hammock doesn't
                    > seem to affect birds, but dogs sure tend to bark at it--must be too
                    > weird for them.
                    >
                    > Last spring, I fooled around with a mylar space blanket one night at
                    > about 2000 m (more Garlington-taco), but it sure made a heap of noise.
                    > Tyvek, after being run through the washing machine (cold water, no
                    > soap), makes hardly any noise at all. Apparently Tyvek breaths, if you
                    > keep the logo side out.
                    >
                    > CL
                  • Cara Lin Bridgman
                    Hi Bill, No one thinks of Taiwan as having a montane or sub-alpine zone. It s all supposed to be factories producing cheap electronics and bicycle parts...
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 15, 2008
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                      Hi Bill,

                      No one thinks of Taiwan as having a montane or sub-alpine zone. It's
                      all supposed to be factories producing cheap electronics and bicycle
                      parts... There may be 23 million people on the island, but they and the
                      factories all bunched up on the flat land around the edge, especially
                      the western edge. Over 50% of the island is still forested, mainly
                      because the loggers can't get to the trees, the mountains are so rugged
                      and steep. They're still growing and aspire to exceed Himalayan heights.

                      Taiwan's alpine zone is hotly debated. A whole bunch of folks, myself
                      included, think Taiwan does not have an alpine zone. A bunch of others
                      do. One definition of an alpine zone is that it is too cold for trees
                      to grow. I think Taiwan doesn't have trees on the top of it's tallest
                      mountain (3953 m in elevation) because there's no space for them. The
                      juniper trees on top of Taiwan's second and third tallest mountains (I
                      forget how much over 3800 m in elevation) show strong Krumholtz
                      effects--i.e. they're growing horizontally away from prevailing winds,
                      not vertically like normal trees.

                      I'll have to rethink space blankets. I've still got the one I tried
                      out. I'm just not sure I want to risk getting my clothes and the
                      hammock damp from my sweat. For me, nighttime is the main chance to dry
                      out. That's one of the other problems of Taiwan's montane and
                      sub-alpine zone, it gets 7-8 meters (yes, that's the correct amount) of
                      rain a year. So, it really is soggy up there. Where we live on the
                      west coast of the island, we only get about 2 meters of rain a year, and
                      half that can show up in one typhoon.

                      As for Tyvek, all I've read about it in hiking webpages say it's
                      breathable. That's probably what makes it suitable for use as home
                      siding. I think that also explains some of the problems some people had
                      using Tyvek as a ground cloth. If you're kneeling on it in a puddle, it
                      probably will leak. The leak complaints, though, haven't mentioned
                      whether they had the label side down or whether they had washed it to
                      remove the stiffness. I suspect washing and folding would reduce a
                      little of its water resistance. As a 'weather-shield' on the outside of
                      my hammock, though, it is doing fine.

                      CL

                      billybob38801 wrote:
                      > Hi Cara Lin,
                      > Wow! Taiwan! The internet world is amazing. And being totally ignorant
                      > of the area, I never even thought of Taiwan as having montane and
                      > sub-alpine ( also alpine? )zones. Re: space blanket noise- the $2, 2
                      > oz ones I get from Wal-mart are no doubt noisy devils. Irritatingly
                      > noise when I set them up or pack them up. But amazingly, once I get
                      > them in either my HH Supershelter or my Speer PeaPod, I never even
                      > come close to hearing them. Otherwise, I probably wouldn't be able to
                      > tolerate them. Of course, they don't appear to be breathable at all.
                      > So you must keep the SP between the hammock and any insulation, or the
                      > insulation will get wet. Though actually, I don't usually see a whole
                      > lot of condensation on the SB. I suppose because it is not wrapped
                      > around be and is still open to air to the side, and it's not tight
                      > against me. But you say Tyvek is breathable? I didn't know that.
                      > Bill
                      >
                      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman
                      > <caralinb@...> wrote:
                      >> Hi Bill,
                      >>
                      >> I live in the humid sub-tropics of Taiwan, but usually hike in Taiwan's
                      >> montane and sub-alpine zone (elevations: 2000-3952 m). Taiwan at
                      > 2000 m
                      >> is not that different from Tennessee (where I went to school) or
                      >> Kentucky (where my parents live now). Western TN, near Memphis, is
                      >> definitely humid. I've not yet hammocked in freezing or near-freezing
                      >> temperatures, though.
                      >>
                      >> In December, I was hammocking in the almost-tropics of southern Taiwan.
                      >> I was hammocking because the university guest house was booked solid,
                      >> but my hammock is much more comfortable than any bed in a guest house.
                      >> Anyway, it was warm enough that I didn't even need the quilt until the
                      >> clouds got replaced by clear sky. I did the hammock-nest-tyvek and
                      >> didn't notice any condensation.
                      >>
                      >> I had a bad night only because of an idiot dog. The hammock doesn't
                      >> seem to affect birds, but dogs sure tend to bark at it--must be too
                      >> weird for them.
                      >>
                      >> Last spring, I fooled around with a mylar space blanket one night at
                      >> about 2000 m (more Garlington-taco), but it sure made a heap of noise.
                      >> Tyvek, after being run through the washing machine (cold water, no
                      >> soap), makes hardly any noise at all. Apparently Tyvek breaths, if you
                      >> keep the logo side out.
                      >>
                      >> CL
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      --

                      Please note my new email address: caralinb@...
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      Cara Lin Bridgman

                      P.O. Box 013 Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
                      Longjing Sinjhuang
                      Taichung County 434
                      Taiwan http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin/
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                    • Johan van Dijk
                      Sorry for the late reply. Been awfully busy with work and my scuba diving hobby. My Speer setup will probably replace my HH. Not sure about the No Sniveler
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 21, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Sorry for the late reply. Been awfully busy with work and my scuba diving
                        hobby.

                        My Speer setup will probably replace my HH. Not sure about the No Sniveler
                        though. I might use that as a topquilt/down poncho when low temps make that
                        necessary.

                        We haven't had any real cold weather... but me being used to tropics
                        anything around 30 F (0 C) is cold enough ;-)

                        One trick I learned concerning "cold weather camping" was to unpack your
                        sleeping bag just shortly before going to bed... give it enough time to
                        loft, but not enough to collect the cold/damp...

                        >
                        > So I will keep you all posted about my experiences with the peapod and
                        the hammock/mozzienet/tarp when I can make some time.

                        Right now we have a bit of an autumn like storm blowing with a warm day temp
                        of around 8 C (who is talking about winter here <eg>).

                        Grtz Johan

                        --
                        It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most
                        intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

                        --
                        mob: +31 6 44 80 82 63
                        email: gonewalkabout2003@...

                        http://www.geocities.com/johanvandijk
                        http://calendar.yahoo.com/johanvandijk
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