Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[Hammock Camping] Re: Speer ridge line

Expand Messages
  • Dave Womble
    ... Ralph, A structural ridgeline allows the hammock suspension line attached at the tree to be at an angle less than the hammock sag angle... that is how it
    Message 1 of 37 , Jan 9, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn" <Ralph.oborn@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Dave wrote:
      > A structural ridgeline alters the forces or loads or tension on the
      > hammock suspension lines and the trees they attach to. In doing this
      > it does produce a consistent sag angle for a hammock as long as the
      > hammock suspension lines are at a smaller sag angle than what the
      > structural ridgeline limits the sag angle to.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Dave, I'm trying to understand the forces and why a structural ridgeline
      > will increase the tension on the tree (with associated bark damage).
      >
      > Is it because us guys with structural lines tend to hang lower aand
      > therefore tighter?
      >
      > Ralph
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >

      Ralph,

      A structural ridgeline allows the hammock suspension line attached at
      the tree to be at an angle less than the hammock sag angle... that is
      how it works for the ridgeline to be taut and set the sag angle. If
      the hammock sag angle is set to 30 degrees by a structural ridgeline,
      the hammock suspension lines can be at 30, 20, 15 or even less if
      someone really tightens it up. Of course the smaller that angle, the
      more force on the suspension line and less it drops below where it is
      tied on the trees. The forces on the tree with the suspension lines
      at 15 degrees are about 2x what the forces are with the suspension
      lines at 30 degrees and the hammock drops less when the suspension
      lines are at 15 degrees than it does when the suspension lines are at
      30 degrees-- but that difference in height is also a function of the
      separation between the trees as well as the length of the hammock.

      The point I'm trying to make is that you don't get something for
      nothing with a structural ridgeline and you need to be aware of how
      that plays out. If you're not, you are tempted to just keep
      tightening the suspension lines when the hammock ends up too low and
      that can generate some pretty high forces.

      As was pointed out, I have posted a few things about this in the files
      section over the years.
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping/files/Youngblood%27s/

      Dave
    • Dave Womble
      I updated the file I previously posted by including some sketches to help explain what I said. It messes up the previous link but it is the same name under
      Message 37 of 37 , Jan 16, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        I updated the file I previously posted by including some sketches to
        help explain what I said. It messes up the previous link but it is
        the same name under Youngblood's folder and this should be the link

        http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v1/8BuOR_aqY-p99MHhoq9u40Wsacy4XOTpIn-o2G5KOtGM3Qmc5TVomj0dsM1O-YgxdlduT1FrTAl5pfYja8Sy1M4AvkWhng/Youngblood%27s/Structural%20Ridgelines-%2001162008.doc

        Dave
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.