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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Survival/emergency topics, was Solar Stills

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  • Johan van Dijk
    ... in our hammocks? Reminds me of an old story of a guy who used a hammock in Africa. During the night a herd of Cape Buffalo walked along his camp (somewhere
    Message 1 of 68 , Dec 3, 2007
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      >So, my question still stands - what if an animal happened upon us hung up
      in our hammocks?

      Reminds me of an old story of a guy who used a hammock in Africa. During the
      night a herd of Cape Buffalo walked along his camp (somewhere during the
      70's).
      Cape Buffalo being one of the deadliest animals in Africa (with hippo's) he
      managed to stay cool and started singing and talking to them. They amazingly
      left him alone (or so the stories goes....). Flight reactions from one
      animal provoke another animals actions....

      I personally hammocked in areas where there are/were/could be tigers,
      leopards, (malay sun) bears, jaguars, dingos, and never bothered too much
      with all the "what if, then else, or maybe" situations.... given you take
      normal precautions....but to answer (a bit of) your question: IF you are in
      your hammock, and IF you are enclosed (taco wrap style in your HH or Speer
      Peapod), and IF the animal was out there after you (which I don't believe
      that much), you are probably done for, unless you outrun your camping buddy
      ;-)

      I did stumble on some other potentially dangerous animals by accident
      (completely OT). Like Tod said (iirc), just watch out when climbing out of
      your hammock, then you might step on porcupines, hedgehocks, snakes, ants (a
      lot of them can give you a nasty bite (bare footed dumb mistake I know....)

      Hope this helps...

      Grtz Johan
      --
      It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most
      intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

      --
      mob: +31 6 44 80 82 63
      email: gonewalkabout2003@...

      http://www.geocities.com/johanvandijk
      http://calendar.yahoo.com/johanvandijk
      --


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jamie D.
      Yep, a copious amount of clean water used to flush a wound (at pressure if possible) is really all you need. some studies suggest it s even potentially more
      Message 68 of 68 , Dec 18, 2007
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        Yep, a copious amount of clean water used to flush a wound (at
        pressure if possible) is really all you need. some studies suggest
        it's even potentially more destructive to the injured tissue to use
        peroxide or other anit-bacterial cleaning agents.

        Huh, good old mother nature provided H2O, how about that.

        Another thing I find really interesting is that according to the
        rescue peeps I've talked to most rescues occur within a 72 hour
        period. That has changed the way I look at my "survival" kit.

        Jamie in AZ

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, pure mahem <pure_mahem@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Thanks for the info I will definately add the women's sanitary pad
        and remove the towlettes now that I know this. The reason I went with
        clorox as a water treatment is that I remember reading in one of the
        outdoor magazines or survival shows that overdosing iodine can be
        potentially deadly where as the clorox has a bit more of a higher
        fudge factor. another thing I thought of is that since I carry the
        alcohol couldn't I dilute a bit of the gel in a bit of water and come
        up with an applicalble antiseptic if needed? For the most part I guess
        I always figured that I would just use my treated water as a flush if
        I needed one.
        >
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