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Tarp shelters and related questions...

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  • Linda Ellis
    ... Thanks for the link, Greg! Now, I want to know where that orange tarp came from! I d also like a box or two of those bright orange, heavy-duty garbage
    Message 1 of 37 , Dec 3, 2007
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      --- Greg Dunlap <blackey@...> wrote:
      > Here is one of the best "guides" on using a tarp for a shelter that I have
      > ever seen. http://www.equipped.org/tarp-shelters.htm
      >
      Thanks for the link, Greg! Now, I want to know where that orange tarp came from! I'd also like a
      box or two of those bright orange, heavy-duty garbage bags that highway departments use, but can't
      find any locally. On-line, I can only find places where I can buy 100 - don't need that many.

      This, of course, brings up my next question. Our general plan has been to accumulate a lot of
      blaze orange and other bright colors of gear for our woodland adventures. Our reasoning is, we
      are not interested in hiding. The point at which we'd be pulling out a lot of this gear, we'd
      probably be in a situation where we really want to be found. Maybe there's been an injury, or
      maybe we have strayed off the main trail (see my previous post about survival/emergencies). In
      any event, we want to be visible. Also, we were hiking during hunting season. We weren't in the
      hunting area, but ya never know! Finally, bright colors for equipment make it less likely that
      something accidentally gets left at a campsite, or falls off unnoticed on the trail.

      So, we have yellow ponchos, orange and silver emergency blankets, orange gloves and hats, and so
      on. Our dry-sacks are orange. Our waterproof boxes are yellow.

      Now, though, I'm reading that camouflage and earth-tones may have safety benefits, in addition to
      being less offensive to others in the woods.

      Does anybody have opinions on the SAFETY aspects of camo/earth vs. bright colors?



      Linda
      The Truly Educated Never Graduate
    • Tod Massa
      Rosaleen, will do. This is a scout trip and we are not sure if we will get on the AT itself or not, and will be on the east side of the mountain. Since we are
      Message 37 of 37 , Jan 6, 2008
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        Rosaleen, will do.
        This is a scout trip and we are not sure if we will get on the AT itself or not, and will be on the east side of the mountain. Since we are base camping, we will carry our own water since previous experiences dictates that is the best strategy.

        I hiked from Rockfish Gap to the Tye River in mid-October...water sources, using the term loosely, were generally 8-10 miles apart. A few weeks ago the troop did 10 miles on the AT from just before the Devils' Marbleyard to the James River despite the recent rains, there was no water until Matt's Creek, so at least and eight mile span there.

        Tod


        ______________________________________________________________________________

        Ain't got no mo' mojo, but I got plenty o' banjo.



        ----- Original Message ----

        From: Rosaleen Sullivan <rosaleen43@...>

        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

        Sent: Sunday, January 6, 2008 9:10:11 AM

        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: I wanted to know



        Tod-



        Please post after your Mt. Rogers trip and let us know what you find out

        about the water situation and the animals living in the area.



        I had the pleasure of hiking there last summer as part of an AT section

        hike. Much of the southern AT was experiencing a severe drought. My

        partner and I changed our plan to hike the area south of Damascus because of

        the drought (as much as 18 miles between reliable water sources, stories of

        animals going after hikers' food more aggressively than normal, and juvenile

        bears reportedly "guarding" watering holes). Prudence dictated that with

        the time, gear ready, and plenty of food, we just buy another map and

        relocate our intended section.



        After early summer, I have heard the the drought worsened. In July, locals

        had stories of the gov't taking over posession of some horses because owners

        couldn't provided food and water (animal cruelty intervention) , and farmers

        were losing huge amounts of money selling undermatured cattle early because

        of using up the feed planned for the next winter. Finally, the Mt. Rogers

        area itself was running dry. You may want to check on the streams for

        yourself before your trip, in case there has not been much precipitation

        this fall.



        While I can't atually DO anything, I would like to know how things are going

        for the local farmers and the creatures that live in the area.



        Thanks, in advance, for whatever you can tell us.



        Rosaleen



        Re: I wanted to know



        Tod Massa <todmassa@yahoo. com> wrote:



        (SNIP)



        I may try testing this set up myself on Mt Rogers in a couple of

        weeks....i'm

        going to hammock anyway, and i can set up my summer hammock separately with

        a

        similar blanket.



        tod
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