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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Survival/emergency topics, was Solar Stills

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  • Linda Ellis
    ... Another good thing! ... This goes against all the advice I ve been reading or watching in DVDs about surviving an emergency. The common counsel is first,
    Message 1 of 68 , Dec 3, 2007
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      Cara Lin Bridgman <caralinb@...> wrote:
      > Somebody on this list or in one of the hammock forums describes having a
      > pack of wolves run under her hammock. I've noticed that birds do not
      > seem to recognize my Hennessey hammock as something to do with humans.

      Another good thing!
      >
      > Fire? I always think of Jack London's To Build a Fire. Really, if you're cold, keep walking
      > or get into your sleeping bag and crack open that bar of emergency chocolate. I don't think
      > I'd want a fire too close to my hammock.
      >
      > Frankly, in your waterfall scenario, depending a whole lot on the trail conditions, I think the
      > best thing would be to keep moving slowly until you get back to the trail head.

      This goes against all the advice I've been reading or watching in DVDs about surviving an
      emergency. The common counsel is first, build a shelter of some sort, and then build a fire.
      They advise building a fire a few feet in front of your lean-to, so the heat will be reflected
      back into the shelter by the tarp. If there's time, they also advise building a backstop for the
      fire opposite your lean-to, to push more heat your direction.

      Your suggestion may work if it's just a sprained ankle, and limping might mean the return trip is
      three hours instead of four. But what if it's a broken leg or something more serious, where
      moving is far more difficult or impossible? In such cases, I would prefer to take time to rest
      and think. Of course, each situation is different, but I'm thinking that setting up a lean-to and
      hammock just off-trail, with a fire a few feet into the trail, would be workable.

      I would also be uncomfortable trying to navigate an unfamiliar trail at night. A few weeks ago,
      we took a three-mile hike on a trail that was shaped like a big Q. Walk in on the tail of the Q,
      do a clockwise loop, and walk back out on the tail. Seemed easy enough. Well, on the return leg,
      we turned off on what we "thought" was the tail of the Q, and after a time, we knew we weren't on
      that tail. The park map had not shown this other trail that veered off the main trail at about
      the 3:00 mark. Thankfully, that trail dumped us out only a few hundred feet from the trailhead,
      and our car, but we recognized that we made this mistake in broad daylight, on a gorgeous day. No
      way I'm taking that chance on a more challenging trail, injured, at night. Too many risks in that
      equation.
      >


      Linda
      The Truly Educated Never Graduate
    • Jamie D.
      Yep, a copious amount of clean water used to flush a wound (at pressure if possible) is really all you need. some studies suggest it s even potentially more
      Message 68 of 68 , Dec 18, 2007
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        Yep, a copious amount of clean water used to flush a wound (at
        pressure if possible) is really all you need. some studies suggest
        it's even potentially more destructive to the injured tissue to use
        peroxide or other anit-bacterial cleaning agents.

        Huh, good old mother nature provided H2O, how about that.

        Another thing I find really interesting is that according to the
        rescue peeps I've talked to most rescues occur within a 72 hour
        period. That has changed the way I look at my "survival" kit.

        Jamie in AZ

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, pure mahem <pure_mahem@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Thanks for the info I will definately add the women's sanitary pad
        and remove the towlettes now that I know this. The reason I went with
        clorox as a water treatment is that I remember reading in one of the
        outdoor magazines or survival shows that overdosing iodine can be
        potentially deadly where as the clorox has a bit more of a higher
        fudge factor. another thing I thought of is that since I carry the
        alcohol couldn't I dilute a bit of the gel in a bit of water and come
        up with an applicalble antiseptic if needed? For the most part I guess
        I always figured that I would just use my treated water as a flush if
        I needed one.
        >
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