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Re: [Hammock Camping] Survival/emergency topics, was Solar Stills

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  • Rick
    ... I once had a midnight group of deer wander across the wooded hillside in Shenandoah park where a friend and I were hammock camping along the trail. I heard
    Message 1 of 68 , Dec 3, 2007
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      Linda Ellis wrote:
      > --- Tod Massa <todmassa@...> wrote:
      >> I think you are worrying way too much about animals. I have yet in three years of hammocking to
      >> be even approached by an animal while in a hammock - and I typically wake four or five times a
      >> night. Rarely such things happen, but it is very rare. Probably the biggest thing to worry would
      >> be porcupines taking your shoes during the night.

      I once had a midnight group of deer wander across the wooded hillside in
      Shenandoah park where a friend and I were hammock camping along the
      trail. I heard a buck stomping the ground and snorting at me when he
      discovered I was camping along a river in Ohio. A squirrel once spent an
      afternoon jibbering at me from the overhead branches when I took a nap
      in the hammock. At home, my cat sometimes rubs the outside of the
      hammock or jumps into the hammock with me when I have the hammock set up
      in the back yard. That's about it in several hundred hammock nights. No
      bears, no lions, no porcupines (not enough time up north for that yet)
      and no dogs.

      Ditto that in tents.

      I have had few animal experiences in shelters. There was a supper time
      bear trying to get to some suspended packs once. A bat flew through the
      shelter several times in the Smoky Mountains one night. Mice in
      abundance everywhere in shelters of course. Hornets in one shelter. And
      a goat tried to attack me at a shelter just south of Rockfish Gap in
      Virginia during a lunchtime break.

      Risk
    • Jamie D.
      Yep, a copious amount of clean water used to flush a wound (at pressure if possible) is really all you need. some studies suggest it s even potentially more
      Message 68 of 68 , Dec 18, 2007
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        Yep, a copious amount of clean water used to flush a wound (at
        pressure if possible) is really all you need. some studies suggest
        it's even potentially more destructive to the injured tissue to use
        peroxide or other anit-bacterial cleaning agents.

        Huh, good old mother nature provided H2O, how about that.

        Another thing I find really interesting is that according to the
        rescue peeps I've talked to most rescues occur within a 72 hour
        period. That has changed the way I look at my "survival" kit.

        Jamie in AZ

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, pure mahem <pure_mahem@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Thanks for the info I will definately add the women's sanitary pad
        and remove the towlettes now that I know this. The reason I went with
        clorox as a water treatment is that I remember reading in one of the
        outdoor magazines or survival shows that overdosing iodine can be
        potentially deadly where as the clorox has a bit more of a higher
        fudge factor. another thing I thought of is that since I carry the
        alcohol couldn't I dilute a bit of the gel in a bit of water and come
        up with an applicalble antiseptic if needed? For the most part I guess
        I always figured that I would just use my treated water as a flush if
        I needed one.
        >
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