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Re: Survival/emergency topics, was Solar Stills

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  • dt king
    ... see survival/emergency topics ... the first place! Avoiding a dangerous survival situation is a far underrated skill. Most often, experienced trekkers
    Message 1 of 68 , Dec 2, 2007
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Linda Ellis <lellis4563@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi, I'm new to this list, and this is my first post! I'm happy to
      see survival/emergency topics
      > discussed, because that's pretty much why I bought the hammocks in
      the first place!

      Avoiding a dangerous survival situation is a far underrated skill.
      Most often, experienced trekkers don't need to start a fire with
      sticks, because they brought three other ways of making a fire.

      The most dangerous hike you will ever undertake will start out as a
      short day hike. People going out for an afternoon in the woods don't
      pack the essentials for making it through the night, so missteps turn
      into tragedies.

      Don't hit the trail without the minimum gear to survive the night for
      each of you. Know how to use it without thinking. Hypothermia and
      dehydration make everybody stupid.

      Enjoy your retirement!

      David King
    • Jamie D.
      Yep, a copious amount of clean water used to flush a wound (at pressure if possible) is really all you need. some studies suggest it s even potentially more
      Message 68 of 68 , Dec 18, 2007
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        Yep, a copious amount of clean water used to flush a wound (at
        pressure if possible) is really all you need. some studies suggest
        it's even potentially more destructive to the injured tissue to use
        peroxide or other anit-bacterial cleaning agents.

        Huh, good old mother nature provided H2O, how about that.

        Another thing I find really interesting is that according to the
        rescue peeps I've talked to most rescues occur within a 72 hour
        period. That has changed the way I look at my "survival" kit.

        Jamie in AZ

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, pure mahem <pure_mahem@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Thanks for the info I will definately add the women's sanitary pad
        and remove the towlettes now that I know this. The reason I went with
        clorox as a water treatment is that I remember reading in one of the
        outdoor magazines or survival shows that overdosing iodine can be
        potentially deadly where as the clorox has a bit more of a higher
        fudge factor. another thing I thought of is that since I carry the
        alcohol couldn't I dilute a bit of the gel in a bit of water and come
        up with an applicalble antiseptic if needed? For the most part I guess
        I always figured that I would just use my treated water as a flush if
        I needed one.
        >
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