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Re: Thanks for all your input!

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  • Dave Womble
    ... Franc, I use 3/8 inch hollow-core braided polyester rope, a 30 degree sag angle, and I tie it to the tree with a non-cinching slippery bowline. Dave
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 31, 2007
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Francois" <franczazou@...> wrote:
      >
      > wow! I never realised how much you take your hamocks seriously!
      > Thanks for the feed back. Since we have to get this done by december
      > i don't think I'll be able to check for long term damage on the trees
      > but that's a very good point. I'll definitly flag the trees and go
      > check next summer though. We plan on testing 6 different kind of
      > trees commonly found in northern quebec. To stop the debate, those
      > who want to know how it turned out drop me a line, everybody else
      > please disregard this nonsense.
      > -Franc
      >

      Franc,

      I use 3/8 inch hollow-core braided polyester rope, a 30 degree sag
      angle, and I tie it to the tree with a non-cinching slippery bowline.

      Dave
    • Douglas Campbell
      Franc, I use 1 webbing, I wrap it around the tree 2 or 3 times (depending on how big the tree is); I spread the wraps apart so they cover more surface area. I
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 31, 2007
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        Franc,

        I use 1" webbing, I wrap it around the tree 2 or 3 times (depending on how
        big the tree is); I spread the wraps apart so they cover more surface area.
        I wrap the webbing on top of my hammock line (usually 3/8" yellow poly,
        hollow braid rope) and then tie my knot in the hammock line. This spreads
        the stress more or less equally on all the wraps of the webbing. I'd like
        to say that it never leaves a mark on the tree; but it's almost impossible
        to not leave a mark on the bark of pine, fir and spruce trees that we have
        up on our areas. I shoot for a 30 degree sag angle, but it seems to vary
        between about 30 and 40 degrees. I weigh about 152lbs (just in case you're
        doing calculations on the actual pull of the lines).

        Good luck with your research!

        Doug Campbell


        On 10/31/07, Dave Womble <dpwomble@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > "Francois" <franczazou@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > wow! I never realised how much you take your hamocks seriously!
        > > Thanks for the feed back. Since we have to get this done by december
        > > i don't think I'll be able to check for long term damage on the trees
        > > but that's a very good point. I'll definitly flag the trees and go
        > > check next summer though. We plan on testing 6 different kind of
        > > trees commonly found in northern quebec. To stop the debate, those
        > > who want to know how it turned out drop me a line, everybody else
        > > please disregard this nonsense.
        > > -Franc
        > >
        >
        > Franc,
        >
        > I use 3/8 inch hollow-core braided polyester rope, a 30 degree sag
        > angle, and I tie it to the tree with a non-cinching slippery bowline.
        >
        > Dave
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ralph Oborn
        Franc, My scouts and I use 1 1/2 inch webbing wrapped at least three times around the three to spread out the load. Angle (from horizontal) is usually 20° to
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 31, 2007
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          Franc, My scouts and I use 1 1/2 inch webbing wrapped at least three times
          around the three to spread out the load. Angle (from horizontal) is usually
          20° to 30°. Usually we camp in lodge pole or ponderosa pine. Occasionally
          bug willow trees on the river bottom.

          I use a HH and weigh about 220 lbs. Most of my scouts use Risk Test
          hammocks and weigh about 125 lbs

          We are proud of our LNT practices and have seen no ill effects, but we
          usually are in large trees with real rough bark.

          My exprimental test bed (at home) is two Lindon trees that show some
          abrasion where I left a hammock up for two months.

          I have a spread sheet that will help calculate loads if you would like,
          check with me off line. It would be fun to use my physics degree for
          something like this.

          Ralph (Pocatello Idaho)


          On 10/31/07, Francois <franczazou@...> wrote:
          >
          > wow! I never realised how much you take your hamocks seriously!
          > Thanks for the feed back. Since we have to get this done by december
          > i don't think I'll be able to check for long term damage on the trees
          > but that's a very good point. I'll definitly flag the trees and go
          > check next summer though. We plan on testing 6 different kind of
          > trees commonly found in northern quebec. To stop the debate, those
          > who want to know how it turned out drop me a line, everybody else
          > please disregard this nonsense.
          > -Franc
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Sandy Kramer
          I use Byer s of Maine micro-rope. The adjustable rope goes around the tree and a small silver bar slips into the loop of the hammock. I tried putting 2 strap
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 1, 2007
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            I use Byer's of Maine micro-rope. The adjustable rope goes around
            the tree and a small silver bar slips into the loop of the hammock.

            I tried putting 2" strap around the tree first, but it always slipped.

            http://www.nextag.com/BYER-of-Maine-Model-73953020/prices-html

            sandy



            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas Campbell"
            <campbell.d.p@...> wrote:
            >
            > Franc,
            >
            > I use 1" webbing, I wrap it around the tree 2 or 3 times (depending
            on how
            > big the tree is); I spread the wraps apart so they cover more
            surface area.
            > I wrap the webbing on top of my hammock line (usually 3/8" yellow
            poly,
            > hollow braid rope) and then tie my knot in the hammock line. This
            spreads
            > the stress more or less equally on all the wraps of the webbing.
            I'd like
            > to say that it never leaves a mark on the tree; but it's almost
            impossible
            > to not leave a mark on the bark of pine, fir and spruce trees that
            we have
            > up on our areas. I shoot for a 30 degree sag angle, but it seems
            to vary
            > between about 30 and 40 degrees. I weigh about 152lbs (just in
            case you're
            > doing calculations on the actual pull of the lines).
            >
            > Good luck with your research!
            >
            > Doug Campbell
            >
            >
            > On 10/31/07, Dave Womble <dpwomble@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <hammockcamping%
            40yahoogroups.com>,
            > > "Francois" <franczazou@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > wow! I never realised how much you take your hamocks seriously!
            > > > Thanks for the feed back. Since we have to get this done by
            december
            > > > i don't think I'll be able to check for long term damage on the
            trees
            > > > but that's a very good point. I'll definitly flag the trees and
            go
            > > > check next summer though. We plan on testing 6 different kind of
            > > > trees commonly found in northern quebec. To stop the debate,
            those
            > > > who want to know how it turned out drop me a line, everybody
            else
            > > > please disregard this nonsense.
            > > > -Franc
            > > >
            > >
            > > Franc,
            > >
            > > I use 3/8 inch hollow-core braided polyester rope, a 30 degree sag
            > > angle, and I tie it to the tree with a non-cinching slippery
            bowline.
            > >
            > > Dave
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Cara Lin Bridgman
            Franc, I ve been using the standard Hennessey set up, but unlike most Hennessey users, I don t set it up tight. I hang it as though it were a no-ridge-line
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 2, 2007
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              Franc,

              I've been using the standard Hennessey set up, but unlike most Hennessey
              users, I don't set it up tight. I hang it as though it were a
              no-ridge-line hammock with lots of flop and sag. I'm guessing the angle
              is 40 or more degrees hanging down from horizontal. I use the Hennessey
              tree-huggers (1" wide) wrapped once around the tree (most of the trees
              have dbh >30 cm. I weigh about 200 lbs.

              If you saw my earlier email, then you know I'm following the 'long-term'
              effects of a one-night hang on /Cryptomeria japonica/. It's long-term
              in that I want to know how long it will take before I cannot tell that I
              hung the hammock there.

              CL

              Francois wrote:
              > wow! I never realised how much you take your hamocks seriously!
              > Thanks for the feed back. Since we have to get this done by december
              > i don't think I'll be able to check for long term damage on the trees
              > but that's a very good point. I'll definitly flag the trees and go
              > check next summer though. We plan on testing 6 different kind of
              > trees commonly found in northern quebec. To stop the debate, those
              > who want to know how it turned out drop me a line, everybody else
              > please disregard this nonsense.
              > -Franc
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >

              --

              Please note my new email address: caralinb@...
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              Cara Lin Bridgman

              P.O. Box 013 Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
              Longjing Sinjhuang
              Taichung County 434
              Taiwan http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin/
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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