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Re: Best material for making quilts for use inside the hammock

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  • rghickma
    Dave, Good inputs, definitely gives me something to think about. I guess I should get some hang time in under some colder conditions to help better determine
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 12, 2007
      Dave,

      Good inputs, definitely gives me something to think about. I guess
      I should get some hang time in under some colder conditions to help
      better determine my needs.

      I made a cocoon based on Deb Weisenstein's design at:
      http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2762794360074761024coOUFG

      I used 1.1 ripstop for the inside and 1.9 ripstop for the exterior
      and top, the material was great to work with, no issues sewing or
      sewing the insulation material into the seams. I was able to shape
      the insulation forming it to keep the desired shape without undue
      tension causing any collapse of the insulation when in place over
      the hammock.

      While I have no reviews of how my cocoon actually performs while out
      camping because I have not had a chance to try it in various weather
      conditions. I am approaching the fabric choices for the quilt(s)
      with a little more caution since I could end up with a large expense
      in materials and they will be inside the hammock making the feel of
      the fabric seem a bit more important.

      Material sources for the cocoon:
      - Ripstop fabrics were ordered from Ed Speer
      - Insulation material was ordered from thru-hiker.com

      /Rodney
    • Jon Davis
      When it comes to materials other than down loft does not equal insulative value. Think of foams, the more dense the foam tpically the higher the R value. With
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 15, 2007
        When it comes to materials other than down loft does not equal
        insulative value. Think of foams, the more dense the foam tpically
        the higher the R value. With foams and often the hollow synthetic
        fibers the more dense it is the more small air pockets exist inside it
        that do not allow convection or conduction increasing the insulation
        value without lofting like down.


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@...> wrote:
        >
        > Rodney,
        >
        > The 1.1 oz rip stop nylon with DWR is the standby for the down quilts
        > I have made. I think that is what most of the DIY crowd uses unless
        > they have some specific application where they want something more
        > water resistance or want to see just how light they can make something
        > with the lightest possible materials they can get their hands on.
        >
        > I haven't used synthetic insulation before. I am curious as to why
        > you are using different types of insulation for the warm and cold
        > weather quilts when you are using one layer on one and two layers on
        > the other. I have looked at the Climashield and was a little puzzled
        > with the different versions they had of it. They had one that had the
        > best insulative value per ounce but it wasn't the highest lofting
        > version. What do you gain by not using the best insulative value per
        > ounce version?
        >
        > Dave Womble
        > aka Youngblood 2000
        > Designer of the Speer Segmented Pad Extender, SnugFit Underquilt, and
        > Winter Tarp
        >
      • Dave Womble
        Jon, I understand what you are saying. What I didn t have a good understanding of was in reference to the various versions of insulation that Climashield
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 16, 2007
          Jon,

          I understand what you are saying. What I didn't have a good
          understanding of was in reference to the various versions of
          insulation that Climashield sells
          http://www.climashield.com/products.php . They have their XP, HL, CL,
          and Combat versions. Their specs indicate that the HL is the highest
          lofting version and the XP has the most insulation per ounce... my
          question was why would you use anything other than the XP since it has
          the most insulation per ounce. Surely there are other tradeoffs
          because if there wasn't... why would you need anything other than the
          XP version? I was curious as to what those tradeoffs were. On their
          product pages, they list the same 4 applications for all four
          versions-- sleeping bags, outerwear, footwear, and gloves.

          Dave Womble
          aka Youngblood 2000
          Designer of the Speer Segmented Pad Extender, SnugFit Underquilt, and
          Winter Tarp

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jon Davis" <kohburn@...> wrote:
          >
          > When it comes to materials other than down loft does not equal
          > insulative value. Think of foams, the more dense the foam tpically
          > the higher the R value. With foams and often the hollow synthetic
          > fibers the more dense it is the more small air pockets exist inside it
          > that do not allow convection or conduction increasing the insulation
          > value without lofting like down.
          >
          >
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Rodney,
          > >
          > > The 1.1 oz rip stop nylon with DWR is the standby for the down quilts
          > > I have made. I think that is what most of the DIY crowd uses unless
          > > they have some specific application where they want something more
          > > water resistance or want to see just how light they can make something
          > > with the lightest possible materials they can get their hands on.
          > >
          > > I haven't used synthetic insulation before. I am curious as to why
          > > you are using different types of insulation for the warm and cold
          > > weather quilts when you are using one layer on one and two layers on
          > > the other. I have looked at the Climashield and was a little puzzled
          > > with the different versions they had of it. They had one that had the
          > > best insulative value per ounce but it wasn't the highest lofting
          > > version. What do you gain by not using the best insulative value per
          > > ounce version?
          > >
          > > Dave Womble
          > > aka Youngblood 2000
          > > Designer of the Speer Segmented Pad Extender, SnugFit Underquilt, and
          > > Winter Tarp
          > >
          >
        • Jon Davis
          Ah, I understand your question better now. From what i can tell from the product information there is basicly a curve of increased weight, increased comfort,
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 16, 2007
            Ah, I understand your question better now.
            From what i can tell from the product information there is basicly a
            curve of increased weight, increased comfort, for the same
            insulation value. the most insulative being the xp then hl then cl,
            the combad seems to fit in somewhere between xp and hl because it is
            the lightest insulation but has a mid level warmth to weight ratio.

            light, soft, warm. pick 2

            :)


            > Jon,
            >
            > I understand what you are saying. What I didn't have a good
            > understanding of was in reference to the various versions of
            > insulation that Climashield sells
            > http://www.climashield.com/products.php . They have their XP, HL,
            CL,
            > and Combat versions. Their specs indicate that the HL is the
            highest
            > lofting version and the XP has the most insulation per ounce... my
            > question was why would you use anything other than the XP since it
            has
            > the most insulation per ounce. Surely there are other tradeoffs
            > because if there wasn't... why would you need anything other than
            the
            > XP version? I was curious as to what those tradeoffs were. On
            their
            > product pages, they list the same 4 applications for all four
            > versions-- sleeping bags, outerwear, footwear, and gloves.
            >
            > Dave Womble
            > aka Youngblood 2000
            > Designer of the Speer Segmented Pad Extender, SnugFit Underquilt,
            and
            > Winter Tarp
          • C C Wayah
            I d be curious to know how each one compresses in the backpack for storage while hiking. Might be one is far too bulky???? Rogene ... From: Dave Womble
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 16, 2007
              I'd be curious to know how each one compresses in the backpack for storage
              while hiking.
              Might be one is far too bulky????
              Rogene

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@...>
              To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2007 9:32 AM
              Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Best material for making quilts for use
              inside the hammock


              > Jon,
              >
              > I understand what you are saying. What I didn't have a good
              > understanding of was in reference to the various versions of
              > insulation that Climashield sells
              > http://www.climashield.com/products.php . They have their XP, HL, CL,
              > and Combat versions. Their specs indicate that the HL is the highest
              > lofting version and the XP has the most insulation per ounce... my
              > question was why would you use anything other than the XP since it has
              > the most insulation per ounce. Surely there are other tradeoffs
              > because if there wasn't... why would you need anything other than the
              > XP version? I was curious as to what those tradeoffs were. On their
              > product pages, they list the same 4 applications for all four
              > versions-- sleeping bags, outerwear, footwear, and gloves.
              >
              > Dave Womble
              > aka Youngblood 2000
              > Designer of the Speer Segmented Pad Extender, SnugFit Underquilt, and
              > Winter Tarp
              >
              > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jon Davis" <kohburn@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> When it comes to materials other than down loft does not equal
              >> insulative value. Think of foams, the more dense the foam tpically
              >> the higher the R value. With foams and often the hollow synthetic
              >> fibers the more dense it is the more small air pockets exist inside it
              >> that do not allow convection or conduction increasing the insulation
              >> value without lofting like down.
              >>
              >>
              >> --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@> wrote:
              >> >
              >> > Rodney,
              >> >
              >> > The 1.1 oz rip stop nylon with DWR is the standby for the down quilts
              >> > I have made. I think that is what most of the DIY crowd uses unless
              >> > they have some specific application where they want something more
              >> > water resistance or want to see just how light they can make something
              >> > with the lightest possible materials they can get their hands on.
              >> >
              >> > I haven't used synthetic insulation before. I am curious as to why
              >> > you are using different types of insulation for the warm and cold
              >> > weather quilts when you are using one layer on one and two layers on
              >> > the other. I have looked at the Climashield and was a little puzzled
              >> > with the different versions they had of it. They had one that had the
              >> > best insulative value per ounce but it wasn't the highest lofting
              >> > version. What do you gain by not using the best insulative value per
              >> > ounce version?
              >> >
              >> > Dave Womble
              >> > aka Youngblood 2000
              >> > Designer of the Speer Segmented Pad Extender, SnugFit Underquilt, and
              >> > Winter Tarp
              >> >
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
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