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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Nice to Meet you, Ed and Karen

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  • Ralph Oborn
    When it gets cool, do you really need a bugnet?? Just asking? Ralph (in Idaho where the skeeters sleep at night) ... [Non-text portions of this message have
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 11, 2007
      When it gets cool, do you really need a bugnet??
      Just asking?

      Ralph (in Idaho where the skeeters sleep at night)



      On 10/11/07, QPens@... <QPens@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Dave,
      > I purchased the Speer model Snugfit since I have a Speer Hammock that
      > my
      > girlfriend sewed from one of Ed's kits. The set up was extremely simple
      > and
      > I like the fact that I can still use my bugnet exactly the way I did
      > before.
      > I was extremely comfortable once the temps dropped in the middle of the
      > night. It was extremely humid and everyone at the hang mentioned that it
      > took a
      > good while to cool down after hiking to the top of the ridge where we all
      > hung. I actually slept with nothing on top of me until about 3:30 AM
      > when I
      > awoke feeling cool...and, pulled one of the Jack's summer quilts over me
      > that
      > they had lent me to try. The combination worked perfectly and I was
      > comfortable the rest of the night. I slept like a log and woke up with
      > no back pain.
      > It was better than being in bed except for being alone :^ )
      > Dave...is there some way to vent the snugfit quilt in temps that are a
      > bit higher?
      > BTW, for those of you who missed the first Mid-Atlantic Hang, you
      > missed
      > a great time. Great people, great location, great weather and a great
      > place
      > to see all kinds of hammocks. The Jacks came with a bunch of different
      > hammocks from different manufacturers and displayed their
      > quilts/underquilts on
      > each one, plus their new bridge hammock. There were also a bunch of one
      > of a
      > kind hammocks made of different material. Oh-No came with his cuben
      > fiber
      > tarp and his bamboo and cuben fiber backpack. They were really nifty.
      > We are thinking of doing this again in the Spring...so, for those of
      > you
      > fairly close by, keep a look out on this board and Hammockforums.net/
      > Best,
      > Michael
      > qpens
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ************************************** See what's new at
      > http://www.aol.com
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Cara Lin Bridgman
      Yes--unless cool means below freezing. CL (in Taiwan, where it isn t just the skeeters that party all night)
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 11, 2007
        Yes--unless 'cool' means below freezing.

        CL (in Taiwan, where it isn't just the skeeters that party all night)

        Ralph Oborn wrote:
        > When it gets cool, do you really need a bugnet??
        > Just asking?
        >
        > Ralph (in Idaho where the skeeters sleep at night)
        >
        > On 10/11/07, QPens@... <QPens@...> wrote:
        >> I like the fact that I can still use my bugnet exactly the way I did
        >> before.
      • Scott Schroeder
        Dave, I know you addressed Michael, but this got my interest. You may recall I asked about possible solution in regard to something I did with the bridge
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 12, 2007
          Dave,
          I know you addressed Michael, but this got my interest.
          You may recall I asked about possible solution in regard to something I did
          with the bridge hammock.
          With an adjustable
          bottom<http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1438>,
          I think there could be a way to handle this.
          If there was two layers, one could start the night off with thinner
          insulation(first bottom), then when temperatures drop, reach up and pull up
          the second bottom. Also, you could just pull up the foot end and leave the
          head end 'open' or any combination. Perhaps the bottom most layer could be a
          bit thinner (and lighter) with this setup.
          Anyway, hopefully this winter I'll be able to play more with the
          possibilities.

          Scott


          On 10/11/07, Dave Womble <dpwomble@...> wrote:
          >
          > Michael,
          >
          > Yes, you can vent the SnugFit Underquilt.
          >
          > With the Speer model that you have, the sides of the underquilt attach
          > to the sides of the hammock and that gives you a different set of
          > options from the Universal model. You can leave the sides attached
          > and use a different loop on the shock cord going to the carabiners, or
          > move the carabiners from the bugnet attachment, or just disconnect the
          > carabiners all together. These will drop the underquilt from the
          > hammock some and you will get venting since it will no longer be an
          > efficient insulator with air gaps between it and the bottom of the
          > hammock. (You do have to worry about the quilt dropping down enough to
          > snag on something or maybe even drag the ground if your hammock is
          > hanging kind of low, so watch out for that.) You can also undo the
          > hook and loop fasteners on one side and then pull that side of the
          > underquilt underneath you and to the other side of the hammock.
          >
          > But venting is venting... it is not like you can just dial up the
          > precise amount of insulation you need. This is very much like having
          > a thick jacket that will keep you warm to freezing temperatures. When
          > it is too warm to use that jacket but just cool enough that you need
          > something, you can vent it by unzipping it, opening draw strings at
          > the waste, pit zips, etc, but it will not be as comfortable in 65F
          > weather as a light jacket or long sleeve shirt. Venting is what we do
          > to make the best of our situation when we have too much insulation to
          > be comfortable.
          >
          > Venting an underquilt is more difficult than venting top side
          > insulation especially since it often means you have to get up and make
          > adjustments. It is also a bummer in certain temperature ranges
          > because when you lay down to go to sleep it is too warm to need any
          > insulation what so ever, in fact it may be hot and you want to cool
          > off, what you want is an air conditioner... but you know that sometime
          > during the evening it will cool off and you will need some insulation.
          > Venting the underquilt will not solve that problem but it might help
          > it be more bearable. Sometimes I just wait and put the underquilt on
          > when it cools off. Sometimes I vent it and then un-vent it when it
          > cools off. Other times I just leave in on, vent on the top side, and
          > hope it cools off quickly. Venting is not like having an air
          > conditioner/heating system with an automatic thermostat, like I said
          > earlier-- venting is what we do to make the best of our situation when
          > we have too much insulation to be comfortable.
          >
          > When you get in conditions where the temperatures stay a little
          > cooler, perhaps 30-70F or so, I don't think you will worry about
          > venting your underquilt and will just vent your top side insulation as
          > necessary. With your Speer Model, I'm hoping you will not even know
          > it is there, especially if you use a big enough stuff sack to
          > accommodate the hammock with the quilt attached.
          >
          > Hope all that helps, sorry that I got long winded but I think venting
          > has been misrepresented at times as to just what you can do with it
          > and what you can't do with it and I wanted to use this as an
          > opportunity to help sort that out.
          >
          > Dave Womble
          > aka Youngblood 2000
          > Designer of the Speer Segmented Pad Extender, SnugFit Underquilt and
          > Winter Tarp
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • QPens@aol.com
          Hi Dave, Thanks for posting all of the different options for venting the Speer Snugfit. I ll try each of them, but, as you said, it s really only necessary
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 12, 2007
            Hi Dave,
            Thanks for posting all of the different options for venting the Speer
            Snugfit. I'll try each of them, but, as you said, it's really only necessary
            in warmer weather. I was actually very comfortable that night once my body
            cooled down and worked with the top quilt to vent. Thanks for designing such a
            great underquilt.
            Best,
            Michael
            qpens



            ************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Dave Womble
            Hey Scott, What you are does look promising and reminds me a little bit of the early approach Ray Garlington used with his undercover for his Hennessy Hammock
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 12, 2007
              Hey Scott,

              What you are does look promising and reminds me a little bit of the
              early approach Ray Garlington used with his undercover for his
              Hennessy Hammock where he had a pull cord rigged so he could pull it
              closed behind him after he got in his hammock. The last I recall Ray
              was using a top loading hammock and putting a big bag of feathers in
              his undercover for insulation and using all manner of accessories with
              his hammock. I don't know if Ray still comes to this forum, I don't
              recall him posting lately.

              Like you said, you will learn more about how all that works this
              winter and until you get out there with it and see how it does in
              backpacking conditions you won't really know whether it solves more
              problems than it creates. There is always that risk when you try
              something new, I know I have had that experience many times but it is
              part of the process. Good luck with it and let me know how it does.

              Dave Womble
              aka Youngblood 2000
              Designer of the Speer Segmented Pad Extender, SnugFit Underquilt, and
              Winter Tarp.
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