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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: hammock bivy idea!

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  • Billy Chard
    Deb can you do a rough pattern.. that would be fantastic.. i love your pod its just what i have been looking for.. BTW what kind if hammock do you have.. Billy
    Message 1 of 23 , Sep 5, 2007
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      Deb
      can you do a rough pattern.. that would be fantastic.. i love your pod its just what i have been looking for..

      BTW what kind if hammock do you have..

      Billy
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: mrbyer
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2007 8:51 PM
      Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: hammock bivy idea!


      I think I am confused as to exactly where the darts were removed. What
      edges, what direction. I apologize for my not understanding. Is your
      foot end a separate piece that was sewn on or did you remove material
      to get the cone shape? I can't see any seams in your phot so I think
      that also makes it difficult for me.

      R

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
      <dweisens@...> wrote:
      >
      > The insulation I used was Climashield HL, purchased from
      > thru-hiker.com (though the web site shows only Climashield XP
      > currently). I sewed it into the seams of the bag, but did not quilt
      > it, so it is attached only at it's edges and seems fine after 2 years
      > of use. I can't give you a blueprint because my hammock is
      > non-standard in length and width. What I did was hang the hammock and
      > lay inside. Then I tied a string to the foot end and used it to
      > measure the length from foot-end hanging strap to my neck on the top
      > side and bottom side of the hammock. The difference in top and bottom
      > measurements was what had to be removed with darts, by cutting out
      > several triangles of fabric and then sewing the edges together,
      > turning a flat piece of fabric into a 3-dimensional object. I think
      > the darts were about 12 inches deep. To get the needed circumference
      > of the pod, I measured it at various points while laying in it. I
      > could make a crude drawing of the pieces of fabric if this isn't clear.
      >
      > DebW
      >
      >
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "mrbyer" <mrbyer@> wrote:
      > >
      > > This is perfect Deb. As a beginner at making my own stuff I was
      > > hoping for to get some basic blueprints I could see. I am familiar
      > > with the term "dart" but do not really understand it. Also what type
      > > of insulation did you use? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
      > >
      > > R
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
      > > <dweisens@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I'm no longer using the hammock bivy, as it was somewhat heavy and
      > > had
      > > > condensation problems. What I'm currently using and absolutely
      > > love
      > > > is a sock/travelpod/cocoon which I insulated on the bottom and
      > > sides.
      > > > I can't seem to add a picture to my album on this site, but try
      > > this
      > > > link (http://good-
      > > times.webshots.com/photo/2250133370074761024yGKxmA).
      > > >
      > > > The key to making this a perfect fit on the hammock was to make the
      > > > bottom/side fabric longer than the top fabric. I put 4 10-inch
      > > darts
      > > > in the sides of the bottom fabric before sewing it to the shorter
      > > top
      > > > fabric. Without the darts, it would either cover my face or leave
      > > the
      > > > bottom side of my shoulders exposed. Because of the good fit
      > > around
      > > > the shoulders, and the bottom and side insulation, I need no foam
      > > pad
      > > > in the hammock. The outer fabric is a breathable ripstop with an
      > > > excellent teflon DWR coating. The inner fabric to cover the
      > > synthetic
      > > > insulation is the lightest nylon I could find. The single layer of
      > > > top fabric actually adds a lot of warmth also, so I often don't
      > > need a
      > > > sleeping bag inside until the wee hours of the morning. The cocoon
      > > > weighs 19 oz and lets me leave the foam pad at home, and I could
      > > bring
      > > > an even lighter sleeping bag or quilt if I had one. This system
      > > has
      > > > proven it's worth on windy rainy nights when the excellent water
      > > > repellency of the cocoon completely protected my down bag from
      > > > windblown spray. I've never noticed any condensation in it either.
      > > >
      > > > DebW
      > > >
      > > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick" <patrick@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > I'm presently working on a hammock sock/travel pod type *tube*
      > > for
      > > > > winter, made of two pieces of 60" x 130" 1.9 ripstop, 96" #3
      > > > > zippers on each side seam, drawstrings on the ends... I figure I
      > > can
      > > > > leave the zippers open a bit for ventilation, and I can also tie
      > > the
      > > > > drawstrings loosely to have ventilation at the ridgeline.
      > > Conversely,
      > > > > I can tighten it all down for very cold weather.
      > > > >
      > > > > My only concern is making sure there is ventilation (but not too
      > > > > much) to counter any condensation that might collect.
      > > > >
      > > > > I've made a bug bivvy this way, using noseeum instead of
      > > ripstop, and
      > > > > am very happy with it, no stress on the ridgeline...
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@>
      > > > > wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > mrbyer <mrbyer@> wrote:
      > > > > > I was wondering how many people have made a bivy, like Deb's
      > > and
      > > > > if
      > > > > > they would be willing to share plans, even basic ones to help
      > > a
      > > > > newbie
      > > > > > with a sewing machine. Thanks.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jwj32542" wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "athiker1994"
      > > > > > > wrote:
      > > > > > > > Had an idea today. A hanging hammock bivy.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Check out DebW's gallery first:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping/lst?.dir=/DebW%
      > > > > > > 27s+Photos&.src=gr&.order=&.view=t&.done=http%
      > > > > 3a//briefcase.yahoo.com/
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • gerzson
      My experience with a hammock sock was that it is significantly warmer but creates lots of condensation. Mine was made from a non-breathable ripstop and was
      Message 2 of 23 , Sep 6, 2007
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        My experience with a hammock sock was that it is significantly warmer
        but creates lots of condensation. Mine was made from a non-breathable
        ripstop and was full length - asking for it :)

        Now I am thinking of making one with one side mesh and one side
        breathable ripstop and use it in the summer with the mesh side up and
        in the winter rotated to a litle more than 90 degrees so I will have a
        mesh window (on the downwind side). The tube will also be able to
        support some bottom insulation.

        gerzson
      • rghickma
        Deb, Your cocoon is great, thank you much for sharing your process, material choices, and the picture. I hope you don t mind if I copy your ideas. The
        Message 3 of 23 , Sep 8, 2007
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          Deb,

          Your cocoon is great, thank you much for sharing your process,
          material choices, and the picture.

          I hope you don't mind if I copy your ideas. The information you
          provided is perfect, I can't wait to get started. I ordered the
          materials this morning. I ordered the Climashield Combat, I chose
          this because it looked to be near the HL specs and was a happy
          medium between the choices of Climashield XP (since I couldn't
          decide). :)

          I have a Speer hammock (from kit) with bug net, I think the bug
          netting over the face area will add warmth while keeping the
          breathing/condensation under control when the cocoon is pulled into
          place. I planning to use 1.9 ripstop from Ed Speer in hopes it will
          be breathable enough.

          I have gone from a scientific minded, measurement oriented person to
          a build by process. I like your ideas on how to simply make it to
          fit you/hammock. I am fortunate enough that my son is the same size
          as me, I am going to make him get in and I will pin it up to fit.
          Poor kid doesn't even know it is coming. :)

          Thanks again for taking the time to share.

          /Rodney

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
          <dweisens@...> wrote:
          >
          > The insulation I used was Climashield HL, purchased from
          > thru-hiker.com (though the web site shows only Climashield XP
          > currently). I sewed it into the seams of the bag, but did not
          quilt
          > it, so it is attached only at it's edges and seems fine after 2
          years
          > of use. I can't give you a blueprint because my hammock is
          > non-standard in length and width. What I did was hang the hammock
          and
          > lay inside. Then I tied a string to the foot end and used it to
          > measure the length from foot-end hanging strap to my neck on the
          top
          > side and bottom side of the hammock. The difference in top and
          bottom
          > measurements was what had to be removed with darts, by cutting out
          > several triangles of fabric and then sewing the edges together,
          > turning a flat piece of fabric into a 3-dimensional object. I
          think
          > the darts were about 12 inches deep. To get the needed
          circumference
          > of the pod, I measured it at various points while laying in it. I
          > could make a crude drawing of the pieces of fabric if this isn't
          clear.
          >
          > DebW
          >
        • d2aisy2000
          Deb, Thanks for your description of the measuring techniques and darts you used for your bivy. I made a down-insulated hammock (lengthwise tubes), and
          Message 4 of 23 , Sep 9, 2007
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            Deb,
            Thanks for your description of the measuring techniques and darts you
            used for your bivy. I made a down-insulated hammock (lengthwise
            tubes), and arrived at a good 3-dimensional shape by inspecting and
            adjusting the baffles before I attached the bottom surface and
            injected the down. Now I want to make a primaloft version for someone
            who's allergic to down. Your experience with Climashield could be
            very helpful. Did you put darts in the insulation as well as the
            bottom cover? I've thought of sewing the primaloft into tubes and
            using baffles, as I did with my down hammock, but I like the idea of
            just sewing the insulation at the edges of the hammock. Thanks.
            David
            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
            <dweisens@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm no longer using the hammock bivy, as it was somewhat heavy and had
            > condensation problems. What I'm currently using and absolutely love
            > is a sock/travelpod/cocoon which I insulated on the bottom and sides.
            > I can't seem to add a picture to my album on this site, but try this
            > link (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2250133370074761024yGKxmA).
            >
            > The key to making this a perfect fit on the hammock was to make the
            > bottom/side fabric longer than the top fabric. I put 4 10-inch darts
            > in the sides of the bottom fabric before sewing it to the shorter top
            > fabric. Without the darts, it would either cover my face or leave the
            > bottom side of my shoulders exposed. Because of the good fit around
            > the shoulders, and the bottom and side insulation, I need no foam pad
            > in the hammock. The outer fabric is a breathable ripstop with an
            > excellent teflon DWR coating. The inner fabric to cover the synthetic
            > insulation is the lightest nylon I could find. The single layer of
            > top fabric actually adds a lot of warmth also, so I often don't need a
            > sleeping bag inside until the wee hours of the morning. The cocoon
            > weighs 19 oz and lets me leave the foam pad at home, and I could bring
            > an even lighter sleeping bag or quilt if I had one. This system has
            > proven it's worth on windy rainy nights when the excellent water
            > repellency of the cocoon completely protected my down bag from
            > windblown spray. I've never noticed any condensation in it either.
            >
            > DebW
            >
            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick" <patrick@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I'm presently working on a hammock sock/travel pod type *tube* for
            > > winter, made of two pieces of 60" x 130" 1.9 ripstop, 96" #3
            > > zippers on each side seam, drawstrings on the ends... I figure I can
            > > leave the zippers open a bit for ventilation, and I can also tie the
            > > drawstrings loosely to have ventilation at the ridgeline. Conversely,
            > > I can tighten it all down for very cold weather.
            > >
            > > My only concern is making sure there is ventilation (but not too
            > > much) to counter any condensation that might collect.
            > >
            > > I've made a bug bivvy this way, using noseeum instead of ripstop, and
            > > am very happy with it, no stress on the ridgeline...
            > >
            > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@>
            > > wrote:
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > mrbyer <mrbyer@> wrote:
            > > > I was wondering how many people have made a bivy, like Deb's and
            > > if
            > > > they would be willing to share plans, even basic ones to help a
            > > newbie
            > > > with a sewing machine. Thanks.
            > > >
            > > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jwj32542" wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "athiker1994"
            > > > > wrote:
            > > > > > Had an idea today. A hanging hammock bivy.
            > > > >
            > > > > Check out DebW's gallery first:
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping/lst?.dir=/DebW%
            > > > > 27s+Photos&.src=gr&.order=&.view=t&.done=http%
            > > 3a//briefcase.yahoo.com/
            > > > >
            >
          • Debra Weisenstein
            I ve posted a diagram of my cocoon/insulated pod here http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2762794360074761024coOUFG My design has no zippers, just a
            Message 5 of 23 , Sep 9, 2007
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              I've posted a diagram of my cocoon/insulated pod here
              http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2762794360074761024coOUFG

              My design has no zippers, just a drawstring at both ends, so it needs
              to be over the hammock before the hammock is pitched. The head-end
              drawstring is elastic so I can slide it over me without fiddling. If
              I use a ridgeline, it goes outside the cocoon just to hold up the
              bugnet. My hammock is a homemade Speer-type.

              DebW

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Billy Chard" <bc100s@...> wrote:
              >
              > Deb
              > can you do a rough pattern.. that would be fantastic.. i love
              your pod its just what i have been looking for..
              >
              > BTW what kind if hammock do you have..
              >
              > Billy
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: mrbyer
              > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2007 8:51 PM
              > Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: hammock bivy idea!
              >
              >
              > I think I am confused as to exactly where the darts were removed. What
              > edges, what direction. I apologize for my not understanding. Is your
              > foot end a separate piece that was sewn on or did you remove material
              > to get the cone shape? I can't see any seams in your phot so I think
              > that also makes it difficult for me.
              >
              > R
              >
              > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
              > <dweisens@> wrote:
              > >
              > > The insulation I used was Climashield HL, purchased from
              > > thru-hiker.com (though the web site shows only Climashield XP
              > > currently). I sewed it into the seams of the bag, but did not quilt
              > > it, so it is attached only at it's edges and seems fine after 2
              years
              > > of use. I can't give you a blueprint because my hammock is
              > > non-standard in length and width. What I did was hang the
              hammock and
              > > lay inside. Then I tied a string to the foot end and used it to
              > > measure the length from foot-end hanging strap to my neck on the top
              > > side and bottom side of the hammock. The difference in top and
              bottom
              > > measurements was what had to be removed with darts, by cutting out
              > > several triangles of fabric and then sewing the edges together,
              > > turning a flat piece of fabric into a 3-dimensional object. I think
              > > the darts were about 12 inches deep. To get the needed circumference
              > > of the pod, I measured it at various points while laying in it. I
              > > could make a crude drawing of the pieces of fabric if this isn't
              clear.
              > >
              > > DebW
              > >
            • Debra Weisenstein
              Yes, I put darts in the insulation. I didn t sew the darts together in the insulation, just cut out the excess and let the sewing on the edges hold it
              Message 6 of 23 , Sep 9, 2007
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                Yes, I put darts in the insulation. I didn't sew the darts together
                in the insulation, just cut out the excess and let the sewing on the
                edges hold it together. The insulation really is sticky so it sticks
                to itself pretty well.

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "d2aisy2000" <delliott78@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Deb,
                > Thanks for your description of the measuring techniques and darts you
                > used for your bivy. I made a down-insulated hammock (lengthwise
                > tubes), and arrived at a good 3-dimensional shape by inspecting and
                > adjusting the baffles before I attached the bottom surface and
                > injected the down. Now I want to make a primaloft version for someone
                > who's allergic to down. Your experience with Climashield could be
                > very helpful. Did you put darts in the insulation as well as the
                > bottom cover? I've thought of sewing the primaloft into tubes and
                > using baffles, as I did with my down hammock, but I like the idea of
                > just sewing the insulation at the edges of the hammock. Thanks.
                > David
                > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
                >
              • mrbyer
                That diagram helps immensely. Thank you for taking the time to make and post it. ... removed. What ... material ... quilt ... the top ... think ...
                Message 7 of 23 , Sep 9, 2007
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                  That diagram helps immensely. Thank you for taking the time to make
                  and post it.

                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
                  <dweisens@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I've posted a diagram of my cocoon/insulated pod here
                  > http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2762794360074761024coOUFG
                  >
                  > My design has no zippers, just a drawstring at both ends, so it needs
                  > to be over the hammock before the hammock is pitched. The head-end
                  > drawstring is elastic so I can slide it over me without fiddling. If
                  > I use a ridgeline, it goes outside the cocoon just to hold up the
                  > bugnet. My hammock is a homemade Speer-type.
                  >
                  > DebW
                  >
                  > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Billy Chard" <bc100s@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Deb
                  > > can you do a rough pattern.. that would be fantastic.. i love
                  > your pod its just what i have been looking for..
                  > >
                  > > BTW what kind if hammock do you have..
                  > >
                  > > Billy
                  > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > From: mrbyer
                  > > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  > > Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2007 8:51 PM
                  > > Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: hammock bivy idea!
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > I think I am confused as to exactly where the darts were
                  removed. What
                  > > edges, what direction. I apologize for my not understanding. Is your
                  > > foot end a separate piece that was sewn on or did you remove
                  material
                  > > to get the cone shape? I can't see any seams in your phot so I think
                  > > that also makes it difficult for me.
                  > >
                  > > R
                  > >
                  > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
                  > > <dweisens@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > The insulation I used was Climashield HL, purchased from
                  > > > thru-hiker.com (though the web site shows only Climashield XP
                  > > > currently). I sewed it into the seams of the bag, but did not
                  quilt
                  > > > it, so it is attached only at it's edges and seems fine after 2
                  > years
                  > > > of use. I can't give you a blueprint because my hammock is
                  > > > non-standard in length and width. What I did was hang the
                  > hammock and
                  > > > lay inside. Then I tied a string to the foot end and used it to
                  > > > measure the length from foot-end hanging strap to my neck on
                  the top
                  > > > side and bottom side of the hammock. The difference in top and
                  > bottom
                  > > > measurements was what had to be removed with darts, by cutting out
                  > > > several triangles of fabric and then sewing the edges together,
                  > > > turning a flat piece of fabric into a 3-dimensional object. I
                  think
                  > > > the darts were about 12 inches deep. To get the needed
                  circumference
                  > > > of the pod, I measured it at various points while laying in it. I
                  > > > could make a crude drawing of the pieces of fabric if this isn't
                  > clear.
                  > > >
                  > > > DebW
                  > > >
                  >
                • rghickma
                  I finished my cocoon this weekend to go over my Speer type hammock. Using the diagram was very helpful saved me lots of time in deciding about where the darts
                  Message 8 of 23 , Sep 17, 2007
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                    I finished my cocoon this weekend to go over my Speer type hammock.
                    Using the diagram was very helpful saved me lots of time in deciding
                    about where the darts should start. It turned out great.

                    Materials I used:
                    1.9 Ripstop for the outside and top
                    1.1 Ripstop for inside (over insulation)
                    Climashield Combat for insulation
                    3/32 shock cord for both drawstrings

                    Since I did not put any Velcro on outside of the bivy, I slid it
                    over the ridge line to allow the bug netting to stay sealed. If
                    others are going to use ridgeline and bug netting inside the cocoon
                    I might recommend adding 8-10inches to the length at the fool end.

                    I also did not cut darts into the insulation. I did sew in some
                    slack (careful not to bunching it up) to simulate darts allowing the
                    center to not have tension (as it still needs to be longer like the
                    fabric. This way the insulation did take the shape very well
                    without bunching up.

                    Preliminary testing shows it to really add warmth with flexibility
                    to adjust the tension on the drawstring allowing adjustment to the
                    warmth.

                    Looking forward to getting it into the outdoors.

                    Deb, Thanks again for your time to provide so much information for
                    other do-it-yourselfers!

                    /Rodney

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
                    <dweisens@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I've posted a diagram of my cocoon/insulated pod here
                    > http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2762794360074761024coOUFG
                    >
                    > My design has no zippers, just a drawstring at both ends, so it
                    needs
                    > to be over the hammock before the hammock is pitched. The head-end
                    > drawstring is elastic so I can slide it over me without fiddling.
                    If
                    > I use a ridgeline, it goes outside the cocoon just to hold up the
                    > bugnet. My hammock is a homemade Speer-type.
                    >
                    > DebW
                  • mrbyer
                    Great to hear. I am looking for some time to set aside to sew mine. Post some pics when you get a chance. And continued thanks to Deb...
                    Message 9 of 23 , Sep 17, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Great to hear. I am looking for some time to set aside to sew mine.
                      Post some pics when you get a chance. And continued thanks to Deb...

                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "rghickma"
                      <rodney.g.hickman@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I finished my cocoon this weekend to go over my Speer type hammock.
                      > Using the diagram was very helpful saved me lots of time in deciding
                      > about where the darts should start. It turned out great.
                      >
                      > Materials I used:
                      > 1.9 Ripstop for the outside and top
                      > 1.1 Ripstop for inside (over insulation)
                      > Climashield Combat for insulation
                      > 3/32 shock cord for both drawstrings
                      >
                      > Since I did not put any Velcro on outside of the bivy, I slid it
                      > over the ridge line to allow the bug netting to stay sealed. If
                      > others are going to use ridgeline and bug netting inside the cocoon
                      > I might recommend adding 8-10inches to the length at the fool end.
                      >
                      > I also did not cut darts into the insulation. I did sew in some
                      > slack (careful not to bunching it up) to simulate darts allowing the
                      > center to not have tension (as it still needs to be longer like the
                      > fabric. This way the insulation did take the shape very well
                      > without bunching up.
                      >
                      > Preliminary testing shows it to really add warmth with flexibility
                      > to adjust the tension on the drawstring allowing adjustment to the
                      > warmth.
                      >
                      > Looking forward to getting it into the outdoors.
                      >
                      > Deb, Thanks again for your time to provide so much information for
                      > other do-it-yourselfers!
                      >
                      > /Rodney
                      >
                      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
                      > <dweisens@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I've posted a diagram of my cocoon/insulated pod here
                      > > http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2762794360074761024coOUFG
                      > >
                      > > My design has no zippers, just a drawstring at both ends, so it
                      > needs
                      > > to be over the hammock before the hammock is pitched. The head-end
                      > > drawstring is elastic so I can slide it over me without fiddling.
                      > If
                      > > I use a ridgeline, it goes outside the cocoon just to hold up the
                      > > bugnet. My hammock is a homemade Speer-type.
                      > >
                      > > DebW
                      >
                    • Patrick
                      FWIW, I finished my SockPod (that s what I m calling it, I suppose). Not quite as nice as what ya ll would come up with, but it will work for me... here s the
                      Message 10 of 23 , Sep 18, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        FWIW, I finished my SockPod (that's what I'm calling it, I suppose). Not
                        quite as nice as what ya'll would come up with, but it will work for
                        me... here's the link to photos:
                        http://picasaweb.google.com/brownpatri/HammockSockPod
                        <http://picasaweb.google.com/brownpatri/HammockSockPod>

                        Here's my report from another forum:

                        It's modeled after a bug bivvy I made a while back, (also modeled after
                        Blackbishop's hammock sock
                        <http://www.hammockforums.net/gallery/files/7/sock-inside1.jpg> , and
                        Just Jeff's hammock sock
                        <http://www.tothewoods.net/HomemadeGearHammockSock.html> and Risk's
                        travel pod <http://www.imrisk.com/hammock/travelpod.htm> ) and it
                        consists of 2 sheets of 125" x 60" 1.9 oz. DWR ripstop sewn together to
                        form a tube, with a 96'-ish #3 zipper (with 2 reversable pulls that
                        close head-to-head) at one seam and paracord drawstrings at the ends.

                        The drawstrings at the ends allow for easy setup and ventilation on each
                        end, and the zipper allows the pod/sock to be completely closed on the
                        ends, but still allows flexible ventilation through a moveable,
                        resizable, zippered vent hole (like Risk's pod). You can either pull it
                        up over you like a sock, or leave it set up completely and enter through
                        the side zipper entrance. The zipper entrance can also act as a window
                        to outside, which I find pretty important.

                        I have no idea what it weighs, but it could (always!) be made to be
                        lighter, by using lighter materials (lighter ripstop, etc), these were
                        just the materials I had at hand. I did use a lighter zipper, #3, and
                        also pulled the center fibers out of the paracord, but the biggest
                        difference would be the weight of the material itself. I also didn't try
                        to taper the material like Risk did.



                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick" <patrick@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I'm presently working on a hammock sock/travel pod type *tube* for
                        > winter, made of two pieces of 60" x 130" 1.9 ripstop, 96" #3
                        > zippers on each side seam, drawstrings on the ends... I figure I can
                        > leave the zippers open a bit for ventilation, and I can also tie the
                        > drawstrings loosely to have ventilation at the ridgeline. Conversely,
                        > I can tighten it all down for very cold weather.
                        >
                        > My only concern is making sure there is ventilation (but not too
                        > much) to counter any condensation that might collect.
                        >
                        > I've made a bug bivvy this way, using noseeum instead of ripstop, and
                        > am very happy with it, no stress on the ridgeline...
                        >
                        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner slowhike@
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > i have been planning one (in my thoughts) that will be more like
                        > the travel pod on risk's or jeff's site.
                        > > it will attach to the ridge line by 2 hooks. it will have a
                        > long, center zipper from foot to above head, & 2 short zippers at the
                        > end of the long one (above head) that will go down either side.
                        > > that way i can unzip the long, center zipper & one zipper on
                        > either side to enter or exit.
                        > >
                        > > i'm thinking of several variations...
                        > > 1) ...all bug net
                        > > 2) ...bug net top & nylon bottom
                        > > 3) ...all nylon (for winter) ...tim
                        > >
                        > > mrbyer mrbyer@ wrote:
                        > > I was wondering how many people have made a bivy, like Deb's and
                        > if
                        > > they would be willing to share plans, even basic ones to help a
                        > newbie
                        > > with a sewing machine. Thanks.
                        > >
                        > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jwj32542" wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "athiker1994"
                        > > > wrote:
                        > > > > Had an idea today. A hanging hammock bivy.
                        > > >
                        > > > Check out DebW's gallery first:
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping/lst?.dir=/DebW%
                        > > > 27s+Photos&.src=gr&.order=&.view=t&.done=http%
                        > 3a//briefcase.yahoo.com/
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > ---------------------------------
                        > > Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        >




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