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Hammock Basics?

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  • steve_n0tu
    I m enticed to purchase a hammock! Been reading about them and a little confused about the condensation issue and the mirade of accessories and continued
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 29, 2007
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      I'm enticed to purchase a hammock! Been reading about them and a little
      confused about the condensation issue and the mirade of accessories and
      continued discussions on on pads, underquits and nests etc.

      Ok so once I have my hammock what else do I need to stay warm? And
      what's the deal on condensation? That word scares me as I have down
      bags! I've been a using a tent/tarp as a ground hugger for years. My
      normal setup for tent/tarp in CO backpacking down to about 30F is my
      30F down bag on top of a Prolite 3/4 foam pad. I use my bag half
      unzipped quilt style and sleep in silk tights (top and bottom) If it's
      gonna be really cool I add more layers of fleece (tops and bottoms)and
      ski hat. I don't normally sweat and tend to side sleep the best. But I
      think that's because on the ground back sleeping usually isn't to
      comfortable for me?

      The lightweight, quick setup and getting up the off the bumpy ground
      aspect of hanging between trees sounds kinda appealing! Can I adapt the
      gear I own now to 'hanging' or do I need another whole $$investment to
      outfit my self for hammocks? Are there any hammock tutorial sites
      around?

      Thanks, Steve
    • Scott
      Yes, you can use the gear you have with a hammock. Many people sleep on pads in a hammock. However, many prefer an under-quilt. In many cases they are more
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 29, 2007
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        Yes, you can use the gear you have with a hammock. Many people sleep on
        pads in a hammock. However, many prefer an under-quilt. In many cases they
        are more comfortable than pads. Personally, I prefer an under-quilt. I
        don't like sleeping in a hammock with a pad.

        There are a great deal of forums and hammock sites. This list is a great
        resource. Another good resource is hammockforums.net.

        Here is a list of commercial camping hammocks, which may be of interest.
        SpeerHammocks.com
        hennessyhammock.com
        junglehammock.com/
        MosquitoHammock.com

        --
        Scott
        www.AntiFuel.com
        www.HikeHaven.com

        Minds are like parachutes, they only function when they are open.
        On 6/29/07, steve_n0tu <s2ranch@... > wrote:
        >
        > I'm enticed to purchase a hammock! Been reading about them and a little
        > confused about the condensation issue and the mirade of accessories and
        > continued discussions on on pads, underquits and nests etc.
        >
        > Ok so once I have my hammock what else do I need to stay warm? And
        > what's the deal on condensation? That word scares me as I have down
        > bags! I've been a using a tent/tarp as a ground hugger for years. My
        > normal setup for tent/tarp in CO backpacking down to about 30F is my
        > 30F down bag on top of a Prolite 3/4 foam pad. I use my bag half
        > unzipped quilt style and sleep in silk tights (top and bottom) If it's
        > gonna be really cool I add more layers of fleece (tops and bottoms)and
        > ski hat. I don't normally sweat and tend to side sleep the best. But I
        > think that's because on the ground back sleeping usually isn't to
        > comfortable for me?
        >
        > The lightweight, quick setup and getting up the off the bumpy ground
        > aspect of hanging between trees sounds kinda appealing! Can I adapt the
        > gear I own now to 'hanging' or do I need another whole $$investment to
        > outfit my self for hammocks? Are there any hammock tutorial sites
        > around?
        >
        > Thanks, Steve
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • basshigh88
        ... Check out www.tothewoods.net and go to the hammock camping section. Great information for newbies.
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 29, 2007
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "steve_n0tu" <s2ranch@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm enticed to purchase a hammock! Been reading about them and a little
          > confused about the condensation issue and the mirade of accessories and
          > continued discussions on on pads, underquits and nests etc.
          >
          > Ok so once I have my hammock what else do I need to stay warm? And
          > what's the deal on condensation? That word scares me as I have down
          > bags! I've been a using a tent/tarp as a ground hugger for years. My
          > normal setup for tent/tarp in CO backpacking down to about 30F is my
          > 30F down bag on top of a Prolite 3/4 foam pad. I use my bag half
          > unzipped quilt style and sleep in silk tights (top and bottom) If it's
          > gonna be really cool I add more layers of fleece (tops and bottoms)and
          > ski hat. I don't normally sweat and tend to side sleep the best. But I
          > think that's because on the ground back sleeping usually isn't to
          > comfortable for me?
          >
          > The lightweight, quick setup and getting up the off the bumpy ground
          > aspect of hanging between trees sounds kinda appealing! Can I adapt the
          > gear I own now to 'hanging' or do I need another whole $$investment to
          > outfit my self for hammocks? Are there any hammock tutorial sites
          > around?
          >
          > Thanks, Steve
          >

          Check out www.tothewoods.net and go to the hammock camping section.
          Great information for newbies.
        • Dave Womble
          ... Steve, you have a lot of questions. Good questions, but a lot of them and you probably aren t going to get all the answers you seek in a nicely laid out
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 30, 2007
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "steve_n0tu" <s2ranch@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm enticed to purchase a hammock! Been reading about them and a little
            > confused about the condensation issue and the mirade of accessories and
            > continued discussions on on pads, underquits and nests etc.
            >
            > Ok so once I have my hammock what else do I need to stay warm? And
            > what's the deal on condensation? That word scares me as I have down
            > bags! I've been a using a tent/tarp as a ground hugger for years. My
            > normal setup for tent/tarp in CO backpacking down to about 30F is my
            > 30F down bag on top of a Prolite 3/4 foam pad. I use my bag half
            > unzipped quilt style and sleep in silk tights (top and bottom) If it's
            > gonna be really cool I add more layers of fleece (tops and bottoms)and
            > ski hat. I don't normally sweat and tend to side sleep the best. But I
            > think that's because on the ground back sleeping usually isn't to
            > comfortable for me?
            >
            > The lightweight, quick setup and getting up the off the bumpy ground
            > aspect of hanging between trees sounds kinda appealing! Can I adapt the
            > gear I own now to 'hanging' or do I need another whole $$investment to
            > outfit my self for hammocks? Are there any hammock tutorial sites
            > around?
            >
            > Thanks, Steve
            >


            Steve, you have a lot of questions. Good questions, but a lot of them
            and you probably aren't going to get all the answers you seek in a
            nicely laid out package. Ed Speer's book comes closest to doing that
            for backpacking hammocks and will do a good job of answering your
            questions but what it can't do is tell you all the hammock related
            gear that has been introduced since he wrote it. Heck, new hammock
            gear gets introduced all the time so no written document can stay up
            to date on all of that. But Ed's book covers what was available at
            that time, the tradeoffs associated with them, and the basics of
            hammock camping. Nobody has come out with anything particularly earth
            shattering since then, just different ways of doing the same things,
            some with improvements and some with just a different set of tradeoffs.

            Basically you have a couple of classes of hammocks, bottom entry and
            top entry. They have their tradeoffs like ease of entry, using as a
            camp chair, how they handle insulation, comfort, etc. And within each
            subset there are tradeoffs as well-- size versus comfort and weight,
            how they handle bugnets, two-layer bottom for inserting pads, etc.

            Then you have tarps and the issues associated with them-- coverage,
            weight, ease of setup, wind protection, does it sag to much, does it
            easily shed rain and or snow, etc.

            Once you get past all those issues, then you have the issue of bottom
            side insulation. There is using pads, underquilts, sleeping bags
            designed to enclose a hammock, insulated hammocks, or even a double
            bottom where you put loose or bagged insulation in it. (And this is
            where the condensation issue you mentioned comes in to play...
            breathable bottom side insulation versus non-breathable bottom side
            insulation. The pad you currently sleep on is non-breathable and tent
            floors are non-breathable, you don't have a choice with that when you
            sleep on the ground. In a hammock you do have a choice, you can use
            breathable bottom side insulation if you choose and have less issues
            with insensible perspiration or even sensible perspiration (sweat).)

            It can get rather involved to work through all that, and there are a
            lot of opinions on what works well and what doesn't. And of course,
            some options cost more than others.

            Dave Womble
            aka Youngblood
            Developer of the Speer SPE and SnugFit Underquilt
          • steve_n0tu
            Dave your reply was most helpful! Thanks! It appears I ve got a lot to learn and experience w/hammocks. Yet another journey begins. Steve
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 30, 2007
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              Dave your reply was most helpful! Thanks!

              It appears I've got a lot to learn and experience w/hammocks. Yet
              another journey begins. Steve
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